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4

If you cut the tree down you don't need to remove the roots. They will die and decompose naturally in a few years. Assuming the roots under your house are in complete darkness, nothing will grow there even if you get a few suckers growing from the roots elsewhere in the yard. Removing a substantial amount of the roots on one side of the tree without felling ...


3

Growing vines from store bought yams and potatoes is relatively simple, it just takes time and patience. I've grown multiple vines from a variety of tubers. From the looks of it, you have sweet potatoes, not yams. Yams have rougher skin and are more cylindrical in shape. It is not unlikely for a sweet potato to be mislabeled, law or not. Plus, there are ...


3

Large trees like it just the way it is. I have seen numerous trees killed or put into slow decline by trenching, cutting roots or even just driving heavy equipment over the area under the drip line. Depending on soil, type of tree and what exactly you plan to do you might get away with cutting up to one third of the roots. No guarantees... You would ...


2

You can make few holes on it, or just a large hole near the plant. Professionally, a bad, but common, method to do mulching, is to use plastic sheets. Air enter and exit from any hole, so you make sure there is some place to let air to enter, and that the sheet (cardboard) has some separation from soil. Plants will not breath like human, so no need to have ...


2

You usually graft from an existing, fruit-producing tree onto rootstock. You don't typically graft a seed-grown tree onto another seed-grown tree. Grafting "budwood" from a producing tree onto rootstock provides two benefits: 1) the new tree immediately starts producing fruit, thereby skipping the 3 to 7 year juvenile stage where the tree does not produce ...


2

Yes, throw it all out and use fresh compost. You can throw it on your garden or compost heap, not in the waste bin, of course. The ecosystem you have in a small pot isn't diverse enough to decompose the old roots, and in any case that would take months or years to complete. For example having earthworms (and smaller soil-dwelling animals) living in a pot ...


2

In Australia the tree would probably live with such rough treatment, but the removal of a big root would make it more likely to fall over in a storm.


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It's possible, but not advisable. For one thing, using a sealant of any sort on any woody part of a tree is no longer recommended, since infection rates proved to be higher in trees treated this way. Removing a root entirely is worse than shaving some off one, but both may compromise the tree by putting it at risk of either instability or infection. The ...


2

Sometimes Google images can provide a picture which approximates what you are seeing. See for example this Alocasia with snake-like stems which appear to be just elongated upright stems that have flopped over due to gravity. In this case the clue to identity lies in the top growth; you might have to look around for a sample which clearly indicates through ...


2

There is a discussion here on Reddit that speculates on what these might be; I think the most likely is the start of new lateral roots. They remind me of the hair roots that form on seedlings when highly filtered/purified water is used in the greenhouse. Maybe they do not do much because they are still in pure water and have no incentive to go exploring ...


1

Yes it would effect the root development as the plant grows out of the seedling stage. Roots develop to best serve the plants needs depending on its given location based on basic rules. if the growing medium keeps drying on the outside edges of the rectangle pot and the centre is kept moist, then the roots will go towards the water, which happens to be ...


1

The rule, when planting out a tree (or any plant) growing in a container, is to ensure the soil level once it is planted is no higher than it was in the pot in terms of the main stem or trunk of the plant. At this stage, roots are not visible and should not be - with trees, roots may appear above ground after some years, and that particular root flare should ...


1

OK I'll bite, and to cut to the chase I would figure this will likely fail. My reasons are these: when we normally take cuttings for vine propagation we take a section of a vegetative stem with a dormant bud and section of cane below the bud, we wound the cane section and provide bottom heat. Roots grow from the wounded cambium and this triggers the bud out ...


1

No, worry is the wrong word, perhaps concerned is more appropriate. Eighteen inches is very close to a building for any tree or even shrub come to that. Tulip tree (also known as yellow poplar) is not known for being an unreliable tree so it is not likely to suddenly crash on your house or lift concrete. However it is known to be a fast growing tree ...


1

I have killed more Dracaena Marginata than I care to recall with overwatering. The roots are thick and the plant is used to full sun outdoors in drier climates. Indoors in a large pot I would expect the plant not to put on a lot of top growth as the roots will expand into the new pot. If you leave it in the larger pot I recommend: move to the highest ...


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cardboard is as permeable to air as soil is, no harm there, you could inadvertently create a dry spot though... if you have a way for water to get down you will be fine, new cardboard is surprisingly waterproof.


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That might be root mealie bugs. If they appear to be alive, quarantine this plant from all the others. Remove all the potting media and trim any dead roots. You can spray with 70% isopropyl alcohol once you've removed all the bugs you can. There are many other treatment options, but alcohol is usually handy in the home. Mealies are nasty and can spread ...


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