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4

The Yates rose gun seems to get rid of rust on frangipanis. I have had some good results in Broome and Melbourne using this product.


4

I would not intentionally compost any plant material with a fungal infection. Fungal spores stay dormant in the soil. Good horticultural practice says you'll plant your garlic elsewhere next year, so you'd reduce the risk of transmitting the rust, but you're asking for problems if you spread this material around in a year or two's time in your compost. ...


3

Those tiny grasshopper-looking jerks are thrips. The spots are from thrips piercing the leaf with their mouths and sucking out the contents. As far as I know, the leaves are safe to eat. I would just wash them to remove the buggers and their frass. It’s probably an annual problem because thrips can overwinter under plant debris or mulch. Come spring, ...


2

It is disease. What is important to know here (Australia) is whether this is puccinia psidii (Myrtle Rust) because the nursery will have to be informed. official info at https://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive-species/diseases-fungi-and-parasites/myrtle-rust Contact details for help in Victoria at: https://agriculture.vic.gov.au/biosecurity/...


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Shouldn't be a problem - iron oxide isn't water soluble, so is unavailable to plant roots, meaning they won't take it up. This link https://homeguides.sfgate.com/can-rust-planter-harm-herbs-97056.html, whilst it refers to herb growing, might be of interest.


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Iron compounds are very common in soils, usually some form of oxide. Red soils are normally the result of iron . So I can't think of a reason it could be a problem for plants. I sometime add cast iron exercise weights to the bottom of a pot to help keep a top-heavy plant upright.


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Puccinia allii is dispersed by the wind but that's because it sporulates on the infected leaves spreading the infection. The spores persist on infected material and can reinfect your garlic the following year when the spores can be splashed back onto the new garlic leaves. That's why it's recommended that once you have an infection you should not grow ...


1

Chillis don't like you touching their roots, don't change the compost. Also it looks like you may have thrips as well, unless the leaf deformation is due to the aphids.


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