Hot answers tagged

9

I can attest from personal experience that if you build it, they will come. Just not necessarily who you might expect... Practically speaking the smaller the pond the more maintenance you have to do. Some of the factors that are in play: small ponds heat up and cool down faster due a smaller volume of water small ponds tend to go "green" with algae faster ...


9

Frogs are great natural garden predators of insects and it doesn't take much to attract them to your yard. They like: shallow water that is not moving a lot cover in the water from plants like water lilies or even clumps of algae easy access and exit from the water. Steep sides are more work no fish: fish eat frog eggs You should review what insects also ...


7

You only need to be worried about some pathogenic e coli that can be incorporated into plant tissues. And generally these are not found in aquatic environments. The other bacteria, viruses and amoebae can be washed off. In all cases, all are destroyed in cooking. People use fish ( unsure about turtles ) in aquaponics systems where the waste water is ...


7

That's a relatively small pond. If you had the patience, you could empty most of it onto your lawn with a 5 gallon bucket, then pull up the liner and let the rest drain into the soil. Personally, I would not use the rocks to fill it. I have a lawn that's so full of rocks it's impossible to dig anywhere. I would fill the bottom 6-8" with whatever cheap fill ...


6

Any molluscide you use is likely to kill fish as well, but even if you found one that killed the snails and the fish didn't die, the water will become toxic because of the presence of so many dead bodies. The usual means of preventing such an infestation is to quarantine plants before placing in your pond, to check for any kind of pest such as this, or '...


6

I've just read on one wildlife site that the smallest pond that will be attractive and the most successful to amphibians to lay their spawn will be 6 feet by 6 feet. They may sometimes place their spawn in small water features if that's all there is, but the spawn doesn't usually mature successfully because its too exposed and gets eaten. Even frogs don't ...


5

Yes, mortar and concrete will affect water quality for the first little while. How long depends on the pH of your local water and how diligent you are at reducing the reactivity of the mortar by using acidic agents like vinegar. If the pH of the water tends to become extremely alkaline you can counteract this with muriatic acid. However there are other ...


5

I'm not sure you can have everything you want with this project. While this is not a complete answer you may find some of these points to be relevant: turtles eat fish, frogs and just about anything they can ambush. Not a good mix with many other animals. if you want a still pond you will have an ideal environment for mosquitoes. If you think a few more ...


4

Yes that should be possible. But read up on the details below. How to grow Sarracenia. From the Carnivorous Plant FAQ. Good link. The whole FAQ is also helpful. Above says "zero-nutrient, acid medium". So I assume that means zero nitrates? If you have algae in your pond then you probably have too many nitrates they are feeding on.


4

I have seen these plants growing wild in USDA zone 4. It should be possible to duplicate the conditions: full sun constant access to water but not in the water sited at the edge of a hummock of grasses over compacted dead plant material I would use dried sphagnum moss if you can find it at florists or craft stores. Failing that shredded coconut husk or ...


4

You could get a long way towards clean by simply running a bubbler (air) into the bottom of the pond - that will drive the bacteria population from anaerobic (stinky) to aerobic (nicer smelling) and burn off some of the excess nutrient. If nothing else, it will make further emptying and cleaning far more pleasant to deal with, and should be useful in the ...


4

Empty it and clean it out. But don't use a shovel, because you could tear the lining if it's still good. The stink is from organic material rotting on the bottom. Buy a good book on DIY water features.


4

I think the first thing to do is test the water , pH is easy. If it is between 6.5 and 7.5 , try phase two. Get a plastic tub ( or anything) with a few gallon capacity and fill it with collected water. Get a cheap goldfish and put it in and see if it lives. If it lives you need to decide how much pond you want; dig it yourself?, rubber liner ?, concrete ?, ...


3

That depends on if you eat vegetables raw, and how paranoid you are. Properly cooked veg should not be a problem. If you are paranoid, just don't put pond water on root vegetables, or cook them well. Turtles can also carry salmonella.


3

I am currently trying to germinate bladderwort from seed. I prepared a very moist soil less mix in a plastic transparent egg carton and put them under indoor lights. Six weeks later progress is slow. The seedlings are one to two millimeters high. I believe the real difficulty will getting them large enough to out grow the algae that will start growing ...


