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I don't often try the paper towel techniques etc. Plants don't need paper towels, ziploc bags, and hydrogen peroxide to propagate in the wild! For lavender, fill a seed tray with damp compost, sprinkle the seed on the surface, cover with a very thin layer of finely sieved compost, and put the tray in a clear plastic bag to prevent water loss. It should ...


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The question of when to harvest the seeds depends a lot on how safe the seeds are in their current location. If not eaten by birds or varmints, the sunflower's seeds will remain viable outdoors until next spring at least. If you're confident the seeds are fairly safe from pests, it's best to wait until the plant is mostly dead before harvesting, to make ...


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None of strawberries, raspberries, or kiwi fruit are grown commercially from seed. Strawberry plants produce "runners" which can be cut off to start a new plant. Raspberry plants can be dug up and split into smaller pieces to grow into more plants. Kiwi fruit are propagated either by grafting or by taking cuttings. If you put the seeds or the fruit ...


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It depends. Some plants have a natural annual cycle, but your plants may not be native to your part of the world so that may be either irrelevant or out of sync with your seasons. Some seeds need a cool "over winter" period (or artificial "stratification" in a fridge) before they will germinate. Some seeds need to be sown on the surface ...


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This USDA planting guide for California poppy has this information about seed collection, storage and planting (emphasis mine): Through the domestication process and the selection of horticultural traits, most complex seed dormancy requirements for garden variety California poppy have been reduced or eliminated. Domesticated California poppy seed germinated ...


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No, the hilum is not the point of the seed where it grows. It is actually a scar, the place it was attached to the mother plant (compare it with the navel in humans). Technically there are more points where a normal seed would grow, if you look here at the anatomy of a seed. You can see that the epicotyl will grow to become the shoots above ground, and the ...


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In some cases the seller might select a cultivar that is very prolific at producing many seeds on a shorter cycle (quick to bolt) for spout seed production (as the cash crop), while this is often an undesirable trait for seed you would want to achieve a large, mature, but not yet going to seed, food crop plant. A sprout seller can also get away with ...


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No, your chance of starting a new variety of tomatoes that bares deformed fruit is slim. Probably the same as your regular tomato making a deformed fruit. Unusual, but not rare. It does matter the seeds you save. Its matter on which plant donated the pollen to pollinate your plant. It is the same as humans we are all different when we come from ...


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Wash them in a weak bleach:water (1:10) solution (hydrogen peroxide can be used to kill mold spores, but active mold produces peroxidases that break down peroxide). Then stir them around gently for a minute or so, and then dry them as thoroughly as you had originally intended to. If they aren't too far gone, the hard seed coat will protect the seed inside ...


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Jujube you have is not fully ripened. These green jujubes will never germinate. You need to get brown, crumpled jujubes and eat "meat" of it and break shells to see if any has seed in it. If you buy premium Jujubes from supermarket, 100% you will not get seeds in them, I guess producers protect their market by doing so. You will need to get smaller type ...


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I have a version of this on the windowsill, where two shoots are conjoined. It happens to be the first almond I see sprouting. TBA Just fun!


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Bermuda grass needs constant soil temperature of 65°F or higher to germinate and grow well. If the soil temperature drops after it has germinated the grass seed may fail to survive. I don't know enough about your local soil temperatures to tell you when to plant Bermuda grass, but I think you will have to wait until mid spring at earliest. I suggest using ...


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The seedlings are showing the difference between Epigeal germination, where the cotyledon(s) are pushed above ground and protect the developing leaves, and Hypogeal where they remain below ground. There are plant families where different species show different behaviour, including the Araucariaceae which are southern-hemisphere conifers and also lilies and ...


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Andrew, I agree with Bamboo, the problem is not that a leaf is touching soil. There are a couple of hints in your photos to suggest over-watering. Looking at the damage on the first and second photo, there seems to be some spongy cell degradation, prior to browning. This kind of leaf damage is typical of plants that have been sitting wet, with insufficient ...


