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6

Looks like it should be the carburetor bowl (where fuel is metered in by a float valve to be available to get sucked into the carburetor jets - either of which can get clogged if you did't drain the fuel before storage or run a fuel stabilizer before storage - and sometimes even if you did.)


5

The best way to deal with this plant is to grow it under higher light conditions so it does not get so etiolated or leggy. This species is robust so you can cut the stems back where they come out from the main stem and root them in water. You could probably cut the long stretched out stems into six inch chunks and root them in water even if they do not ...


5

There is no need to seal the holes at all. The natural healing process that woody plants use is to grow around the wound and eventually cover it over. Standards for good pruning practices around the world are to not use wound paint of any sort. It can act to hold moisture in and promote fungus and decay agents. Take a break and let nature do the job for ...


5

I would just leave it. This happens in the wild and plants are fine. It looks like a fairly new/small plant so pruning that much leaf structure might do more harm than good. If it's lacking support or if the leaf is pulling apart because of it's own weight then you could prop it up or tie a string around the plant to keep the leaves from falling.


5

Succulents do not 'heal' in the traditional sense from cracks or tears. Leave it be, unless it is starting to rot, and hopefully the plant will continue to grow and a new leaf will come up. You could trim the damaged leaf at the stem, but this is not necessary and will just turn brown.


5

In the north ( eg. Chicago) ,catalpas are often severely pruned and tolerate it well ; so loosing a couple branches will do no lasting harm. I would only clean up the broken stump. Footnote : When I first went birdwatching at High Island TX, It took me awhile to figure what the 75 ft trees with flowers were because I had never seen an un -pruned catalpa ...


4

Replace it with drip emitter tubing. Soaker hoses suck. They put out more water in the start of the hose than they do at the end, leading to inconsistent watering that can hurt your plants. With drip emitter tubing, drip emitters are molded into the tubing. The emitters should be pressure compensating which ensures that you get even distribution throughout ...


4

Perhaps pre-paving prevention is (or should be) the best plan in the first place. Speaking from experience, about my own weedy paving problem (which has occurred after a lot of hard work paving a large area a few years ago), a base-mix of dry sand and cement would have done a lot to prevent all the weed-seeds in the soil growing into problem weeds. A half ...


4

I bought air tubing at the hardware store that was was big enough to fit fairly snug inside the soaker hose. I cut off a 4 inch piece of the air tubing, covered the outside liberally with silicone adhesive and pushed it halfway into one end of the severed soaker hose. Then I pushed the other severed end onto the other half of the air tubing until the ...


3

The cut part cannot regrow a top to look like it was before, but the remaining portion of the arm can make more arms and continue growing that way. Depending on your climate, it may take a few days or a few weeks for the wound to dry out and form a callus. If you think it'll take a while to dry out, you can dust it with some anti-fungal powder (commonly ...


3

Two possibilities. One, it could be normal die back from the cut point, or Two, it could be a fungal disease that has entered the cut point. A Copper based powder can help to kill any fungal disease. Also, if you're trimming your basil, don't water from above. Water at base of plant so you don't get moisture in the cut sections of the plant. Moisture will ...


3

If your water is hard, you may find that calcium deposits have blocked the holes. Perhaps you can soak them into a vinegar solution of distilled/rain water over night to see if you can dissolve the concretions. Or, even try coca cola ... though I don't know what all those acids will do to your drippers. And you perhaps should put some kind of filter on ...


3

You can test your magneto (can also be called a coil) directly to see if it works. If you have the coil off of the engine, you can do a resistance test on it to see if it's fried. I don't know what the exact make of the engine is, since Craftsman power tools utilize many different brands and re-brands them. It could be a Briggs and Stratton, but more than ...


3

I've tried the polymeric sand but it doesn't work. Ants dig through and weeds pop up. Don't spend your money. Spray with vinegar, but only when the sun is shining, not when it's cloudy.


3

Buy two ordinary hose repair fittings and a section of hose (soaker or not.) Cut out a section, replace with the new section and two repair couplings.


