10

Plant them so that the top of the root ball is level with the surface of the soil, pretty much as you would any other potted plant. Water them well between now and when cold weather arrives and they will do fine. I would get them in the ground as soon as you can because, unlike bare root plants, they are not dormant right now. As for other advice...some ...


8

Don't overthink it. They transplant reasonably well, as in, take a shovel, dig em up, replant quickly without giving the roots time to dry out (or dig up, heel in to keep the roots moist, then plant - but if you can do it in one step it's less work for you, less shock for them.) I would question why that row is fading - if it just needed severely pruned, ...


7

First year canes grow. Second year canes develop side shoots with flower buds. Third year canes may develop side shoots in a lot less quantity (diminished crop), but in domesticated Raspberries usually die. Removal is the best policy. Unless you're dealing with wild black cap Rasberries, this is the standard growth cycle. You can propagate by letting the ...


7

We've grown Autumn Bliss for years - it's a great variety! Yes, you should be able to prune now. Once a cane has fruited and you have taken all the fruit you want from it, cut it down to near the ground. It will not fruit properly again, and will probably die on its own over the winter anyway, so you aren't really losing anything, especially once the new ...


7

The likelihood of disease is not more likely when planted in close quarters, but if one species contracts a disease, it will likely pass it on. To avoid this, planting them apart should do it, anywhere that no blown leaves/running soil will reach them. Now I don't worry about it myself, I put everything together. Disease control in untreatable diseases ...


7

It's a water problem, specifically, not enough, evidenced by the browning edges on the leaves and the shrivelled fruits. Once the berries start forming, you need to keep the plant well supplied with water, or the fruit will atrophy on the stem. You say you bought the plant earlier this year, so the fact it's only been planted this year also means it has a ...


7

I am zone USDA zone 3 b to 4 and you can't kill blackberry plants. I have mine growing with morning sun in a raised bed beside a concrete foundation. Every year, dead to the ground, every year eight to nine feet tall in the autumn. Don't bother with any extra work, cut them back to the ground in the fall and stand back in the spring. I do top dress with ...


6

Aphids inhabit leaves and shoots, particularly new shoots - ants 'farm' them to collect their honeydew, so it might be that the tiny black flies are actually aphids. I've magnified the pictures, but can't see clearly what the little black thing is, but they are most likely aphids - they tend not to move because they're sucking sap from your plant. Seems odd ...


6

They will grow to a normal size if they are given about 8 cubic feet (2'x2'x2') of good topsoil. Potting soil has to be fertilized more often. Keep them moist and give them at least a half day of sun for best production. You can use grow bags, but pots or planters are more stable and work better long term. I experimented with this and found that I could grow ...


6

Trim the old canes close to the ground. First, you don't want the plant to invest any of its energy into maintaining these old canes. You want the energy to go into the new canes. Second, if you leave them, they will dry out and may rot in wet weather. With decreased air circulation, the rot may spread to the healthy young canes.


6

Ants aren't typically trouble for plants themselves. They do like sweet things, of course, and would be attracted to the fruit but I've not seen them destroy plants themselves. Could be aphids. The honeydew produced by the aphids is something the ants like. Ants have this interesting relationship with aphids. The aphids produce the honeydew and the ants ...


6

Cool. I like raspberries and those brambles tend to grow pretty well if they are watered well and the soil pH is right and they get enough sunlight. I'd have probably planted them a bit farther out from the house but that's a nit, really. Their roots get pretty long - a few feet or more and they do well if they are in soil that drains well. As long as ...


5

A light spunbonded poly agricultural fabric, placed over the patch after pollination, might keep some of these insects off of your ripening fruit. It acts as a physical barrier without weighing down the plants. Rain and most of the light pass right on through. I've used it in this manner to keep aphids off my coles and other greens.


5

Can blueberries and raspberries be planted near each other? Yes. I wouldn't plant them on top of each other, but they can be planted next to each other. I routinely have blackberry popping up like weeds in my blueberry stand. if I am watering the blueberries will any acidic fertilizer I give them cause problems for the raspberries? There is a lot of ...


5

Yes, in short. These fruiting plants are not natural bedfellows: Raspberries prefer alkaline soil conditions, so the acidity required to grow blueberries successfully will not suit them. You could plant Blackberries instead of blueberries, they will thrive where raspberries do, and plant the blueberry elsewhere.