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I wouldn't worry about pruning off the leaf - the problem is likely that the plant is growing indoors - it needs to be outside. I don't know what your outdoor temperatures are like currently, but (assuming it's not bitterly cold) it's probably best to harden it off over a period of a week or so by leaving it out during the middle of the day for about 3/4 ...


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It looks like a member of the genus Vigna, which is the type of bean originating in the Old World, as opposed to the genus Phaseolus, the New World beans most western gardeners are familiar with (think runner beans). Judging by the color, your beans look a lot like mung beans, although the growth habit of the seed pods is slightly different. But judging by ...


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It is Alpinia purpurata, commonly known as Red Ginger or Ostrich Plume, but it is not an edible form of ginger. Propagation is usually done by dividing the rhizomes or bulbs, but you can also use leafy offshoots and plant those, see here https://www.backyardnature.net/yucatan/red-ging.htm


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With the large flowers like this, they can go mouldy after picking. Make sure to cut the fleshy back off the flower if you use the lazy way of letting it dry inside. Of course, as kilobyte says, taking all the seeds out stops this problem.


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Fenugreek's botanical name is Trigonella foenum graecum'; it's an annual plant and is in a different plant family (Fabaceae) from Rungia klossii, which is an evergreen perennial in tropical regions, so it would seem these are two different plants. More information on Rungia klossii here https://www.jekkas.com/products/mushroom-plant, but without a botanical ...


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These beans were picked perfectly ripe - for a cook. In the kitchen, “beans” can mean two1 things: A fleshy seedpod, which formed shortly after flowering, but which has not formed a seed yet. Sometimes you can see the future seeds when you look closely. A fully formed seed, which is removed from the seed pod, which by that time is at minimum thinner-walled ...


1

In most cases, yes. Dehydration by itself does not significantly deteriorate pepper seeds viability. In fact, that's how most people store their seeds for future use. However, the quality of the seeds might be affected depending on the dehydration process that the pepper went through. If the pepper/seeds got heated to make the dehydration process faster, ...


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If your garden compost was produced in the manner most of us do, that is, just chucking it in the bin and leaving it to get on with it, rather than turning a couple of times a week, then your compost may contain pathogens and is not suitable for use in pots at all. On the other hand, if the compost happens not to contain any pathogens, you might find your ...


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Do not worry. I just never used the "plastic" above the seeds. I know that paper was used, but I never cared much. I also seed plants on my greenhouse, when the temperature is a lot less 20 degrees. It just will take some more time, but do not worry. Do no worry much about soil. Seeds need just humidity, no nutrients. Old (and compost) dirt have just more ...


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No. Germination is done with nutrients inside the seed, you do no need any fertilizer, nor sun. In fact most seedling soil has little or no nutrients: they just keep water. In general, there is no need to speed up the process (dark storage is often not a problem also on large scale). With some plant, some chemicals are used (e.g. to soften seed), but to ...


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I tried the hydrogen peroxide 1/3 to 2/3 water and paper towels. It worked great! I was sprouting jalapeno seeds and they sprouted in approximately 3 days! I put them in zip lock bags and placed them in a sunny window. I also did this for store peppers, bells, and they also germinated way quicker than just potting them up!


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Definitely holly hocks they look like my seed they sre the mallow family, some people like using them for a medicinal plant and for making teas


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If you germinate it with mold, I think it will probably die or not be born healthy. What you can do is remove the bark (be careful with the tip of the seed not to break). If the seed is healthy inside (no mold), you can plant without problems.


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Radboud University in the Netherlands has an interesting publication on tomato pollination and how things can go wrong. The picture in the article shows how the male and female parts are very closely aligned, and if they become productive at the same time, all it takes is a shake from wind or air blower or visiting insect to successfully transfer pollen from ...


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American plant patent law states that you cannot VEGETATIVELY propagate a patented plant without the patentholder's permission. This does not prevent you from creating a new cultivar via the "old-fashioned" way. BUT HUGE CAVEAT! If the patented plant is genetically modified, then you cannot include the modifications in the child plant, even if that plant ...


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