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Rose aphids (Macrosiphum rosae). The two backwards-facing tube are black, which confirms identification. Not good for roses. They carry viruses from plant to plant, and a large number on a rosebud will stop the flower forming. What to do? search this forum for "rose aphids". If you have time you can rub them off with gloves into a bucket, natural ...


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I don't think it's a climbing rose, its growth habit suggests it's not, combined with the major flush of smaller flowers, with a lesser, ongoing display; these features are not typical of climbing roses. I was wondering about a rambling rose, which fits with the major flush of flowers, again not huge blooms but masses of them, and with sporadic flowers later,...


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I know of one rose (a climber not a bush) which is not growing in a particularly warm part of the UK, is more than 100 years old, and almost always has one or two flowers open at Christmas. So winter flowering is not unheard of! Cutting off dead flowers keeps the rose looking tidy, but it doesn't really count as "pruning." You should give the bush ...


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Plant them in the ground. Unless you have a greenhouse , they would be more likely to die in pots over winter. In garden zones 5 and 8 , I have never had a problem with planting something in the winter . And hybrid tea roses ( assuming that is what you have ) tolerate cold weather. In zone 5 , I started cuttings in the ground; as winter came I put an ...


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Choosing a rose is somewhat more complicated than simply choosing it for the flower colour. Roses are also not particularly easy care plants - they require deadheading, spraying against pests and diseases, and pruning properly once a year. Most roses prefer as much sun as possible, but there are varieties which do quite well with much less sun on north or ...


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You can plant them outside if you have a space for them, but you need to harden them off first, by placing outside during the day for 2 or 3 hours the first day, increasing the time you leave them out over a week or so, until they're out all night (preferably a milder night). After that, they can be planted in the ground. If you want to keep them in pots (...


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Most of the rose flowers pictured exhibit what is known as 'colour breaking'. This is usually caused by a virus in various types of plant, and when professional growers/breeders see this occurring, they will attempt to breed from the plant to create a whole new variety whuch reproduces the colour break feature, without compromising healthy growth. It doesn't ...


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I have the same thing and it ultimately developed to a point where all the leaves were eaten away. This may be a problem with rose slugs (sawfly larvae). One thing I've been trying is heavy doses of Neem Oil spray all over the leaves. To the point where they are dripping from the oil.


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Depends on which clematis variety. On the assumption the Clematis is a smaller cultivar, or one that needs pruning back to 9 inches in winter, and you want it to climb up the rose, plant as close as 6-9 inches away from the rose roots - easier to plant both at the same time, putting the rose in first, then the clematis, so you don't accidentally damage the ...


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Almost all rose seeds advertised on Ebay and similar sites are a rip-off, because there is no way to know exactly what you will get until you see it. Professional growers cross-pollinate different rose varieties in controlled conditions and grow the seed in the hope of producing something good. If you plant say 1,000 seeds, then wait two or three years ...


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