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13

You've got a bad infestation of fig wax scale. The ants are there for the honeydew, and are ant-farming. You want to get rid of the scale, they're basically living off of your plant, using up resources. If it's a small plant, you can use a pen or other pointy thing and pop as many off as you can, onto a small drop-cloth, to be destroyed. The rest can be ...


8

I'm not an entomologist but by googling, it looks to be a Rose Weevil or Fuller Rose Beetle aka Naupactus (Asynonychus) godmani. It doesn't look like it's a goodie to have on your roses The damage done by this beetle is to the foliage of the host plant by the adults and the root system is damaged by the larvae. Death of the host rose bush is a very ...


7

The brown dots are an advanced infestation of scale. This is not the fig scale which looks pinkish and has an unusual shape but a more common variety. This is a common pest and regardless of the species control is the same. The white dots could be young scale or whitefly attracted by the sticky sap the scale excretes. You can learn more from this link: ...


6

In addition as per @Bamboo answer I would do the following: Make a severe pruning. That means to prune half of shoots. Burn the prunnings in a suitable location. Do not forget to move the prunings in a bag to avoid spreading the plague. Buy some insecticide for scale insects. Read the insecticide label. Reread the insecticide label. Follow the safety tips. ...


5

Here is a quick answer Take it home Cut every leaf off Reduce water and wait for new growth to appear When scale appears use 5 ml dish soap to one litre water apply with rag or cloth three times at six day intervals


5

Check the instructions on your dormant oil - if its a newer formulation, it should have instructions regarding dilution rates for use on non dormant plants - a weaker dilution, in other words. Otherwise, your superior oil, intended for use on greenleaved plants, might be better, but again, check the instructions. Best to check your Pieris during winter, ...


5

If you can remove them from the leave then they are scale. Due to the dark colour I believe they are Black Scale (Saissetia oleae). They suck juices from the plant and excrete a sugary sap. Look for sticky leaves. Ants are sometimes seen in close company with these pests. For small plants some control can be done with soap and water but a complete answer ...


5

I've had every kind of pest and didn't want to trash my babies. The only thing that has worked for me is to take them, pot and all, if small or if large, out of the pot wash roots and submerge them completely under water. I have a small creek by my home so it's convenient. Tubs will work just the same: bury them completely under the water, make sure not ...


5

Edit: After a tip from Bamboo and a close up picture this looks like a scale insect. Most likely this is oyster shell scale Control can be done in a number of ways which I list below: take a soft scrub brush soaked in 5 ml of soap to 1 litre of water and scrub them off the affected areas. Repeat three times at 7 to 10 day intervals. or prune the ...


5

The problem with a large tree like this is that trying to spray it requires professional equipment. Even with a pressurized sprayer you will get whatever you are spraying drifting onto to neighbors or public property. In North America you would be opening yourself up for possible legal action by doing this. As you will not get complete coverage and scale ...


5

You have a scale infestation. I know I’ll get responses to this blog, that sympathetic gardeners will be recommending me a wide range of products and treatments to control scale insects: rubbing alcohol, insecticidal soap, neem oil, horticultural oil, dancing around a cow’s horn at full moon, etc. But scale insects are sneaky. If even one escapes ...


4

Most likely horse chestnut scale, common on large and small Acer varieties in the UK, as well as lime and horse chestnut trees. Although it's unsightly, on large trees it's impractical to treat, and won't kill the tree anyway. On smaller trees, you can use disposable cloths moistened with a little methylated spirits to rub over the affected woody parts, ...


4

The plant is a Euonymus - hard to say which, because parts of it have reverted to plain green, but probably was originally Euonymus japonicus aureum. All branches which are entirely plain green should be removed at the base, from the trunk. Reshape to a size and overall appearance that you want - this plant responds well to pruning, but if you remove a lot ...


4

It's Euonymus scale, so called because it loves Euonymus plants, as you've discovered, in particular, evergreen varieties. I don't know what part of the world you're in, but you need to seek out a pesticide which treats for these, or they will completely decimate the shrub/s. These are the male scales you're seeing - there will be female ones (which I can ...


