9

That's a pretty prolific plant. You should have no trouble propagating it from cuttings, but… you have to select the right growth stage to cut from. You should only root from the newer (but not too new) growth. The best time is late spring to early summer when the newer growth is just starting to become woody. Cut sections of about 6-12" and strip ...


8

I cannot answer the detailed questions, but put the cuttings in a plastic zip-top bag with a few bits of damp paper/cardboard/sphagnum moss/etc. - seal it tightly, but leave as much air inside as is practical if they are leafed. It isn't essential, but the longer you can keep them refrigerated until you can strike them, the better. Also, if you have 3% ...


7

From personal experience, I'd disagree with the statement that rooting hormones are ineffective, but it depends what you're using it for. I prefer the powder formulation to gels or liquids because there seems to be less chance of rot with the powder, and it has a longer shelf life, but essentially, rooting hormone preparations contain a chemical formula that,...


5

Having tried this (unsuccessfully) with "spring cuttings" (friends were moving and leaving their house with cherry tree, so it was then or never) my research into it suggested taking cuttings in the fall and letting them develop roots over the winter as being much more likely to succeed. As such, while you certainly could try to pack in damp newspaper and ...


5

Air layering is used when the stem cannot be easily bent down to the ground for ordinary layering. Both types of layering recognize that some plants are hard to root and will root more easily if instead of cutting from the plant and taking the risk that the cutting will not produce roots we leave it attached to continue growing. The host plant then performs ...


2

There are a lot of factors that govern plant propagation. Trust me, almost every gardener wishes we could just stick 'em in the ground and have multiple plant babies! Let us look at a few of the factors: Some plants will simply not like propagation through gels, root powders and other agents. They might need a lab setting with carefully delivered hormones. ...


1

OK I'll bite, and to cut to the chase I would figure this will likely fail. My reasons are these: when we normally take cuttings for vine propagation we take a section of a vegetative stem with a dormant bud and section of cane below the bud, we wound the cane section and provide bottom heat. Roots grow from the wounded cambium and this triggers the bud out ...


1

Blackberries fruit on two year old canes - so the one that broke off is one. Your accident is similar to the one I had a few days ago - but as most gardeners know, blackberries are very eager to propagate, either from roots or tips that bend down and grow roots. My thornless one is manageable, but wild blackberries can drive a gardener mad... So putting ...


1

How large is your new lawn? Sod is so very great at rooting, I am sure that rooting hormone WOULD NOT BE COST EFFECTIVE. Once you've laid your sod, ROLL with a water filled roller to increase soil/root contact. Water well...squishy...I don't feel is necessary. Allow to dry slightly to encourage roots to grow deeper. It should take a week or two to root ...


1

Try DIVISION. Like Spirea and Hosta, Privets grow new stems from the ground. When a new stem establishes, you can dig around it, separate/sever the roots of the new stem from the main plant, and replant the new growth. It's not a fast way to get a lot of new Privets, but it's almost guaranteed. For normal propagation, like the other answer said, it might ...


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