18

Well, it is so easy, it will probably surprise you: Beets and carrots grow partly above the soil, especially when they mature. Especially beets - you may assume that about half of the thick, fleshy part remains exposed. See this picture and note how only the lower part shows traces of soil: (Source) Similar for carrots, but you may have to wipe away a ...


16

Green peppers are not ripe. Even if the seeds are viable (immature pepper seeds can be grown if planted soon after harvesting, but don't have the food storage for long storage), if the pepper is green, it's not ripe. They can ripen to a lot of colors, but the most common is red (for varieties sold for green use). Some varieties were bred to remain green for ...


14

Most root foods don't actually "ripen" and can be harvested at any time. If you're looking to maximize the size of the root, some things like carrots and beets will start to show the crown of the root above ground giving you some indication of their size. Other roots like potatoes is pretty much going to be a trust with timing depending on what size you are ...


9

Usually bell peppers ripen red, orange, yellow or less commonly, brown. Most green peppers that you eat are actually unripe ones that ripen to other colors. Some peppers ripen green, but that is rare. To quote farmerdill on gardenweb, "Just after WW II several green when ripe varieties were introduced to extend the market window." The two green-when-ripe ...


8

You did exactly what I would have recommended. Very ripe bananas especially. I'd enclose them together with the strawberries in a paper bag, close it off with very little airspace, and keep it at at least 75 degrees. Sometimes, however, the ripe part of a strawberry can overripen and begin to decay while part of that same fruit is still white. More common ...


8

Unless they're too immature, they will eventually turn red if you bring them in the house and wait. If you're planning to save seeds, though, people often say that the seeds cease to develop after you've picked them. Nevertheless, seeds from full-sized unripe tomatoes (in my experience) do grow. If they don't look very developed, or if they're particularly ...


7

For carrots it depends on the type. The seed packet will give the best idea on how many days it will take, but here are some general guidelines: Baby carrots: 50-60 days Mature carrots: around 75 days In most cases, you can look for the tops of the carrot to be about 1/2 - 3/4 of an inch in diameter. For beets, again the seed packet will give you a good ...


6

Green tomatoes don't need light to ripen, they need ethylene and heat since they're a climacteric fruit. So, some people uproot the entire plant and hang it upside in the garage. Or, you could pick the green tomatoes and put them into a bag with some ripening bananas to supply the ethylene. However, although they might change color, soften etc, they won't ...


6

When you say its going to freeze, do you mean you're going to have a frost? I don't know what Zone you're in, but it seems unlikely you'll be going straight from cool to the ground freezing solid in a day. Physalis pruinosa is a frost sensitive plant, obviously, but if there's going to be frost tonight,do not pick your ground cherries - cover them with a ...


6

Red peppers are usually considered hotter, but sweeter, than green fruits. Here is a thread where everyone agrees on that point. But the heat level often goes along with the stress level of the plant. most of the people on this thread also think red is hotter. If you water only minimally, grow the plant in scorching sun, and are skimpy on the fertilizer, you ...


6

In order to deal with harmful insects & birds you can make a scaffold around strawberries and cover them by plastic or PEfilm like greenhouses. IMO, if you give them time to ripe, keep the temperature between 15-25 ^C and sunlight their color completely will be red. Edit: more clarified.


5

Generally when the fruit is no longer green and releases easily from the tree it is ready. If it doesn't come off with a gentle tug wait a couple of days and try again. The small size is probably due to no one thinning the fruit earlier in the season.


4

Capsicum annuum definitely does. I've a feeling Capsicum frutescens (Tabascoes et al) do, but I'm not sure. When I've grown them, I've tended to eat or freeze them immediately.


4

Squash varieties in the same species freely cross. If you want to save your seeds for reuse, you have to grow only one variety from each species -- and hope that none of your nearby neighbors grows squash. Note that a single species can have varieties that include summer, winter, and ornamental fruit. The shape of the fruit is determined solely by the ...


4

Yes, just like tomatoes, it should help redirect the plant's energy into ripening what's there rather than growing on burgeoning fruits from flowers. You can remove the leaves and stems above the existing fruits you want to keep as well, which also helps.