3

If it's a decorative plant just use a systemic insecticide that is absorbed by the roots into the plant tissue. https://www.amazon.com/systemic-insecticide-scale/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Asystemic%20insecticide%20for%20scale


3

This is a Strelitzia and it has a soft scale. Most likely this is Boisduval scale. It is most likely that the scale came with the plant from the greenhouse. It would have been under control and not visible due to the growers pest control program but after you received it they would have started spreading from their hiding places in the leaf sheaths. The ...


3

If you live near a hydro grow shop they will carry a product called Mighty wash. It's like 20 bucks but if you spray every 3 days for 2 weeks it will clear it up, I had the same problem. And your plant will look green and heathy again. It's worth a try.


2

They are scale insects; spray the plant with summer oil mixed with systemic insecticide (Acitamiprid or Imidacloprid) according to the concentration mentioned in the label. Then do a repeat spraying after two weeks. It is better to add some foliar fertilizers to the solution sprayed. Note: do not use winter oil instead of summer oil. If you have not found ...


2

It is truly a beautiful plant! Get NEEM...this works very well and is pretty safe. Spray it at night so as not to hurt bees...just in case. Neem works very well with scale! You might have to do it every other week. Rent a sprayer or buy a cheapie 2gal pump sprayer. Spray the trunk, limbs and definitely under the leaves. This works very well and safely.


2

They're scale insects, in particular, brown scale. Ants are attracted by the honeydew they produce, and won't be causing any harm to your grapevine - deal with the scale and the ants stop coming. Unfortunately, they suck the sap of the plant and reduce vigour - the honeydew they produce often causes a subsequent attack of sooty mould, but that's related to ...


2

Look, this method of drowning will drown the plant as well, cause stress. Using Neem is not a one time thing, normally. I do make up a batch of Neem in a 5 gallon pots and dunk smaller plants, upside down holding the soil in the pot. I'll spray or splash a bit on the surface of the soil but dunking and soaking the entire batch of soil, plant, pot is just ...


2

DO NOT cut off the growth of this plant. Mix Chrysal "Leafshine Concentrate" with water in a spray bottle. Spray the plant (safe to do in the office - I have used this product in countless offices on plants ranging from 6" planters at people's desk to 14" planters with 20 foot trees in them) and wipe clean with a clean cloth. This will not only take care of ...


2

what I do for scale bugs, is to dip a qtip in rubbing alcohol and rub them off... then apply neem oil when I cant see any living scale bug... it usually works pretty well for control, but they are hard to really eliminate...


2

This solution is a little labor intensive but soapy water in a spray bottle (just a drop or few of soap mind you) applied regularly will suffocate most pests. it can take a few weeks at once or twice a day, depending on how thoroughly you spray all the nooks and crannies


2

To be frank, I'd remove it. The new shoots from the base which you've been cutting off are arriving because the tree is desperately trying to put out new growth because its upper parts are so badly damaged. If it's scale, you should be able to find small, usually brown disc shaped objects attached to the woody parts - the white fluffy bits on the leaves will ...


2

Probably what you scraped off were adult scales - crawlers may have been beneath, or were too small to notice and you only saw them once they got a bit bigger and attached themselves. New scale insects are unlikely to be the old ones reattaching themselves. Staghorn fern can be very sensitive to insecticides, and often insecticides aren't that effective on ...


1

I just did the soaking method with dish soap. I had them on a jade plant I took from an outside garden. I have had them on this plant for a while and finally made the decision to do something about this. I also scrubbed the stems with a toothbrush. I rinsed them very well in laundry sink and them put them back in the bucket over night I still had some in ...


1

I have used olive oil (extra virgin). It clogs up the scale insects' lungs and they can be nudged off when dead.


1

Yes, scale. I have about a 10 ft one and it looked worse and worse for 2 years until I realized it had bad scale problem.I scraped a lot off with my nail, I think that would be the way to handle your small one. I will hit mine with oil spray ( if I can remember this year ) . Baby oil = mineral oil = dormant spray oil ; it all comes out of the same refinery ...


1

Graham is correct, this is an advanced scale infestation and they are tricky to control. Here are my recommendations: remove all leaves cleanly with knife or sequiturs. Clean with rubbing alcohol after you are done prepare a mixture of 5ml dish soap and one litre of water. get a rag or cloth and soak in the soap and water apply the soap solution on the rag ...


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