9

I'm sorry to say it will hurt the tree - over time, as they mature, many trees develop buttress roots at their base, but upheaval around the base of a tree, even without buttress roots, is to be expected. The roots are essential to the tree's survival, and should not be cut, shaved or removed. Perhaps you could replan the walkway to leave space around the ...


6

Tree pruning will not necessarily slow root growth. The best way to deal with the possibility of roots getting into things they shouldn't is to Dig a trench about six to eight inches deep between you and your neighbours at a convenient location. Then go to your hardware store and buy some 40 or 60 millimeter pool liner. Usually food grade for ornamental ...


6

Yes, and no (see below), but it does it naturally, and there is no need to 'cut off roots and leaves'. You just leave it in its pot, allowing the foliage to die down, pull off the shrivelled, brown foliage, then just water very occasionally and sparingly so the compost doesn't completely dry out and shrink to a solid lump. When you see new growth starting, ...


5

Yes, of course it will hurt the tree - it will be cutting away part of the system that transports water and nutrients to the tree. Often in cases like this it's best to decide that you want the tree, or walkway, and get rid of the one you don't want. Either that or you need to modify the walkway so that it is compatible with the tree, since trying to modify ...


5

I don't know about Southern Catalpas, but Northern Catalpas are hardy trees. I cut one down that was about 15', and it grew back a number of times that year (I removed the shoots whenever they started to grow again). They grow from seed like weeds in my yard, too. Their wood is pretty light and easy to saw. I don't have experience transplanting trees so ...


4

I have no idea, never heard of it, usually the only time you need to trim roots is if they are damaged, when you may take off those parts affected. It is, though, common to be advised to prune back the canes (topgrowth) to 6-8 inches if this has not been done prior to despatch. I certainly wouldn't advise cutting back roots for plants which are going to be ...


4

Sure, there's the chance it won't make it but it probably will. And a chance you'll damage the pear tree too in the process but you probably won't. Ideally, I would move it early in the year before the spring growth when things are dormant. I've successfully moved trees and bushes other times of year - I moved two crape myrtles last weekend and it was ...


4

This plant is pot bound but that should not be the cause of the spotting. Nonetheless repotting is a good idea: get a sharp knife and some interior plant potting soil. Something with extra drainage factors like perlite or vermiculite. Do not use soil from the garden which will not drain as readily in a pot. remove the plant from the pot. Check that the ...


4

It's because when they dig the plant, the dirty ragged cut the digger leaves on the roots is left when the plant goes to storage. The roots on your plant used to be a lot longer, but (of course) when they were dug, the roots had to be cut. That's why trimming off the last 1/2 - 1 inches of root can be good for the plant, sort of like trimming dead/ragged ...


4

You will need to do something, as its a cherry tree, and a fruiting one at that, particularly if you haven't bought one on a dwarfing rootstock. Otherwise, I agree with Kevinsky's answer, its worth a try. The problem with cherry in particular is that they are known to be surface rooters, and do have a tendency to put out long roots just below the ground. ...


4

No, leave it alone, it's fine. It is not critical to root prune, and certainly not critical to remove the soil which forms the existing rootball. All that's critical is to use proper, new potting soil to pack round the rootball in a clean, larger pot with drainage holes and water in well, then look after it ongoing. Generally, the only time you might try ...


4

I wouldn't recommend doing this, how ever if you do, water several days before you do any digging around the roots allow time for the tree to fully hydrate before potential damage occurs during procedure. Allow your self at least several hours to do this, cut with a spade a circle as large as the canopy itself, look up for a guide and go done about 2 spits ...


3

Well, as I said in comments, not sure what this plant is, but it looks some kind of Crassula maybe. Looks much better now it's repotted, I just hope there's a drainage hole or two in the bottom! Now you've decided to give the offshoots and their roots a chance by resting them on soil, just keep an eye on them - if you notice any rot developing on their stems,...


3

Yes. These suckers are wasted energy for the growth of your tree, flower and fruit formation. This is quite common on root stock tree. I would also suggest buying a black porous membrane to stop the suckers from coming up then mulch on top to starve of light.


3

If you want to plant it in full ground, just loosen up the root ball a bit (with breaking some of the outer thin roots). That will stimulate new root grow. Are you sure it is the right time to plant it in full ground in your part of the world? Usually that would be spring time. If you want to repot it, you may loosen it up again but I would keep as much as ...


3

I've done this with members of the aroid family of which spaths are members. soak the rootball before repotting to the leaves have a good supply of water take sharp knife and cut the bottom one quarter of the roots off using the same sharp knife make a series of vertical cuts around the root ball and remove and loose roots repot in a pot of one size larger ...


2

Alternatively to the other answer, Spathiphyllum can be divided - this is where a sharp bread knife comes in handy. I'd cut the rootball in half and pot up both sections separately, keeping it well watered till it recovers. If you don't want two plants, pot them both anyway and bin one if it's not growing as well as the other.


2

It encourages new root growth which is important to the plant's survival in the first several weeks. It's common for bare-root stock of many sorts to suggest trimming the roots. If you don't trim the roots, the plant has less impetus to push out fresh roots. That's all. It's like pruning the tops, if you don't prune you get leggy plants with less fresh ...


2

It is less known that palm roots can be of great use by humans. For example, a web site says: the root of the palm trees can be used to treat urinary tract infections and bladder problems. This is because the roots of sugar contains high potassium silicate and so can smooth urination. To process this sugar root you can make herb decoction of the roots of ...


2

I agree, the councils are becoming ever so educated on these topics with many queries going directly to specific departments. They are best to talk to if you want to keep out of potential problems with your neighbour but failing that, roots can cause some serious damage to your property, let alone your garden so please consider all actions including ...


2

It's unlikely that any drainage pipes will be that close to the surface so any roots should just pass overhead.


2

The answer you mention is a very detailed one and is still appropriate. Keep in mind that many houseplants, like your asparagus fern, will only flower when they are pot bound. With a healthy plant like yours you can take some quick action with a sharp knife and be done in minutes and still be friends afterwards.... Cut off the bottom one third to one ...


1

It depends on the size of the pine- how much root system it has. Here in the "piney woods" the typical southern pines have 4 ' diameter trunks and could easily lose a 6 " root with no problem. When the center of my lot was cleared of pines , a bulldozer dug out one side then pushed over the trees ( not quite as easy as it sounds). The idea was ...


1

I have a 10 ft tall Lyrata in a 30 cm pot. It has some roots out the bottom and a few over the top rim and down to the saucer. I don't trim the roots and I am not moving it to a bigger pot as this one is already a hassle to move out in the spring and back inside in the fall. So I think you can do what you want.


1

Sounds like a very nice tree and worth some consideration. Mark off on the ground where you think your lot line is. Then pace off the distance from the base of the tree to the drip line (extreme-most branches twigs). That gives you the radius of the likely root circle. Now figure what portion of the circle will be affected and express it in percent. Now we ...


1

I would say: no. The tree will regulate itself, maybe with a less growth next summer. If you will remove a lot of roots, on all sides, the things are different. But check also the stability of the tree. If you remove the roots on one side (1 meter is very near), the tree could be unbalanced on the other side (e.g. strong winds, especially on the dig side)....


1

Fall, shortly after the leaves have dropped, is the best time of year to move trees - they then have the entire winter to rebuild roots WITHOUT needing to supply leaves with water from the roots (that are inevitably damaged in transplanting.)


1

Years ago, we did some landscaping and had to trench a water line across our front lawn into our home. In order to do that, we cut through an approx. 8" diameter root of a pine tree, that was probably 30 feet high,and 40 years old. That didn't seem to bother it at all.


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