4

I have some experience with this, I think - I am in London, UK, and I tend a plot in an allotment next to a small river, and I am pretty much at the lowest point in the allotment, or I was, but more about that. It used to flood badly every winter, not least because it is, like much of London, on dense clay. Digging the soil the first year was like digging ...


3

English Ivy will grow anywhere (at least in the UK, and your profile says you are in London). If you are trying to save a bit of money by filling the base of the planter with it, don't try that idea!


3

Compost is not "solid" material. It may be 40% water, and also contains a lot of air unless it has been compacted. The organic material in the compost is gradually decomposed by micro-organisms into chemicals which are soluble in water and can be absorbed by the plants growing in the bed. The chemical composition of compost is mainly carbon, ...


3

Adding the ashes from your barbeque has to be done in small amounts and not often, and only if you know what your soil ph is beforehand, because ashes are alkaline and will affect soil ph. Some vegetables like alkaline soils (mustard greens, cabbage,cauliflower), or at least a ph value between 7.0 and 8.0, but other vegetables do not. If you have a compost ...


3

This answer assumes that you'll be planting ornamentals, not vegetables. If you're more interested in vegetables, then I would relocate the garden and not try raised beds in that area (after all, would you really like to slog through that muck to pick veggies?) For ornamentals, another version of Peter's quote is really landscape design 101: "Right ...


2

The sort of plants you can grow in your garden will depend on just how wet it is. If you're only talking about the occasional flood you may well be able to get away with a lawn or what you call a "traditional garden". Don't forget that many plants prefer wet or boggy soil. Rather than going for an engineering solution, such as raised beds, why not ...


2

One solution I once saw (and it is not my idea, but seems to work) with raised beds is to designate a rotation pattern (say squash, potatoes, corn, beans, roots) and load all the manure onto the year 1 bed. The idea is that squash can tolerate a lot of fresh-ish manure, spuds can handle it after a year, corn after 2 years and so on. So in a given year only ...


2

I am not completely sure what you mean by using three racks, but I'm picturing something like your innovative door-turned shelf at your three specified heights all on your deck. If my mind's picture is what you are suggesting, I do not think there is much danger in setting up a vertical garden in this way, but I think you will be constrained by space and ...


1

Although it's often said that pillbugs (AKA rollypollies) are harmless, they will mow down seedlings, sometimes, especially if there's a lot of uncomposted organic matter near them. To stop them from doing this, just pick up all the pillbugs and put them somewhere else. Then, remove all the uncomposted organic matter from around the seedlings (so as not to ...


1

Looks like sap from when the board was freshly cut. Not a problem.


1

None of the answers seem to directly address the specifics of a raised bed. My yard has very poorly draining soil and lots of rabbits so I decided to build a raised bed. I wanted it to drain well and I wanted it fairly high to keep the rabbits out and not having to kneel to tend it. On each side of the bed I used 2 cedar 2X12 boards stacked with pre-made ...


1

I have a raised bed directly up against the concrete foundation of my garage. A little background information: The garage is on a small hill, so the foundation is about three feet high; the raised bed is against two feet of the foundation, with one foot exposed above it. Above that is a dark-green wooden clapboard wall. The bed and garage are in full sun, ...


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