16

An artificial soil mix offers advantages to growers and some advantages to the people who buy the plants. For the grower: consistent artificial soil quality and mix across multiple batches free of pathogens and the crowd of bacteria/virus/fungi that live in soil different mixes are designed for seedlings, acid loving plants or plants that benefit from ...


10

The conditions for growing mold are warmth, soil consistently wet, little air movement and undisturbed soil, and the presence of spores to feed on the organic matter present. It is natural to find some spores in potting compost, not a big deal. The plant in the pot (probably Chlorophytum) has fleshy roots and can be allowed to dry down between waterings. So ...


8

In response to those up-thread who seem to think that peat extraction in Canada is not a big deal, I have to say: I have stood on the edge of Provincial Area of Natural and Scientific Interest (ANSI) in southern Ontario and watched the peat being extracted. It broke my heart. The bog in question lay just outside the border of a Provincial Park, and the ...


8

Yes, I have had quite a bit of success using 25 litre buckets on my balcony, planting some plants "upside down" and others at the top of the bucket. I cut a small hole in the bottom of the bucket and gently push the roots of my seedling through the hole. I keep the roots in place with a small square of landscaping fabric with a slit cut into one side, or ...


7

Crop rotation My grandparents had а large garden beside the vineyard, that they cared about long years. Every spring, they reshaped the garden - putting the tomatoes, cucumbers, pumpkins, carrots, onion, cabbage and other goodies in new places. They told me this is because every plant uses some same assortiment of nutrients in the soil. Planting the same ...


7

I'm not entirely certain what you're asking - the use of the term 'soil' is confusing. What you buy at the garden centre will be either potting compost (John Innes, Multi purpose, but still potting) or soil conditioning compost, or composted animal manure, or topsoil. Topsoil is only as good as where its been extracted from - its dug out of the ground and ...


7

Just for interest's sake, I'll add something, though Kevinsky has given a comprehensive answer already. The reason you don't just dig up a bit of soil from your garden, put it in a pot and then plant something in it is simple - any pathogens present are now contained in that pot and multiplying, rather than being diluted in open ground, which means there's a ...


7

Well I wouldn't worry about drying it out first - simply tip it out of its pot, preferably wearing gloves, carefully, and with any luck, most of the wet soil will fall off immediately anyway. The plant appears to be quite small for the size pot its in, so its unlikely to be full of roots. They're quite forgiving of being potted on, but have a pot and your ...


7

In theory, when you perform a transplant you should avoid damaging any of the roots at all, since any damage to roots causes the plant stress during transplant. In practice, you will always damage some small number of roots no matter how careful you are, unless you transplant a gigantic sized root-ball. So my answer to your question is you should move a root ...


7

The trouble with introducing 'life' by inoculating with garden soil is you have no control over which life forms you are introducing, and some of them might be pathogenic when contained inside a pot or grow bag. That is why there are commercially produced potting composts, to avoid that risk. Some people actually grow plants in soil they've dug from the ...


7

Potting soil also gets compressed over time. The most important thing about potting soil is that it shouln't contain fungus spores, insect eggs and weeds. I say "it shouldn't" because I have bought potting soil with earthworms and some germinated seeds, probably weeds, but not sure since I have removed them immediatly. Also, potting soil has a label that ...


6

Of course you can compost it! Clay soil improvement (@uncle brad) is another possibility. I use it to fill small lawn gaps (I'm not into the bowling green quality lawns!) or to help top up raised beds (where the bulk goes). The only thing to watch for would be possible disease. You may want to discard it if you had some serious disease (or nematode) ...


6

I agree with Bamboo. I think a cursory search on google.com with the name of the plant and "soil requirements" will turn up the best solution. While a large majority of plants you'll buy at a non-specialty store or nursery are just fine in a common potting soil, there are several that aren't and a few reasons why. One big reason, right off the bat, is that ...


6

It will definitely make a difference if you add enough, but probably not a useful one. Ash is high in potash (compounds of potassium) and usually also high in calcium salts. This invariably raises the pH of soil. Ash unfortunately does not contain nitrogen, which is a more important plant nutrient than potassium. Given that potassium is the third major ...


6

No, it's not too late to 'unplant' it, it won't yet have started to put out roots from the pot shaped rootball. The best way when planting a tree is to prepare the ground beforehand by digging it over in as wide an area as possible and adding humus rich material (garden compost, composted animal manure, whatever you can get hold of), then letting it settle ...


