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3

Removal of some or most soil from about the roots may be quite helpful for small trees in containers, and perhaps for small transplant trees with roots wrapped in burlap etc, but for larger trees becomes more problematical the larger the tree: eg, tree transplanting equipment, which lifts the tree & roots & soil: when planting, something is required ...


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Interesting question; the soil may be depleted, so when refilling, maybe consider fresh soil. Before refilling the hole, place a thin vertical solid plastic barrier material around the perimeter of the excavated hole to stop/slow incursion of new roots, that extends down deeper than the bottom of the hole. The hole would have to be deep enough to discourage ...


2

Ivy is almost impossible to remove. There are a few ways to deal with Ivy . . . The easiest way for you, since you have already dug out and removed a lot of Ivy roots, is to just keep careful watch for any Ivy foliage that has started to grow back in the area you don't want it in and remove it. Other plants can grow around the Ivy roots if the growth of the ...


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You definitely can plant new items on your terrace garden--but it may take some time. If you're comfortable, you can first spray the area with a chemical herbicide such as glyphosate--but this is optional as I do not typically do this. If a chemical herbicide is not an option for you because you're going to plant something you will eventually eat or your not ...


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Shouldn't be a problem to repot them into separate pots. Plant to the same depth, use a good quality, free draining compost and they should be fine. Don't let them dry out, obviously. More information here.


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