3

The metal part you are holding is the outer non-kinking protective pipe. There should be a flexible rubbery tube inside. I hope it hasn't retreated far down the pipe because it has to go over the barb on the fitting shown. Once the tubing is on, then you can see if it just compresses against the outer pipe (most likely) or needs a special part.


3

No guarantees, I'm afraid, but it should survive if all the bark hasn't been removed around the tree. The RHS have an informative article on ring-barking here.


2

Not sure where you are, but if a soaker hose were left buried for one season here, in the Pacific Northwet, it would be crumbling bits not worth saving. If it has been eight years and you can still identify the hose, you must be somewhere very dry. Brand new, medium duty soaker hoses are about $12 for 50 feet. It would be instructive to figure out what ...


2

You can test the spark using a short test lead with alligator clips. Remove the spark plug, reconnect the plug wire and using the test lead, connect the plug ground electrode to a good engine ground point. Turn on the ignition switch and pull the starting cord quickly. You should see a spark in the plug gap. Since the spark may be faint, it may help to do ...


2

There are drip irrigation parts that the soaker hose fits into. The one you want is usually called a compression 'coupling'. They should only be $1 each - some are pricey online (sort of boutique drip irrigation prices). Go to an irrigation supply store, or even some large box stores have them. They are much cheaper than any of the other suggestions, as ...


2

It's not a problem. The tree will protect itself from the wounds, which by your description seem fairly minor (unless it is a small, immature tree). Room temperature vulcanizing silicone releases a small amount of acetic acid while curing. While it is toxic and slightly corrosive, the small amount released by a siliconized latex caulk compared to a non-...


2

a flat dual stream soaker hose doesn't respond to most of the couplings available for the single stream variety. A possible solution- insert a suitable sized gas line hose ( a poly type that has been wiped with a silicone-to aid with the insertion into each of the severed pores ( all 4) join- tape with ready-fix type plumbing tape- then secure with an ...


2

Here's what I ended up doing: Materials: steel pipe outdoor grade duct tape 50lb UV resistant nylon zip ties strips of rag The hard part was pulling the stem back up, as it not only weighed over 100 lbs, but had put on a growth ring in that position. Here's to hoping that I didn't cause too much damage in the process. I trimmed up the jagged edges on ...


2

The Aloe vera is a succulent that has naturalized across the world from China to North and South America. It "requires well-drained, sandy potting soil and bright, sunny conditions". We have a few questions here about watering and soil mix that are relevant. This plant has root rot brought on by too much water in a soil that has too much organic matter ...


2

The likely cause of the leaf problem you have is environmental, that is, the care it's receiving. First, I suspect this plant is not receiving sufficient daylight and probably sunlight - they really need 5 or 6 hours of sun a day, which can be difficult if you're in the northern hemisphere, as it's winter. The second problem might be insufficient water, ...


2

That model or a similar appearing model has the battery cover/cowl snap/clip on, so maybe try wriggle it a bit, as any debris shouldn't impede removal too much: the grooves may be spring detents, and the holes could have screws down in them, or simply plastic clips. then to put it back on, clip it back into place & check that its held on ok. Please be ...


2

What makes you think it is 2 cycle ? I would just cut the end of the hose for a test run. As a minimum remove the carb float bowl and clean it out ( the big round thing just below where the hose broke off ). Generally ,2 cycles do not have floats ; the one I have handy does not have a float bowl. Very encouraging that you could get a pop by putting gas into ...


2

The rubber tube is for the gas/benzine. Replace all tube (and possibly other rubber tubes). You may find tubes in plastic (e.g. transparent), for gas: they have a longer lifetime. But your carburator is probably dirt (and possibly also some other gas filters). Rubber tubes at end-of-life can cause such problems, and also the rust. And there is much rust. You ...


1

Succulents often can root themselves from a leaf, or more, so bury the leaves in the ground a little bit, and it should root.


1

Using weed killer is of course the easiest option, but personally I am not a big fan of these toxic substances in your garden (maybe you want to grow vegetables as well in the near future, or you have kids or pets running around). The old fashion way (people have been using it for thousands of years), is first plough up or dig up the soil. Weeds will be ...


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