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6

Sedum spectabile - there's more than one pink variety, and one with darker more reddish flowers called 'Autumn Joy'. It's an herbaceous perennial, hardy, and the flowers are popular with some butterflies. Common name Ice plant (Sedum spectabile).


4

Sometimes what I do is leave the plant to die down but I don't cut off the flowering stems- soon afterwards sometimes you will notice little buds down the stem- then what I do is cut off the entire stem and root it sideways in a tray of multicompost indoors- making sure the buds are touching the soils surface- every one should be a new plant- and if your ...


3

It's not a problem, just the reaction of the plant to sunny conditions. The best colour to absorb energy for photosynthesis is green. If you are getting so much you cannot use it many xeriscape plants produce other pigments as a sunscreen. As wikipedia states In direct sunlight, plants face desiccation and exposure to UV rays, and must expend energy ...


3

We have a dozen of more of these planted with various succulents and experiments and we garden in zone 5a which is colder than your zone. Winter preparation is to move them to an area with good snow cover. Snow is an excellent insulator from the wild changes in temperature that seem to be the new norm. Toronto weather tends to be moderated by the lake but ...


2

Likely its being indoors - if its Sedum ewersii, these are deciduous, so it would normally be resting right now if you're in the Northern hemisphere. They grow best outdoors, in normal weather conditions, which is what they're adapated for, so this plant may be finding it hard to cope being placed under lights in the middle of winter inside. Transition shock ...


2

This happens to me when the plants are growing too soft. Reasons for this can include: Too much water Too much fertilizer Not enough light These plants can become very fragile when the conditions are too 'good'. In my area, even specimens growing in full sun, in dry, poor soil (what these plants need) can fall apart in a heavy rainstorm. Wherever your ...


2

Put on a pair of thin vinyl or latex gloves. Wet your fingers with gloves on in a small bucket of Roundup weed killer. Gently wipe your fingertips over the grass blades. Of course try to avoid touching the sedum. It won't require much, just wet the grass blades and the Roundup will kill the grass and leave the sedum alone.


2

I found it in a botanical garden and it is Sedum rupestre/Sedum reflexum. There are two varieties of this species and you can tell them apart when they bloom. One has upright flower stems, the other one has somewhat curved flower stems.


2

It could be Crassula tetragona rather than a Sedum, which is a South African native, but because it's spindly with few leaves, it is hard to be certain, image here https://www.bigstockphoto.com/image-134308073/stock-photo-closeup-of-miniature-pine-tree%2C-crassula-tetragona%2C-succulent-plant-with-woody-stem-grown-in-south-australia


1

As this stem is rotten at the base, I suggest you remove it completely - keep the pot dry, only watering when the surface feels dry to the touch, so that the other stem bases don't also rot. If there are drainage holes in the pot, that's fine, if not, there should be. If you want to keep the same arrangement in the pot next year, likely by spring the Sedum ...


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