10

This site from Washington State University offers a wealth of information about apples and their uses. You'll find a long list of apple varieties, including type descriptions and whether they're best used for long storage; eating; cooking, as in pies and applesauce; and cider. I don't know where you live, and some of these are regionalized to western United ...


7

Here are three apple books I would recommend for detailed info about different varieties: The New Book of Apples by Joan Morgan - It's expensive but well worth the investment. Apples of Uncommon Character by Rowan Jacobson Apples of North America by Tom Burford You can find these and other fantastic books here. You can also see if your public library ...


6

In this case, I would say there will be no problems. In general it is better not to repeat the same family of vegetables on the same spot (depletion of soil), and better not to have same families together (diseases). Some combination are nice because of different growth rates (greens between slow growing vegetables, helps keeping away weeds, and keeping ...


5

You can't beat RHS (Royal Horticultural Society) publications if you're in the UK - there's one called RHS Propagating Plants by Alan Toogood (available on Amazon), also RHS Handbook: Propagation Techniques, again available at Amazon, also available as a Kindle download.


5

University or community college courses in landscape architecture or garden design are available in many countries. I have found that practical experience is at least as valuable. If you look around you might be able to find a historical garden maintained by volunteers. Oh, and there's this place where you ask and answer questions. Maybe you have heard of ...


4

The closest I can find is PlantFiles, which is a huge database, and covers these criteria: Height Spacing Hardiness Sun Exposure Danger Bloom Color Bloom Time Foliage Other details Soil pH requirements Patent Information Propagation Methods Seed Collecting


4

You're definitely missing something; your information is incomplete. You've mentioned evaporation (from the soil, presumably) but not transpiration. Plants need water, it's the stuff of life - they need it for the process of transpiration and carbon exchange, they need it to keep plant tissues hydrated via the xylem and phloem, they need it for the ...


4

I enjoyed Secrets of Plant Propagation: Starting Your Own Flowers, Vegetables, Fruits, Berries, Shrubs, Trees, and Houseplants by Lewis Hill. It is packed pretty densely with images of different propagation tactics for all sorts of plants. May be lacking in some of the more modern techniques but still a great resource that's easy to understand.


3

Sources of variatal information for apples. Agricultural Research Services Germplasm Resources Information Network. This is the most comprehensive list I found -- and it still misses 50% of the varieties I was seeking information on. http://www.ars-grin.gov/ Big Horse Creek Farm Descriptions of about 300 varieties. http://bighorsecreekfarm.com/apple-...


3

You should at the very least take a Master Gardener Course from your state's extension service. Most people have no idea what is involved in 'Landscape Design'...nor maintenance. Thus you will find yourself if you've no education grouped with all those making money using a pickup and mower. The more education you get under your belt, the more humble yet ...


3

This is outside my area of expertise, but, living where you do, obviously greenhouse growing will be necessary for the more tender plants like basil. A large proportion of horticultural work is done by hand - handling small plants is tender work, and whether a machine could ever repot a plant into a larger container, or plant out tiny seedlings in rows in ...


2

You might find Longman Botany Handbook by Andrew Sugden(ISBN 0-582-09965-X) useful - doesn't have any 'how to' parts, but does contain a significant amount of purely botanical terminology, with explanation, so it's much more like a dictionary, just with more information and illustrations. I just checked - it seems it's now only available second hand, and ...


2

I don't know of any book that completely answers your question, but there are a few generally helpful books that cover some of the terminology. Some also, however, contain some info on how-to's, which parts will not be of use. My recommendations concerning terminology definitions: Taylor's Dictionary for Gardeners covers some oft-used terminology. From ...


2

Try Visual Dictionary Online, section Plants and Gardening. It contains zillion of botany-related diagrams. For example, there is a diagram explaining structure of a mushroom. It explains following mushroom-related terms: spores stem gill mycelium hypha volva ring All diagrams are arranged in a hierarchical order, and easy to find. On top of that, for ...


2

I've developed www.ifweather.com for managing custom weather alerts and sending email just like you describe. It isn't free, but it's the best option for managing many alerts for more than one location that I've found. It currently has the ability to watch the forecast for temperature and precipitation conditions. When the conditions you specify are ...


1

I love the Johnny's Selected Seeds company and their free catalog for this reason among many others. The pictures are pretty, it's got entertaining and educational tidbits mixed among the products, and they have tons of great plants. On the seed descriptions the first thing after the name of the seeds is the days to maturity. They also have ideal seed ...


1

You've said the deck is at ground level, so it is possible to replace it with paving slabs. However, laying slabs involves a lot of work and cost; there's the digging out, the aggregate then concrete mix to go beneath the slabs, and then the slabs as well. If you wanted pavers, they should be laid on sand, but probably you'd still need to do some digging out ...


1

My father-in-law used a non-slip deck paint very much like the one shown below to coat his home's deck, porch, and stairs. Some specs: Type: One-part polyurethane nonskid enamel Finish: Low sheen Solids by Volume: 54% Coverage: 94sq.ft/qt Aggregate: Fine mineral bits It works as advertised and has lasted more than a few years now (in full sun, too). Its ...


1

Prairie Magic: Was removed from my orchard due to vulnerability to fire blight. September Ruby keeps for 8-10 weeks. Can be over productive, must be thinned to obtain size 6.5 cm average. FB rating of F5 but has recovered from an infection. annually productive if thinned. Very hardy. Flavour is moderately acid and good for dessert.


1

Have you considered making your deck into a permanent 'outdoor' room? Something that will vastly increase the value of your home as well as saleability, be able to grow vegetables or exotic plants in beautiful pots and raised planters year 'round, add a few pieces of comfortable furniture so you can entertain or go hide from the world in an elegant, glass ...


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