3

This must be Purple Pickerelweed, Pontaderia cordata. I've made lots of water 'ponds' but I would invest in great water lilies. I would probably try growing this guy but there is just so much room even in the largest pots. Water lilies shade the water so that the fish I've added don't boil. Source


3

You should at least spring for a water test. My guess is that the water is hypoxic, perhaps due to eutrophication from fertilizer runoff. If so, then a bubbler system could help (perhaps donated for credit), along with trying to limit the fertilizer runoff.


3

Duckweed is just annoying if you have fish because then it reduces your surface visibility so that you can't see them. But otherwise there's no down sides. If you use a net to remove the duck weed and put it in the compost, or feed the chickens, you may find that the increased light levels might stimulate algae growth if there's a lot of nitrates etc in ...


3

Congratulations on your new neighbours. I have frogs in my pond for some of the year. They have no problems with duckweed or plants. They do like: areas of water that do not move, perfect for duckweed! shallow areas where they can sit and pretend to be invisible lots of bugs Frogs and fish do not go well together. Fish will eat frog eggs. Pesticides, ...


3

You can have most of what you want but it will cost you in space. I would look into natural pools The water will be filtered by the plants taking up the nutrients. They are also somewhat low maintenance depending on what plants you and fish you put in. I disagree with kevinsky that turtles will eat fish. It will depend on what type of turtle you get. Birds ...


3

You may be overthinking this.Try punching holes in the liner with something like a machete , knife, sharpened rebar, etc. The water should leak out in a couple days at most.That will also give the frogs, toads, turtles, whatever, time to leave. I have the opposite problem, a somewhat larger pond that has a leak I can't find , so I trickle a hose into it ...


3

I have some water features with trees nearby and leaves are a pain. I just fish them out hand where they hang out at the edge or use a net. It's not a good idea to ignore them as they will sink and eventually create a layer of muck on the bottom of your pond.


3

I think I would regrade the land as you're intending, but I would not create a pond. To do that correctly you're looking at creating the pond's area and depth, lining it (typically with clay and/or sand), laying pond felt, laying a liner, securing the liner, bringing and placing cobbles of various sizes, and installing plants. You then have maintenance, as ...


2

I cannot answer all of your question but have these observations from my own experiences keeping koi: the bigger the pond the better. Sheer quantity of water provides a buffer for temperature changes and water quality changes koi are very happy to eat anything they can get in their mouths. That prized water lily, that rare native water plant: a mere snack ...


2

Willows will grow in any combination of wet and soil. They might grow slower when grown in water without soil but most species will get too large for a small pond/ditch. With my pond I use a plastic planting basket or a pot with holes in the side and put the cutting or stem in this with some substrate to hold it up. Pea stone or coconut coir provide ...


2

I can't tell you exactly, but they don't last as long as you'd want them to. We use eastern read cedar as horse fence posts through the woods, occasionally. I've had them go down in as little as 8 years. Others last longer. Having recently had to repair a dock, it's worth it, due the large amount of physical effort it will require to install the posts, to ...


2

I've moved this summary up from the bottom - this is where you arrive at after this longish answer: The short summary is that you will be able to find pumps that provide both the flow rate and head that you want for almost any filter BUT, you will reduce your pump costs by using a large, low pressure drop filter. Filter costs should be low compared to pump ...


2

You will probably find that you cannot GET 4000l/hr through a smaller filter. Less area with more flow = higher pressure drop. Higher pressure drop moves your pump to somewhere else on its pump curve. If the filter is on the suction side, you may also get cavitation and move your pump off this mortal coil...(ie, self-destruct it.) You could run the falls ...


2

With a black pond liner , you will not see the debris. For about 20 years I have had a small pond with a 30 ft. long small, recycle stream. I am in a forest. Once a year I would get in and clean the bottom, The last few years I could not because of a health problem. The only change I see is that the water lillies bloomed better this year although they have ...


2

Might want to check with a friendly health inspection department. They have techniques for handling complaints about water possibly discharged from septic beds into neighbouring lands. Frequently this involves addition of a dye to water flushed through a toilet bowl and then watching to see if the dye appears at the discharge in question. One case I was ...


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