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2

It looks as if the third one has had some soil washed aside around the base of the seedling so that some fine roots are visible. You can certainly top that up to cover any roots, but not so much it causes a raised level around the stem. When you water, do it with a gentle stream, preferably trickled slowly all over the soil so this doesn't happen again.


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If you ask me it depends on how valuable your young plants are. If you have much more seedlings that you need, then you can afford some attrition and the plants that come out of the harsh experience should be hardier than the previous generation and make for a better plant the next year


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I grow under lights and with a heat source and I have an approximately one-week hardening off sequence: Day 1 - Full Shade on the north side of a building. Out of the wind, if possible. Day 2 - Dappled shade Day 3 - About an hour of sun Day 4 - Morning sun; maybe 3 hours Day 5 - Same as Day 4 Day 6 - Morning sun until roughly noon Day 7 - Full sun ...


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I'm not sure what cracking them would do, except possibly damage them. Your stratification procedure sounds OK, but after that they should have been planted about 3 inches deep in compost in pots, not kept on a paper towel. You could try doing that now, then stop fussing over them (except for keeping the compost damp) and just wait. If they don't germinate ...


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If all normal daylight really came from a "point source 93 million miles away", you would see many different things compared with the way they are. For example, the sky during the day would be completely black. Shadows on the ground would also be completely black. At sunrise and sunset, the light level would change from "normal" to "pitch black" in a few ...


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This is Iris japonica , details here https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/9281/Iris-japonica/Details. Although not considered particularly invasive, it does spread by means of long, slender, creeping rhizomes, and yours has spread quite a bit. If you can find another spot for it in the garden, move it there, preferably a place without paving nearby because it ...


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In my grandfather's day in the UK, many grocery shops received bulk goods in wooden boxes, typically about a 3 foot (1 meter) cube made from thin plywood sheets nailed to a softwood frame. These "tea chests" (though they were not exclusively used for tea) were given away free to anybody who wanted them, and were ideal for making things like seed trays. The ...


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You might look for example at John Claudius Loudon's "Encyclopedia of Gardening" (1835) where you will find that gardeners made great use of boxes of various kinds, from big boxes for orange trees to smaller boxes for mushrooms and seeding. It would have been no problem to go to your local chippie and request that he made up a few dozen shallow open top ...


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One of my grandfathers started his seeds in 1.5"/2" diameter clay pots in a well-lit upper-story bedroom. No artificial lights or heating mats. He also started his seeds later than we do now (his tomatoes were only 3 inches tall when planted out, for example), probably to prevent lots of etiolation. For a Memorial Day planting (which is when we planted ...


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