3

Okay, I answered thinking you were talking about cherries from a tree, did not think right this morning. So I am completely redoing my answer. So... We grow our own ground cherries and I can say they WILL ripen if picked green. There will be some that fall on the ground and still be pretty green, with slight yellow. Just put them in a box and within 2 weeks ...


3

The main thing that chillis require is heat, your feeding it ok, although I would recommend a liquid feed with a bit more potassium in it, a tomato feed would be a good start, also keeping fruit on the plant for too long can inhibit fruit production- they will ripen on their own eventually, but my own concern that on a balcony, that outside winds are cooling ...


3

Avocados don't ripen on trees, so as @GrahamChiu said, you need to pick it and let it ripen. It may be that the owner has deliberately left them on the tree to extend his eating season, as (apparently), they can survive 3 months on the tree waiting to be picked. Different avos have different ripening characteristics - some (like Hass) go dark. Most give ...


3

Assuming that you have sought permission from the tree's owner, then I'd suggest looking for a large enough avocado with a slightly pebbly skin. Avocados don't ripen on the tree but once they're picked. If it ripens within a week, then you've picked at the right time. It will still go soft if you pick it earlier, but there may be little taste present.


3

In my experience, squash will ripen off the vine if their shelf life is long enough, but they will not get bigger (and according to many, the seeds may not, or will not, develop further). C. pepo and C. ficifolia certainly ripen further off the vine, anyway. (I've had Tatume squash and zucchini, which are C. pepo, turn orange after sitting in storage) I'm ...


3

Unless you are a farmer producing for some bulk processing use, odds are high that you'll harvest over a period of time anyway. As such, yanking a sample is not detrimental to the overall harvest - it's part of it. If you are a farmer, you'd be sampling anyway. Both beets and carrots normally need thinning (reduction of plants in the row/bed to allow ...


3

When peaches are ready depends a lot on your tastes. However, if they're falling off the tree in large numbers, and you want to save all the peaches, it's probably a good idea to start picking them (or you'll lose a lot). You might just put something below to catch them and cushion their fall, and then shake off the ones that are loose; you can let the ...


3

You should be using NPK fertiliser, preferably a commercially produced tomato food, or at least something with an NPK roughly approaching 10-10-18 for a liquid feed, or 18-18-21 for a foliar spray. Your average temperatures and hours of sunlight also make a difference - in the UK, in summer, average ripening time from swelling of the fruit to full ripeness ...


3

Where are you located? What kind of temperatures are your plants growing in? Tomatoes like temps in the 60-80 degree range (60s or better at night, 80s during the day) for best growth. If temps are very far outside this range on either side, it may have problems ripening fruit.


3

The fruit will signal that it is ripe by turning a good yellow colour and filling the room with a sweet pineapple odour. At that time it is perfect for cutting. When you cut, examine the top of the fruit for slips - shoots that may appear in the top foliage. If present, tease one or more off carefully with its base intact and sit it in potting compost where ...


2

A red chilli is just a ripe green chilli, or a green chilli is just an under-ripe red or yellow chilli.


2

Chillis are not climacteric fruits so can be removed from your list. https://www.mpg.de/5934313/peppers_ethylene_maturity


2

This is Citrus Limon Improved Meyer Lemon. It IS a cross between lemon and mandarin orange...check it out when you discuss how this plant was grown, maintained, all chemicals. This is the sweetest of lemons and pretty tough plants, very forgiving. To a point...I've been ordering seeds and came across this lemon I have actually seen whilst working at a ...


2

Unless you have a small variety of tomatoes, they're likely to be immature and will never ripen off the vine. If they're mature and still green, then they will ripen off the vine. Keep them in the dark covered with some newspaper to minimize the loss of ethylene, at a temperature of 68°F to 77°F. Outside this range the ripening slows down, or completely ...


2

If it's brown, it's probably not going to change color again. It's ripe. You can save the seeds and eat it. Many hot peppers, though not ripe when green, are still usable for culinary purposes when green (some may taste better green, or some color that isn't their final color)—but you'll want to wait until they change their final color (or at least start to ...


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