6

If this is topsoil, not a bagged potting mix, it will contain lots of soil microbes. These can sour the soil if it is stored damp. I've used 14 yr. old bagged soil before, and most of it was fine. I did a smell test. Some of the bags were still damp inside (completely sealed), and a couple of them smelled sour. The others, including what dried, smelled ...


6

I'm not sure about the specific species, but they appear to be worms from the family Enchytraeidae (commonly known as potworms). They are not earthworms, but similar. They feed on/live in decayed organic matter, and do not harm plants. They need moisture to thrive, and prefer a low pH. When the conditions are right, they tend to multiply rapidly. They are ...


6

The trouble with gardening is, ask a panel of experts a question and you'll get 3 different answers. I remember your original question on this plant and then, you believed you should wait for the peat soil it was in to dry out before attempting to repot in different soil. That wasn't true, and I don't think this latest thing is any more true either - when I ...


6

If you used the spikes, I'd be surprised if you could smell those to the extent of your apartment 'reeking', but its simple to remove them. I suspect, though, you probably used the bagged granular formulation, and that would cause a stink, and there's not much you can do about it except to wait for it to pass, which it will, eventually. Either that or repot ...


6

Just add water. Leave it in the bag and poke a hose right into the plastic and fill. Poke into another spot and fill. Leave it to absorb the moisture. Soil and other rooting media if allowed to get too dry becomes hydrophobic; the soil will shed water as if the soil were covered in oil. Potting soil is sterilized. That is the beauty of potting soil. ...


5

Is the plant healthy and growing? If so then leave it alone. You can top dress with a soil less mix or just add some on top. If you are potting it to a larger size then put some new soil in the bottom of the pot. Although tropical plant growers use soil less mix because it is consistent and weed free a clay or loam based mix will do just fine and may have ...


5

I have had a great deal of success growing vegetables in a 5 gallon bucket. I live in FL and we are about to enter the "off season" for vegetable gardening as choices are somewhat limited because of our warm evenings. Many veggies need a cooler part of the day to do their best. But things I am harvesting now include many types of peppers, eggplant and ...


5

Quick and Dirty Self-Watering 5-Gallon Bucket Garden __ Parts List 1 Kiddie Pool example 7 Clean 5-Gallon Buckets example (or however many will fit comfortably in the Kiddie pool you just bought) 7 Clean (Read: Bleached) Bath Towels Asbestos free vermiculite. example - info Your favorite potting soil Instructions Drill/Cut 4 Holes on 4 Sides, 2 ...


5

It's probably not the end of the world. Put plenty of light on your plant (and its soil) and the light should inhibit the mold if it's pathogenic. When the plant is established it shouldn't be a big risk, unless it hardly gets any light, but I've never grown Peace Lillies. I don't think mold in and of itself is usually a big problem, but moldy soil may also ...


5

I'm presented with what looks like two completely opposite issues - the flower has suffered balling, and that is usually caused by damp cool conditions, in particular, rain, but the leaves appear to be suffering from drought/heat. I suppose there might be an explanation - perhaps, when you watered these in to their new pots (and I hope you did) you watered ...


5

Bamboo is right that generally you do need roots to replant an aloe vera pup, but anecdotally I know people who say they've been successful replanting a rootless pup. You've already got the pup and the soil, so I'd keep going with it. The coir is fine as a planting medium, but I disagree with the advice to dry it out. For the plant to root, it will need to ...


5

So there are two possibilities here, one is that you are indeed seeing mold, the other is you are seeing salts and mineral deposits on the surface of your soil. Mold is minimized by watering only when needed, but you should water deeply to prevent salts from developing on your surfaces. Salts develop when you have hard water (including softened water). If ...


5

Generally, ordinary soil is not sterilized commercially because its not necessary. Bagged or loose topsoil can be purchased, but it is not intended for use in pots, so there's no need for it to be sterile. Sterilized potting composts are available for sale, usually produced using an aerobic hot composting method because most contain humus rich materials. ...


5

"Normal soil" is so variable that it's a fairly meaningless term unless you qualify it. I used to live in a part of the UK where the topsoil was about 30% sand and 70% fine silt, with the water table two feet below the surface all the year round. If you cut off literally any part of a plant and just stuck it in the ground, it would grow. The local joke was ...


4

Growing apples from seed does not usually meet people's expectations. They are not likely to be successfully grown indoors over several years and are very unlikely to bear any fruit. light requirements are high and it's difficult to match them without high pressure sodium or other high intensity lights. seedlings take longer to get to fruit bearing age (...


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