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2

What you've described is hydroseeding, invented in the US in the 1940s. It's a slurry of grass seed, water, and other ingredients that help "stick" the seed to the soil and in most cases, cover it with a thin mulch. As these sites show, it's certainly available in the UK and EU.


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I think a good strategy for you would be to forget about sowing seeds directly into the gravel but instead sowing them into containers. You could also create a raised bed either directly on the gravel strip or slightly raised above it. Containers would also allow you some flexibility in your plantings by, for example, allowing you to, say, plant a cold-...


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Don't worry too much about the seed coat being attached to the cotyledon. At some point, once the cotyledon has grown enough, it will either fall off on its own, or you will be able to gently pull on the seed coat and it will come off easily. Until then, just be patient.


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A quick web search shows that roselle has a germination time of seven to fifteen days. This fits your own observation where a previous batch needed “eight days or so” So after six days, it’s too early to assume that your seeds didn’t germinate. If you didn’t slightly sand down or nick the seeds to accelerate water hydrating the seed, your germination time ...


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I followed instructions from Google to get water near boiling. And then put the seeds in that water and left for 12 hours. Next, I put the seeds into a wine glass, the only clear container I had, so I could check their progress. I pushed the seeds up to the side with some wet paper towels expecting nothing. BUT a few days later, the little buggers are ...


2

If your soil is marked for seed germination or even regular potting soil you should be ok. Most likely it is the choice of location to germinate. An alternative would be to research each seed type carefully and determine if the seed needs light to germinate and if so be prepared to move between dark and light as needed. Find a location in your living space ...


2

(Disclaimer: I am not a mycologist & am not an expert in mushroom cultivation, just a hobbyist) With that disclaimer out of the way, I've never come across anything about growing mushrooms aeroponically. I won't say it is impossible, but I can't imagine how it would work. Who knows, maybe you will be able to pioneer a method for this. Before you can do ...


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Replying to the update: I am not an expert at growing aeroponic or hydroponic potatoes. In fact, I have never done it. I do know a thing or two about potatoes though, so take this on the balance. Normally, aeroponics is used to grow seed potatoes, not potatoes for eating. The problem is that you need to input an enormous amount of energy to get potatoes ...


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There are already good general answers to this question, but I will add a couple of specifics. La Ratte is male and female fertile variety, so it is capable of producing seeds without a pollinator. If there are no other male fertile varieties nearby, the seeds will be self-pollinated. Self-pollinated seeds of La Ratte produce mostly tubers similar to the ...


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Some shade is better. The reason being that while Hibiscus sabdariffa enjoys a long period of heat while growing and maturing, like all seedlings it has to go through a vulnerable stage where the radicle and shoot emerge and need to be kept moist otherwise they can dry out. As always avoid keeping the soil wet since this can encourage rot which is made worse ...


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In shade - seedlings will just shrivel and keel over rapidly in full sun, you need to wait till they are little plants and growing well before giving them sunlight, and then do it gradually.


13

The tubers that are used for "seed potatoes" are grown and harvested exactly the same way as other potatoes, except for one thing. Like other members of the same plant family (e.g. tomatoes), potatoes are are easily infected with virus diseases. Some of these (like "potato blight") are serious and may cause the entire crop to fail. Others ...


28

Most potatoes, as far as I know, have the ability to flower and set fruit. The fruits, known as berries, are small green globes reminiscent of tomatoes, which makes sense seeing as how they're in the same family. It's very important to note that these fruits are somewhat poisonous, though! The seeds in the berries are viable and can, indeed, be planted for a ...


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Yes, they contain nutrients and as organic matter you could make a fertilizer out of seeds. The seeds I find in this list even have passable NPK profiles. I'm not going to argue their quality as a fertilizer, the problems that would probably occur with very starchy seeds or the work that goes into crushing a lot of seeds so they don't sprout (they can be ...


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Hibiscus (in this case H. sabdariffa) likes slightly acid conditions. Cocopeat (coir pith) is slightly acidic and the vermiculite and perlite are neutral, so this leaves the compost and water you are using. Compost when properly aged and mixed is also acidic but can vary somewhat depending on ingredients. So this brings us to the water you are using - ...


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It looks like these seeds are from an Acer, based on the "helicopter" structure. To be able to tell the species you will need more information, pictures of the leaves or from less dried up seeds.


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