15

Pumpkins are easy to compost. If they were used for crafts/decoration, it's possible that they contain inorganic matter such as paint, ribbon, candle wax, plastic twine, foil, etc. Make sure all such material (if any) is removed. The seeds will survive all but the hottest compost heaps, and can be a nuisance later. I don't usually worry about it, and pull ...


9

Once the vine starts to die back, that is a useful indicator that they are ready or nearly ready. Other indicators of a ripe pumpkin include: It should sound a bit hollow when you slap it The stem should be hard and start to have cracks in it Pressing the skin with a fingernail should dent but not puncture


7

Dry them off and put them on a paper towel. If they still sprout, you can plant them then.


6

If you leave a tomato on the vine too long, it may split, or a critter may come and eat it in the night. Pumpkins and their ilk don't suffer from either problem, so you can leave them as long as you want. The colour change is a big clue, but most people leave them until there is no chance of them growing any more. In the late fall when we have a hard frost ...


6

It's kind of difficult to gauge without a pic, but if you know for a fact they were pumpkin seeds, it's one of two things: 1. Your Original seed was an F1 hybrid and the progeny will almost never come true from seed. or 2. If your seed was from homogeneous seed stock, what you have is the result of cross pollination, where the pollen from another gourd (...


5

From the images and description, this most likely represents an infection by Fusarium solani f. sp. cucurbitae. The first symptom usually noticed in the field is wilting of the leaves. Within several days, the entire plant may wilt and die. If the soil is removed from around the base of the plant, a very distinct necrotic rot of the crown and upper ...


4

I think 70-day pumpkins are the earliest you're going to find. If you don't care if they're ripe, you might try it anyway. If you do some light carving on the skin after the fruit gets to a desirable size, before harvest, it might ripen faster (I've read that damaged fruits tend to ripen faster, and it seems to be true). Fruits with blossom end rot ripen ...


4

If the holes are round, it may be flea beetles. If the holes are irregular (and still in the middle of the leaf) it could be caterpillars. You have to send pictures. If the holes are round and cross-over the veins, it could be leaf-spot, a fungus. Happening overnight rules out leaf-spot, I think. Normally, this is nothing to worry about. It is, ...


3

Yellowing of leaves can be caused by nutrient deficiencies and bugs. Check carefully for squash bugs, and try giving some balanced NPK to your plant.


3

How sure are you it was rats? Because they will eat the flesh as well as the seeds, whereas chipmunks and squirrels tend to prefer the seeds... mice and voles also like the seeds. There is some guidance here http://pumpkinnook.com/howto/gardenpests.htm in regard to deterring such pests.


3

I don't know about Big Max, specifically, but I believe that 40-55 days is the general time from pollination to fruit maturity for pumpkins. Extrapolating on that and the 110-day time to maturity for Big Max, I would assume that you would expect pollination to happen around 7-8 weeks after seed germination. If you look at the vines, you should be able to ...


3

What do the vines, themselves, look like? Are they turning brown and shriveling or rotting? The biggest problem I have with pumpkins and squash are squash vine borers. The moth lays eggs on a stem, the larvae burrow into the vines and eat out the middle of the vines, killing them. You'll see a small hole right at the base/border of a branch of the vine, ...


3

Pumpkin plants normally put out female flowers when the plant is large enough to support the pumpkin. Pollen can be frozen, and it's best done when dried first. How long it lasts though depends on the variety of plant unless you have the resources of the seed vaults available to you. It won't hurt to try saving the pollen. Collect the pollen first thing ...


3

In order for a seed to germinate it needs to imbibe sufficient water to rehydrate the food sources and molecular machinery inside the seed, and this results in the seed swelling. This is also a temperature sensitive process. So, if the seed hasn't swollen, dry it off to prevent it imbibing any water and store in a cool location.


3

Disclaimer: This will likely be closed as duplicate. Those are aphids - while a few won't hurt a healthy plant, they tend to multiply and then drink so much of the plant sap that they can cause damage. For small colonies and few plants, you can simply wipe them off. On a larger scale, you might have to resort to spraying an insecticide. (There are "non ...


3

Turns out this isn't really a problem. (I waited to see if any of the commentors who suggested this would post an answer) It's unusual that male pumpkins bloom after the female ones but not unheard of. A matter of weeks after posting this question I started to get many male and some female blooms in a much more expected pattern.


3

I don't know what's going on with your pumpkin. Usually male flowers form and bloom first, except for some varieties, maybe. Maybe it's a partially gynoecious variety, which would mean it should mostly produce female flowers. It might be a mutant, though, or maybe there is a pest or disease that is influencing it with regulators. If you'll plant this kind ...


2

If you aren't hand-pollinating, a possible answer is that the pumpkins weren't pollinated well enough. If the female flowers don't receive adequate pollination they plant may try to put out a fruit but it may abort partway through the process. Plant stress is also a possibility from pests, inadequate watering, or poor soil. A few links that may help ...


2

That's a female flower that hasn't opened yet. If the flower opens and is pollinated, a fruit will start to grow, but if the flower isn't pollinated, the fruit will just wither. Male flowers have much smaller bulbs at the base which are narrower than the blossom, whereas females have an immature fruit directly beneath the flower. When the flower opens, it ...


2

Squash family does not like to have their roots disturbed. Turning a plant out of its pot for planting outside is not a problem provided the pot is fairly full of roots, but separating seedlings like that is asking for trouble. An alternate process is to still put 2 seeds to a pot (germination will be often 2, sometimes 0 but nearly always at least 1), but ...


2

I suggest to plant them when the weather first permits. This way if your first few vines fail after a couple of weeks you will have enough time remaining in the growing season to try a second batch of pumpkins. I planted pumpkins in April and actually have a few "Jack-be-little" pumpkins to harvest at the time of writing this. I know they are ripe ...


2

The wilting is likely due to the fact the plant is trailing over a hard surface rather than lack of water at the root; hard surfacing not only gets hot,but holds the heat, and a pale surface will reflect sunlight and heat too. It sounds like you are watering enough, its just the hard surfaces causing the problem. Rigging up some sort of shade for the ...


1

Wilting can be caused by either too little or too much water. In this case though, your Big Max plant seems to be distressed mostly from the midday heat, judging from the wilting cycle and its unresponsiveness to watering. The stone surface it is climbing over will get very hot in the midday sun and exacerbate the wilting. I've seen the same wilting of my ...


1

My thought is that it is already September. You are in Denver CO, and because of the altitude you plants behave as if it were farther north than you really are. Plus, this year the summer cooled down a bit sooner so you don’t have as much heat to drive vigorous vegetative growth anymore. As you can see, you have fruit that is maturing. I think that indicates ...


1

It's possible there is some magnesium deficiency here. Lots of information online including pictures of plants with magnesium problems. When doing a search make sure to specify "magnesium deficiency plants" otherwise the search engine will think you mean deficiency in diet. There are also recommendations for a quick remedial solution involving a foliar spray ...


1

Squash Vine Borer This is similar to what happens with cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower...they have their own 'borer'...a beetle. Others like this are flies, moths. They lay their eggs at the base, when the eggs hatch, the larvae eat the roots and crown of the plant. One day it just falls over or wilts unexpectedly. There is nothing you can do now. I ...


1

This is a product of the final days of life for your plants, the season is coming to an end and the fruits are ripening, the damp morning air in autumn tends to spread this powdery mildew upon the leaves and gives you the sign to start clearing away the old plants for the winter, as the amount of daylight now become shorter, thinning the plants leaves and ...


1

If you left the fruits in contact with the soil as they matured, it's possible that rot has set in because of contact with damp soil. It's best to insert something under the pumpkin to provide a barrier between it and the ground as they ripen, usually a piece of card or cardboard which you replace frequently, and when you water, water the central part of the ...


1

No. Fertilizing too heavily promotes the wrong kind of growth. I've found that pumpkins grow better on black plastic than on a compost mulch (both growing in the same soil). This may have something to do with my untropical climate, but it shows that the node roots are not absolutely necessary for good growth. The only pumpkin I've grown on a trellis was Jack-...


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