6

If it's on council land, there's not much you can do. Your tree has been pollarded. Because it's a willow tree, it should recover well. These trees take this pruning well, and it's actually a common (albeit rather unattractive) size management system in many areas.


4

Pruning a plant suffering from transplant shock is often a good idea. If your plant is recovering, I wouldn't worry about it too much, though. Just prune according to normal guidelines for peppers. In my experience plants that have experienced transplant shock can benefit from pruning in order to reduce the shock, and also to promote new growth if the plant ...


2

I see two things in the picture that you could provide more details on: the small white spots on the dying frond look like an armoured scale or possibly mealybug the dying area (necrotic in plant talk) which consists of a dead brown circular area surrounded by a newer yellowing area. This looks like virus/fungus/bacteria from over watering Inspect the ...


2

Depends how long the ply and soil are sitting on top of the hostas - if its just a short period (2-3 months), they'll be fine, though they may have disappeared or look terrible when uncovered again. If its a lot longer, say 9 months to a year, then its anybody's guess whether they'll grow again - the odds are that they will, but no guarantees.


2

We, own a willow. Every 2 years we pollard it back in winter when it is sleeping. A month or two it shows signs of sprouting again. By late February, beginning of March it's sprouting with leaves. Providing it is regularly attended to and looked after it will bounce back wonderfully. P. S. Don't forget to water well in summer if not near stream as the roots ...


2

I've had the same Haworthia for over 10 years now. During that time I have: Overwatered Underwatered Put it into too large a pot, which led to root rot Dumped the rotted plant out onto a garden bed in full sun And it did not die. In fact, should you ever overwater the plant until it gets root rot, I recommend just tossing the rosettes someplace in your ...


2

I think you went a bit too extreme to the other side ;) dry tips often indicate either sun damage or underwatering. Move it to a shadier place and water it. ps. a sign of overwatering would be yellowish leaves, which I don't think you've experienced.


1

One definite problem is the aspect - east facing, together with exposure to winds which are likely cold from December through to spring are conditions almost guaranteed to cause bud drop, leaf burn and reduced flowering. The reason east facing is such a bad position is because any frost that may form on the buds overnight does not have time to dissipate ...


1

Usually when a Norfolk Island Pine branch tips start curling like that it indicates that at some time the root ball became too dry. If the foliage becomes crispy then it went too far into dryness, otherwise you are in with a chance. It only takes one drought incident and might have occurred when you transplanted if there was a lot of damage to the root ball ...


1

I don't think frost will damage it. I noticed that on spring the Redwood tend to brownish, but later in end spring it will return green (blue green at the beginning).


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