5

I can't tell properly from the photograph, but the third photo does suggest you have your raspberry planted in what appears to be a trough. If you have, troughs aren't usually any deeper than 8 inches at most, more often 4-6 inches, and that is no way deep enough for a raspberry plant. The leaves are curling upwards rather than down, so it doesn't seem to ...


5

I had similar holes in my raspberry plants, but I did not locate the actual insect. However, according to this article, it may be small carpenter bees: Happily, in the case of these bees, the answer is no[, they do not cause damage]. They make their nests in dead tissue, excavating the soft center pith of twigs. They then lay eggs in these nests and ...


5

I never mulched reds, yellows or blacks in the Chicago area. The only problem was the rabbits ate them when there was snow cover on the ground.


4

General practice with raspberries is to remove all of the canes that have already fruited by cutting them to the ground, so that new more vigorous canes can take their place. Canes that arise this year will fruit next year, and last year's brand new canes will fruit this year, so be sure to retain those. Older canes on some varieties might fruit again, but ...


4

Frankly, I don't agree with the premise that blackberries and raspberries planted together are more subject to disease. I've worked in many gardens where blackberries are trained up a trellis or fence (being large, trailing plants), with raspberry bushes 3-5 feet in front, in the same bed. The only drawback with it is that raspberries tend to spread by ...


4

Honestly rubrus are one of the easiest to establish. The hardest part of them is getting rid of them where you don't want them. Digging up the root balls has very little advantage. You can just cut the canes off, and lay them down in a shallow trench where you want them and most of the nodes will develop into a new clone of the plant. If you really want, ...


4

Not a nutrient deficiency, more like a drought problem, or that cane is an original one on the plant when you got it, possibly last year's or the year before's cane. The taller, bushy one is newer and younger. Otherwise, some sort of damage or problem with the stem on that one. UPDATE: Oh dear, Jojo, never mind, not much you can do now. That brown growth at ...


4

Raspberries are best propogated vegetatively. Leave the seed production to experts as they are able to control what plant fertilizes a desired plant. NOT an easy thing to do. Most gardeners purchase bare root stems to start their own raspberry patch. Easy-peasy and you are ensured the correct species. Making seeds to grow is a stretch for even the most ...


4

Another thing to keep in mind is older canes may harbor insect pests (borers, for example) and allow them to overwinter in your raspberry patch, making the next year's fight against infestation a lot harder. So, not only prune the old canes, but REMOVE them far away from the growing site.


4

I am trying to do clone cuttings now too using rooting hormone. I've ran across some people saying they did it, but now how they did it. You can find out more on Tipping ( bending the plant over and putting the tip in the dirt until it grows) and air layering. Have yo had any success yet? I'll let you know if I get mine to grow.


4

White Drupelet syndrome (white spot) has the cell fully formed, no powdery residue, but the color is white instead of the normal color. It's caused by excessive sunlight (UV damage) or heat and is typically found on late season set raspberries. I view it as a normal end-of-crop phenomenon that indicates cane maintenance will be in order soon for next year's ...


4

I discourage the idea. The moment a cane's tip touches the ground, the plant is seriously tempted to grow roots. Plus, the canes bend easily while young, once they mature, they tend to break or get otherwise damaged. So while you can easily bend them down now, it might be not so easy to get them bach up again. Note that many gardeners see at least their ...


4

The traditional way summer-fruiting raspberries were grown outside in the UK, the suckers are essential. At the end of each season, you cut off all the old canes that have fruited, and the new canes (your suckers) flower and fruit the following year. To grow them that way, you don't need to dig them up and replant them. The plant just renews itself with ...


3

My guess is that you've got leaf roller caterpillars doing that. I've had them infest some of my plants before. If you pry the leaves open, you might see the caterpillar wiggle its way off the leaf pretty quickly. They can destroy a plant - my young grapevine cuttings had them two years ago. I ended up snipping off the bad leaves completely. I tried ...


3

The two plants can be placed near each other, but you may want to place some barrier underground to keep the raspberries from expanding. I have blueberries growing about 3 feet from my raspberries, with a small patch of grass between them. Both plants seem to be doing fine, but I regularly need to pull out little raspberry shoots that come up right next to ...


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