7

I recently found out about weed torches. They won't get rid of the dirt, but they should make quick work of weeding around rocks and hardscaped areas (that won't catch fire, of course).


6

I'm in the process of sifting gravel out of my backyard where I want a garden and by far, the absolutely best way to sift gravel out, is with a hardware mesh slide. This method was an upgrade from the box with a hardware mesh bottom that I would shake back and forth to separate the rocks from the dirt. The biggest advantage of the slide over the box, is ...


5

It sounds like you are on the right track. Depending on how "small" the gravel bed is, you could dig the gravel into a wheel barrow or trough, and then fill the container with water to float the weeds and "clean" the gravel. Then you'd have to deal with the weed seed bank that has surely developed in the soil under the gravel. Landscape fabric might do it, ...


5

As I said in the comment, suggest you dig it into your allotment - the reason people are taking it is because they know it's valuable either as an addition to making potting compost, or simply using it to add to their own plots. Paradoxically, it wouldn't be great for growing lavender or rosemary - most herb type plants prefer poorer, less nutrient rich soil ...


5

I have 90 tons of rock landscaping in my front yard, and it tends to fill up with dirt because we live on a dirt road. When cars drive by, or when the wind blows hard, the dirt blows, and settles in between the 1-2" rocks. Although we live in the desert, there is the occasional massive rain storm the washes huge amounts of muddy water across the rocks from ...


4

I'm sorry to tell you that your blue star juniper will more than fill that space on its own - the lavender won't take up much room widthways, but the Delosperma (ice plant) would also fill up most of area, so really, there isn't room for anything else. I suggest you remove the blue star juniper altogether - it will spread all over the plant behind it where ...


3

You should start liking the mosses. Very nice and relaxing. And it make your garden have an "alpine look". You may remove it (strong brush), or just turning them, but they will return quickly, unless you try to fight humidity: more sand and stones, less mulch, and maybe you should remove some trees (so having more sun). In such case you may have a more "...


3

I have a bit of a hill in the back yard.Was very hard to mow,mostly mowed the dirt.The area gets sun all afternoon and can get very dry.I hauled a bunch of rocks,different sizes shapes and colors and tried to create what they call a "rocky outcrop" almost like a waterfall effect.Filled it all in with river rock and planted Candytuft and Blue Festuca,the ...


3

It's not a great situation for rock plants, apart from its being out of the way of lots of rain. Hen and Chicks (Sempervivum, or House Leek) is an alpine plant, so it likes a very open situation, full sun, free draining, gritty and poor soil. Most 'rock' type plants are alpines, and all prefer similar conditions. In such a situation as you describe, a better ...


3

For removal of weeds from a small area, the boiling water method works like a charm and I have been using that method for years with great success. I hate using weed killers because of the damage it does to the environment and I have plenty of beautiful frogs around my place to prove that it does work.


3

We live in California City, CA. High dessert with your exact same problem. It is driving me crazy. When we first bought the house, five years ago, the large lot was a blank slate. We had 11 palms, etc. Brought in, put in drip irrigation to about 10 dessert pines and lots of other xeriscape plants. Did a focal point of dry stream bed with large river rock ...


2

Similar to Allen's boiling water method, you could try solarizing the patch, if it gets enough sun. Basically, you'd just lay a clear plastic tarp over the area and roast the seeds to death. It takes a few weeks during hot, sunny weather, but I think this is the least labor-intensive method suggested so far. http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/...


2

To effectively clean out a "drip edge" such as this and bring it back to it's original state, the best bet may be simply to start again. If you save the stone you can wash/sift them off and save a ton of money. But prep the bed again, place some decent metal edging as a barrier between the stones and the garden, and begin refilling the hole. Often times ...


2

They'll be fine, though the transition may be a tough one if all they know is indoors. It will just take some patience and closer attention to get them acclimated. Here's what I would do: 1a) Make sure it's getting enough water. I would poke holes into the surface of the soil with your finger before watering. 1) Try to match the humidity while your plant ...


2

If you have a crate with small enough holes in the bottom, you could shovel the dirt and rocks into the crate, then sift the dirt out. It does get dusty though.


2

If you want to be able to use that space I would reconsider re-using river rock. Tough to put a table or chairs on and certainly hard to walk upon. Much better use of your time would be to dispose of the river rock somewhere on your property that doesn't get much traffic. Or ask your friends or neighbors if they'd like 'free' river rock. They just have ...


2

You could try making all the weed seeds germinate this year. It's late enough so that unless they're perennials or cold-tolerant annuals (or have a very short life-cycle), they should die with the cold without reseeding again (after they germinate this year, that is). If enough of them sprout this year, you may not have a problem next year (that's the hope, ...


1

The reason ponds have plastic containers, rubber liners , and/or concrete is because it works. The only clay lined ponds I have seen are very large ,few to many acres ; where they can be constructed with bulldozers , etc, to compact the clay and may still use rubber liners and very shallow angles on the sides. I have built and a few ponds: For one as small ...


1

Using clay is a time honoured tradition in building ponds. It can be done but can prove problematic if there any possibility of subsidence or water infiltration. The other solution is concrete with steel mesh reinforcing. I live in chilly zone 4 in North America with clay subsoil. If I used bentonite clay after a couple of winters the heave thaw cycle ...


1

Not sure what Lavender de provence is - there's a Lavandula intermedia 'Provence' https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/201924/Lavandula-x-intermedia-Provence/Details so perhaps that's the one you mean. Lavender prefers neutral to alkaline soil conditions, though this particular variety will tolerate more acid conditions. You don't say when you planted your ...


1

Clematis - a big subject, but if you're really asking about how to give your Clematis armandii a good start, then this should help. Dig over the area where you want to plant it, enriching the soil with composted manure - when you dig the hole to plant it dig it a bit deeper than the existing rootball, and once you've turned the (well watered) plant out of ...


1

A sieve. You should be able to find some at your local hardware, generally they stock various sizes. If the material is not very sturdy you could build a frame out of some lumber. Something like chicken mesh might also work depending on the size of the rock.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible