New answers tagged

3

It's likely that shoot is coming off the rootstock; apple trees are grafted onto different root stocks, usually to restrict their size. Hopefully, you planted the tree at the same depth it was in its pot originally, and not lower - if you apply a mulch, it's best to leave an inch or so clear round the main stem or trunk so that the mulch is not touching it. ...


2

You can do some pruning now, its not quite too late as its early winter. However, heavy pruning all in one go is not advisable - deciduous magnolias can take a long time to recover from pruning, and hard pruning is likely to cause a lot of watershoots. If you want to reduce its size, the best way is to do it over 3 years, reducing the top branches and twigs ...


2

I have a fig ( Anna) that is that broad but not as tall because I prune. I prune so that most fruit can be reached from a 6 ft ladder. I also like early spring , not a problem if the buds are swelling. As noted you will have heavy production as figs bear on new wood. I try to take a third but it is so much work I usually get no more than a quarter of the ...


2

The UK recommended time is early spring not "winter", but I guess in California you don't usually get daytime temperatures below zero and snow and ice on the ground for very long. You can prune as hard as you like, but don't remove more than about 1/4 of the tree in any one year. For a tree that size, take out branches right down to the trunk. If you want ...


1

That looks remarkably like common holly, or Ilex aquifolium, which gets up to 80 feet tall if left unpruned. It is difficult to keep it small once it gets past the first 6 or 7 years because it grows quite rapidly after that time. You don't mention seeing any berries on it either, so this may be a male plant and will never produce any, though rigorous ...


1

It looks like a holly tree to me. They are usually fairly slow growing, but yours looks well established and they can reach 50 feet tall in a hundred years or more. A good pruning technique is try to remove as much growth from the interior as possible (cutting some branches right back to the trunk), rather than trimming off the outside growth all over with ...


1

Late flowering Oleanders like yours are actually best pruned in late winter or early spring; pruning back now if your weather gets cold may encourage new growth which will be damaged by frost. Oleanders which flower earlier usually finish flowering earlier, so can be pruned back in September, but it's too late in the year now to do them, especially if you've ...


Top 50 recent answers are included