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Removal of some or most soil from about the roots may be quite helpful for small trees in containers, and perhaps for small transplant trees with roots wrapped in burlap etc, but for larger trees becomes more problematical the larger the tree: eg, tree transplanting equipment, which lifts the tree & roots & soil: when planting, something is required ...


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Hmmm nice tree. Looks like a fan palm. Any recommendation on action would really only be fair in a professional consultation but I guess there is no problem making a few observations: looks like it is firmly rooted in the centre and on three sides at least, with the weaker side towards the house so that is good because the good roots are holding it up away ...


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According to https://www.ncforestservice.gov/publications/techBulletins/TRB013.pdf "Studies show that about 4-17% of container seedlings do not develop a tap or sinker root after out-planting." It is unclear if this statistic is in reference to regular potted plants, chemical root pruning with copper, or air pruned specimens. Also the source of that ...


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Sorry, but the only solution here is to fell the trees. If you have 3" diameter roots that you can see at ground level, you have no idea what is going on 5 or 10 feet below ground level, unless you do a huge amount of digging. And if you do cut off all the roots on one side of the tree, think what might happen the next time you have a severe wind storm. ...


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Current thinking is that the significant roots of the tree will extend to at least the end of the branches that are farthest from the main trunk (the drip line). Finer roots will extend out even farther depending on soil type and species of tree. See here for details


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Before deciding on whether it's okay to move the hedge, you need to know what tree you're dealing with. Assuming that the hedge is, as you note, either hornbeam or beech, then you need to look at the root systems of both trees: The European Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) has a wide and shallow root system. It is a fairly slow-growing tree. According to the US ...


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From my experience, you can and should remove those from avocado roots. I do not know what that is exactly but I observed that the more of those bumps appear on the roots, the slower the seed develops. If I remove it, the seed comes back to life. There is another thing I figured I need to watch out for, that slows down and eventually kills the seed - white ...


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No one's answered you and there are several things I can pass along since I'm a "master gardener" - though that doesn't apply as much here as my experience. I have grown avocado trees from pits successfully numerous times. What you're seeing here, in my opinion, is mold. I suspect you're exposing the pit to too much water. After removing all the ...


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Ivy is almost impossible to remove. There are a few ways to deal with Ivy . . . The easiest way for you, since you have already dug out and removed a lot of Ivy roots, is to just keep careful watch for any Ivy foliage that has started to grow back in the area you don't want it in and remove it. Other plants can grow around the Ivy roots if the growth of the ...


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Interesting question; the soil may be depleted, so when refilling, maybe consider fresh soil. Before refilling the hole, place a thin vertical solid plastic barrier material around the perimeter of the excavated hole to stop/slow incursion of new roots, that extends down deeper than the bottom of the hole. The hole would have to be deep enough to discourage ...


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You definitely can plant new items on your terrace garden--but it may take some time. If you're comfortable, you can first spray the area with a chemical herbicide such as glyphosate--but this is optional as I do not typically do this. If a chemical herbicide is not an option for you because you're going to plant something you will eventually eat or your not ...


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It will have no affect on the tree. I have many southern pines of the same size . I have cut many roots, I can hardly dig a hole to plant or for a sprinkler without cutting roots. I take cutters with the shovel anytime I need to dig a hole. I have cut 4 " diameter roots a few feet from pines and oaks, only problem is that it is work.


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How much time do you have? Another means, rather than using herbicides or digging them up, is to cut them close to the ground and put a tarp on them. This process is called occultation. It works much better with small weeds rather than ones with large root systems. But the principle is the same: with less exposure to light, the weeds will be weakened, and ...


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Application of weedkiller, among others are one way. However the real method that's environmentally friendly is to simply dig up the root and kill em.


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Triclopyr or Glyphosate come to mind. Both have short soil persistence. Check legality of injecting into roots in your area. Also check label, as these herbicides are often compounded with other herbicides, which may have a long half-life in soil. You do Not want that. I actually drilled holes in my trumpet vine gone crazy, and poured the glyphosate directly ...


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It sounds like you probably didn't give your plants enough water. Plants don't send out roots to find water, they send out roots to follow it. If your plant roots were only a few cm deep, then that's probably how deep your watering went. Your watering regime should be to water deeply when you do water, and water again when the top few cm dry out. That ...


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How wide is the tree's canopy? In general, a tree's root system spans 1.5 times the tree's canopy, but even so, a large tree twenty-nine feet from a house should pose no damage to your foundation. I have two Norway maples on the "terrace" (hell-strip) less than that from my house and they've caused no issues to my house's foundation. As for the ...


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This is not mould this is a plant living in water and the roots are calcifying and eating through these this will not harm your plant my brother has many of these and so do I not a worry if you actually look at some of the seeds they actually have a mould growing around there that's different to what is growing on the roots


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No worries. Virtually no chance of it tipping. Most of the roots are deep down into the ground. Those you see on the surface aren't what's holding it upright. Feel free to remove the bits of wood -- they aren't helping to hold the tree up and I don't think you could hurt the tree by removing them. Many types of palms grow roots at or above the surface and ...


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vanda orchids are from Thailand and love a tropical environment the metal you have the plant in is a possible reason why. (the roots don't like the metal as it is toxic for them as they will absorb it! ) the roots should not have black or brown spots as that means the plant is suffering from some sort of toxicity try using clay or plastic pots as that ...


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Hello I planted 3 Pinus Pinea Stone (Umbrella) pines at a distance less than 2 meters of the walls of my house and I began to worry if the roots of these pines after 30 years when become big will wreak harm and bring down the house and for this reason I began to watch on GOOGLE STREET VIEW whole towns and villages in Italy and Greece where there these pines ...


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Cherry tomatoes will be ok in those pots. Do not let them get too dry or too hot.


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Roots hanging out the bottom of a pot are a sure sign the plant needs a bigger pot and has done for some time, although a close fitting outer pot can sometimes encourage this to happen. I don't know why you think these plants like to be rootbound, but either way, it needs a bigger pot. It's going to be difficult because there is quite extensive root growth ...


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I use aluminum flashing as a root barrier between my yard and my neighbors' yards, installed directly under my fence. This can have sharp edges, which is why it's under the fence. Works great, except when something tries to climb over the top. As far as I know, there are no chemical treatments on the aluminum (I've never seen residue of any kind or noticed ...


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yes, changing the grade on an established tree is risky. If you do as you indicated you were thinking about and remove soil then let the roots sit on top of the soil this will stop them from absorbing water and exchanging nutrients with the mycorrhizal fungi in the soil. The roots will effectively stop working. I often find people writing that they ...


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