11

There are a couple of problems with your description of how you're going to plant this tree. First, no plant should be planted less than a foot (as a minimum) away from a fence or wall, so if you mean the rootball when you say 'sit tightly' next to a fence, as the topgrowth continues to expand, it will all lean forwards to get away from the fence behind it ...


6

I would choose a climbing plant. Many of them can be pruned, to that you create some holes. I think it is better to have strong sun on few places (sun moves), then translucent leaves. Maybe some rose (if you take wild types, you get edible fruits, and they are usually strong and climbing). On plus side: they make also a physical barrier (with spikes), but ...


4

It's always best to plant any vigorous vines like Distictus in the ground - putting them in pots or containers will restrict their growth, and that's not an effect you want in these circumstances. Distictus buccinatoria reaches up to 4.5 metres, and will cling by itself to brick or stone; on wood, it might or might not cling, or it might need support. ...


4

Leyland Cypress is a popular privacy tree on the west coast, and will also grow well on the east coast from what I have heard. It can be planted as a dense hedge, and provides year round color. They are very hardy, and with fertilizer/good soil can grow 3 feet a year. They will get quite tall if you don't keep them under control, but they accept pruning well,...


4

Highbush blueberries or highbush cranberries both come to mind, and also make fruit you can use in various ways. If you're up to the initial work and long-term maintenance pruning, espaliered or cordoned peaches, plums, apricots, cherries or dwarf apples. Place some scaffold wires for those. Rosa Rugosa will provide a nice harvest of hips and can grow to ...


4

Timing is, IME, important. I got 3 bamboo (A Phyllostachys that I vary between thinking is one of 3 or 4 specific cultivars) that were rudely chopped off and dug up in the middle of the summer (the house it came from was being sold...) One survived, barely, and has since gone on to be a moderately decent stand given that it's not fully hardy here and all top ...


4

The rhizomes and plants above the ground all support one another. If you can dig out a section of 5-10 rhizomes as a clump, they'll have a better chance of surviving. If you are very careful, you can also dog away the dirt around the leading edge of the bamboo. Leading edge means where the new growth is moving to. You can carefully remove the youngest ...


4

There are two issues here the container and the plant: You can try Phyllostachys bissetii which is a runner type that is hardy to around -20 degrees celsius. It is shallow rooted and suitable for containers. The main problem I see is that this plant wants to be 16' tall (~3.5 metres). Unless you have an unusual balcony the plant is likely to be thin at the ...


3

I would advise you not to plant the tree at all for now. Just repot it in a larger container, and place it on a 1m high stand. Next year, use 60cm stand, and even larger container. The following year, use just a couple of bricks as the stand. And the following year, plant the plant. That way, you will always have 3m screen. Also, this will be much smaller ...


3

Either build a support structure, or let it do it's thing. Do NOT build a temporary support for it. The main stalks can grow to 3" or greater in diameter when supported from the ground, and you'll want it self-trained to cling if that's the eventual goal. Otherwise, it will end up leveraging on the fence-top trellis. Hellvine (which is what Trumpet Creeper ...


3

Well, Ecnerwal's suggestion is GORGEOUS and very very needy of a full time gardener. But this should show you there are many ideas for a 3' space to make privacy. 25' at 3' width gives you quite a bit of room. I would definitely be thinking of at least 2 or 3 different species at different height that love the same type of soil. Amelanchier is one of ...


3

I'd recommend Amelanchier lamarckii, and I chose that variety because it reliably produces good autumn colours, usually bright red, before the leaves fall. Has blossom in spring, green leaves all summer, fruits (inedible) followed by fall colours, and the multi stemmed nature of these shrubby trees is attractive in winter, with a reasonably interesting bark. ...


3

You've confirmed the leaves are paired, so I'm pretty sure its a Ligustrum - seeing the flower sprays when they're fully out would help, but probably L. ovalifolium (though the leaves seem a little large for that) or possibly wax Ligustrum, but the leaves just don't seem, in the picture, to be thick and shiny enough for that variety. But it would appear to ...


2

Double row planting allows you to space a bit wider. I would space 3' and the row behind is offset so that the arborvitae of the second row are in the middle of that 3' space. The second row should be 3' from the first row. You will have equilateral triangles with every 3 arborvitae. Each arborvitae will be 3' away from its neighbors, side and back and ...


2

Have you considered some of the varieties of privet? This is used extensively in the Northeast US as a hedge along property lines, especially Ligustrum ovalifolium, and grows up to 15 ft. high. It is often sheared to achieve flat or rounded sides and tops.


2

I'm just a little south of you in the Seattle WA area, and there are tons of options when it comes to bamboo that will thrive around here. For planter use, I'd recommend a small clumping variety, like Rufa. It will be plenty hardy, can tolerate shade, and grows 7-10ft. You'll need to keep the watering up, at least until it is well established. It would be ...


2

Absolutely! Don't put them in the same line if you can possibly do this...make another row, offset from the first at a minimum of 2 feet, 3 feet would be better. You should have equilateral triangles between 2 in the back and one in the front row, the new row. Making a row offset in front of your original row will give reason to the height difference as ...


2

Hmmm... so since these bare trunked trees are deciduous conifers they are likely bald-cypress. This tree can go to over 100 feet tall when given room, but close planted here they will continue to do exactly what you don't want, lose lower branches. These trees were clearly the wrong species to plant in that location; perhaps they were a low cost alternative ...


1

@Kevinsky provided a link in their answer to a similar question that you may find helpful - the specific link is from the Morton Arboretum and discusses seasonal needle drop. It also says that, in times of drought, evergreens will lose needles or, in the case or arbs, branchlets., which is what your arbs are doing. I think your issue may be with watering, ...


1

Let's take an example of a climber/rambler rose growing on a fence 8 feet high and 10 feet wide. To preserve the rose as much as possible the idea is to build a temporary structure to support the rose, put in the cross supports so that the rose is independent of the fence, then cut out the fence, in small pieces if necessary. With the old fence pieces gone ...


1

It would be better to remove all the Thuja, then dig the area over, incorporating humus rich material such as composted manure, good garden compost, leaf mould and the like, then allow the soil to settle for a week or so before new planting goes in. I would also just point out that, if you want a privacy screen, it's probably best to put up a hard privacy ...


1

The trouble is, because of the position of the shed, any bamboo you plant either side of the shed door isn't going to screen that balcony efficiently; if you could relocate the shed to the left hand side, a small tree such as Malus 'Gorgeous' judiciously placed 1 or 2 metres from the right hand fence so that the crown will exclude the view from that balcony ...


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