4

Your Green Giant can attain a width of at least 12 feet, so you'll never notice the crooked base after a few years - assuming that the area at the base of the plant is relatively weed free so that the branches aren't shaded by competition. Even if you limb it up at some point, the crookedness will impart some architectural interest to the trunk. I would ...


3

It's not really a good idea - the cactus needs fast draining soil mix, and water is very much reduced or even suspended in winter during dormancy. They also need a position with some evening or morning sunlight. The Dracaena marginata needs watering year round, and just needs ordinary potting soil, as well as medium or bright light conditions, but without ...


3

Removal of some or most soil from about the roots may be quite helpful for small trees in containers, and perhaps for small transplant trees with roots wrapped in burlap etc, but for larger trees becomes more problematical the larger the tree: eg, tree transplanting equipment, which lifts the tree & roots & soil: when planting, something is required ...


3

No need to worry. That’s a tuberous begonia - and it’s just too small to flower yet. Unlike the spring bulbs you may be more familiar with, these begonias have tubers that can go dormant (what you bought) and regrow again in spring and will flower when they are grown into good-sized plants. Take good care of it and expect flowers in a few weeks.


3

Celosia are half hardy annuals in the UK; they can be planted outdoors as part of a summer bedding scheme, but they are frost sensitive and need hardening off prior to planting out; they need a warm and sheltered spot. They can also be kept as temporary, short lived houseplants; indoors in coolish temperatures (around 15-20 degC) they will flower for a ...


3

Now that I understand your set-up is not abrasive I edited my original answer. Yes, the direction you have your hose wrapped hold moisture right against the tree with not chance to dry. You can use a hose as you did before, just set it up as in the pictures below. Make sure you leave it loose enough that the tree is able to sway some in the wind. Those ...


3

I would not plant these until spring. When I worked in a southern Zone 4 nursery, we wouldn't even sell arbor vitae after September 30 unless pushed to do so by the customer - and then we wouldn't warrantee them (which is what we would normally do). I currently live in zone 5, and still wouldn't plant them this late. In my experience, arbs don't root-in ...


2

In some cases the seller might select a cultivar that is very prolific at producing many seeds on a shorter cycle (quick to bolt) for spout seed production (as the cash crop), while this is often an undesirable trait for seed you would want to achieve a large, mature, but not yet going to seed, food crop plant. A sprout seller can also get away with ...


2

If they are two completely separate plants (not two stems growing from one bunch of roots) I would plant them separately. They may look a bit "sparse" this year, but next year you should have several canes (British for "stocks" I assume) from each plant. FWIW in the UK you would normally plant the canes when they were dormant (November to March) - but ...


2

Ivy is almost impossible to remove. There are a few ways to deal with Ivy . . . The easiest way for you, since you have already dug out and removed a lot of Ivy roots, is to just keep careful watch for any Ivy foliage that has started to grow back in the area you don't want it in and remove it. Other plants can grow around the Ivy roots if the growth of the ...


2

You should prune the suckers; the new branches that are growing out from each node/leafed branch. Those suckers will grow horizontally if you don't pinch them off. Some people like to let the sucker branches grow for MORE fruit, but the fruit will be SMALLER. Personally, I prune all suckers until my single vine tomato plants reach the top of a trellis, ...


2

I think the answer is probably yes. Your red line seems to be at the place where the graft was made. Add soil/compost up to the level of the graft. It would benefit the tree to have a mulch of 2"/3" on top of this but be sure to keep the mulch away from the bark of the tree. The mulch will help keep the roots cool in summer, suppress weeds and ...


2

In my experience, this takes about a season or two to be fully effective (I am also in a zone 8). Less than that and the grass seems to grow back. Since you are planning on turning this into a garden, I would recommend covering the cardboard with compost (or perhaps partially composted material). This will have the benefit of helping the cardboard compost ...


