9

I'm in the UK, and we don't have poison ivy, oak nor sumach, so I've never actually seen them. However, the small leaved plant covering the ground in between the Hosta leaves and the one with palmate leaves appears to be Vinca minor, common name lesser periwinkle, usually has blue flowers in spring. The palmate leaved plant looks like Parthenocissus, or ...


6

Tear off what's there in order to trace it back to its origination, pulling the vines up & out off of the surface & out of the grass. Removing what you can now is safest. Without leaves & actively pumping oil you'll be much more able to contain any oil to your gloves. After that yes, wait for any remnants to sprout & produce leaves before ...


6

Oh yes. Top two pics are raspberries. Bottom one I'm not sure. But #3 and #4, the thing trying to climb a tree, sets off all my warning signs. Notice they are glossy and a little red. And you can see why it's called ivy, right? This is the only thing we use Roundup on. In fact in Ontario that's the only reason you can buy it. DO NOT BURN POISON IVY! Even ...


5

You can't find anything about toxicity of Hedera (Ivy) in the environment because it isn't toxic, unless you eat it. This is true of over 50% of plants commonly grown in gardens in the northern hemisphere, which is why it's important to instruct children in regard to consuming any leaves and particularly berries they may find growing. One issue that some ...


5

I'd say yes, it has all the markers we have available at this time of year. Terminal leaflet larger than the other two, terminal leaflet has stalk, the others not. Leaflets pointed, edges bumpy and sometimes indented. Looks very close, you can wait for flowers and fruit which would provide further confirmation if that is possible or of interest. But note ...


5

As @kevinsky said, follow the directions. As far as how long the poison ivy will remain an irritant, this excerpt from Wikipedia about it should give you an idea: Urushiol oil can remain active for several years, so handling dead leaves or vines can cause a reaction. In addition, oil transferred from the plant to other objects (such as pet fur) can cause ...


4

Glyphosate pesticides (most notably, Roundup) are supoosed to be sprayed on the leaves; plants translocate the glyphosate into the root. However, I've found that poison ivy is realtively difficult to control with glyphosate pesticide. But, glyphosate is still the go-to solution as far as over-the-counter herbicides are concerned. Generally speaking, the ...


3

I own property with a lot of poison ivy, I first discovered it by triming brush and found myself standing in a field of it. I have been using tecnu for many years and have not gotten the poison ivy rash. I take a bath with it. The hard part is washing it off with cool water. Tecnu is also good for fire ant bites. I buy my tecnu from Gemplers in the 32 oz ...


3

That absolutely is not sumac or poison ivy. It's got a dogwood looking leaf on it. Look above this plant and see what type tree is growing over it. It's possibly some type tree seedling.


3

I believe this is a grape ivy or Cissus rhombifolia https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/grape-ivy/grape-ivy-houseplant.htm


3

Looks like blackberry, invasive in zone 8 and probably many other zones. I find the fruit to be flavorless but many people love it, birds also love the fruit.


3

David, the best way I've found to kill well established areas of very tough weeds (black berry, chinese knotweed...etc.) was to smother them. For my blackberries, I had the tree company working for the electric company pruning trees messing up the electrical lines dump their chips on my acre of blackberry. Piles 4-6' tall. All winter these piles produced ...


3

Well I think the instructions answer your question: the plant is not actively growing you would be fortunate to get temperatures above 60 deg F at this time of year You should spray in spring when the active agent will be more effective.


3

I think this is more of a legal question, which depends where you live. I have the understanding that if something hangs into your yard, you have the right to do with it as you wish (cut it off, leave it). What neighbors are growing and how it affects you is probably for a judge to decide. A good solution may be to take a peace offering to your neighbors (...


2

They look to me like a member of the Cissus Genus, Vitacea (Grape) Family, probably something along the lines of Cissus trifoliata. This and this flickr images look very similar to me. The Dave's Garden page here also has more info and pictures that look about right. FWIW, ivies have more of a point on the tip of their foils but yours look to almost be ...


1

These look rather like Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) - early leaves are highly variable and there is a tell-tale redness extending into the leaf main vein. If it is roselle you should see the leaf shape change quite a bit as the plant grows with deep clefts between leaf lobes. I'd say it was worth hanging on to these seedlings until they reveal themselves ...


1

I have found this on the HGTV channel https://www.hgtv.com/outdoors/flowers-and-plants/how-to-kill-poison-ivy It needs several tries to be effective, and it is advised to pour it over the center, so that you kill the main roots holding the trunk, not just peripheral roots which can re-sprout. They are deciduous, so I guess pulling them before spring leaves ...


1

This looks like poison ivy. Good for you to catch this! I would use good old glyphosate, Round up. Don't spray it, use rubber gloves and with whetted finger tips apply to a few of the leaves. I would of course cut those plants back allowing a good 2 feet of vine and healthy leaves to treat. Get those thick black rubber gloves made for chemicals. That ...


1

Look around at the desirable plants nearby, and read the label on 2,4-D to see if that will have undesirable effects on any of them. Grasses and some woody plants are immune to 2,4-D if it's used in lawful quantities (you must obey the instructions on the label). Poison ivy, however, is killed good-and-plenty by it. You'll still need to leave the area ...


1

Were you digging ? I got a bad case of poison oak while planting things in fill soil containing poison oak roots, no leaves. Photo leaves don't look much like ivy either ( osmanthus seedlings ?). Ivy does not have the little needles along the margins. In E TX where ivy is very common , the look-alike that stops me occasionally is Virginia Creeper. Could you ...


1

That looks like an epimedium (perhaps Epimedium rubrum), not poison ivy. PI typically has bat-wing style leaves, although it can be very variable. All leaflets tend to be the same size, or close to it, unlike what you've pictured. The color is also somewhat off for spring foliage (it should eb a brighter red).ut then again, it's variable.


1

First a word of caution - if you are sensitive to poison ivy, or even unsure, then leave well alone. It's not worth it for a few raspberries. Poison ivy and raspberries are strongly surface rooted plants and exposure to the sap in cut ivy roots will trigger sensitivity. Roots spread widely and may be present even where there appears to be no top growth. So ...


1

I believe (almost sure) this is an Acer griseum. If this turns out to be true, you have one of the most appreciated ornamental trees of all times. https://www.google.rs/search?q=Acer+griseum+leaves&client=ms-android-doogee&tbm=isch&prmd=ivmn&source=lnms&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjo85iR6_DYAhXE3iwKHaxcCi4Q_AUICSgB&biw=360&bih=560&...


1

I would try spraying the area with soapy water, preferably a biodegradable type. I would use doctor bronners sal suds soap. Spray it, scrub it with a brush or something and then wash the grass off with plain water so it goes into the soil. This probably won't be 100% effective, but good news! Grass grows and within a few weeks and a few mows, the area ...


1

First, what kind of a mower? Push or gas or electric. Were you bagging the clippings? Any tiny piece of poison ivy will have Urushiol which causes the allergic reactions. I'd take a good blower and blow that lawn well, pushing the tidbits into your plant beds. Sounds as if you will have to always be alert for poison ivy anyway. Little rubber boots, ...


1

The bottom picture is also poison ivy. Use Roundup on the low plants, but if you have any tree-high stuff, put on long sleeves/pants, and wear gloves and goggles, and carefully cut it off at ground level. Do not touch the plant with your gloves. When it flushes out, use Roundup. I recently had to do this at a clients house, and the main stem was 7 1/2 " in ...


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