2

Basic tools can be used at the cost of a lot of sweat. First tip is to water the area to be planted thoroughly the day before or even for a day or two. Wet soil is heavier but breaks up easier. Use a pick axe to dig a hole. You might be able to switch to a post hole digger once you have penetrated the crust If you have access to power tools that you can ...


2

The only trees I will ever support with stakes and ties are; bare root trees, mature trees that were moved to another location and trees that were blown over. When one supports a tree it becomes just like your arm or leg that was broken and was put into a cast. Atrophy. Trees especially, NEED to move in the wind. That is what creates a supportive root ...


2

Container-grown plants can usually be planted at any time except when the ground is frozen. Air temperatures below freezing don't matter, so long as the plants were previously being grown in the same conditions. A reputable supplier should only ship bare-root plants when they are fully dormant, and the general weather conditions mean the ground is not frozen....


2

I've had garlic sprout in the fall myself when the weather turns quite warm after a cold spell (in November in my area). This is normal but not-helpful behavior for garlic in the North (I'm assuming that you garden in a colder climate because you haven't indicated a location in your profile). So, what to do about the sprouted garlic? It's okay if the foliage ...


2

None of them? Usually the best way it is to buy from a nursery. You may have your own nursery and own orchard, but the first is usually more complex (and it may have more regulation), so it is not the good way to start. But if you go in this direction, you can plant the tree much denser (possibly where it is also easier to water, and to fertilize, and with ...


1

Another suggestion that has worked very well for me over the last ten years is to mount the stag horn on top of a hat stand. I carefully separated my plant into two pieces and bound the two pieces either side of the top of he hat stand using hessian strapping. I used sphagnum moss and shredded coconut infill. This provides the plant with plenty of room to ...


1

As it grows, it will need space to hang down below the level where it is planted. You could buy something like a cat tree, and use it as a stand for some other plants as well as the fern. Or if you want something a bit more "up market", get a Victorian plant stand (or a modern replica) which is basically a pillar with a top just big enough to hold ...


1

Black plastic sheet/film , is much more effective. Cardboard blocks light ,plants yellow and die in a month or more. Black plastic cooks them quickly ,if you have sun. It is also supposed to sterilize the soil, more or less. I have accidentally killed lawn in 2 days,although in that short time the roots can come back .


1

It sounds like it is landscape fabric - this is usually used primarily for weed suppression. It's laid on top of soil which has hopefully been dug over previously, then holes are cut into it, usually by making a cross, then folding back the flaps and planting into the gap. The fabric will be cut around any pre-existing planting, and then a mulch of some ...


1

Maybe look at beach-rose (Rosa rugosa). I don't know if the light will be ok, but they are very hardy and definitely salt-tolerant. They're also (at least in my opinion) good-looking plants, with thorns (that will discourage the dogs/walkers), and you can make a very nice tea from the rose hips they produce.


1

I prefer cuttings: you see a good plant, you accidentally cut few branches, and you plant them. After one or two year, you remove all but one. Bare-root is always more tricky: hole, watering, etc. So I prefer using "statistics", and so various cuttings, and ignoring most of common rules on planting saplings. Various plants are created with cuttings (but ...


1

Interesting question; the soil may be depleted, so when refilling, maybe consider fresh soil. Before refilling the hole, place a thin vertical solid plastic barrier material around the perimeter of the excavated hole to stop/slow incursion of new roots, that extends down deeper than the bottom of the hole. The hole would have to be deep enough to discourage ...


1

You definitely can plant new items on your terrace garden--but it may take some time. If you're comfortable, you can first spray the area with a chemical herbicide such as glyphosate--but this is optional as I do not typically do this. If a chemical herbicide is not an option for you because you're going to plant something you will eventually eat or your not ...


1

Perfectly normal - when the heads look white, that's the flowers - they turn brown as they start forming seed. They've flowered this year because they're old enough to do so, in their second year. You can certainly cut them off if you don't like the look of them.


1

In their natural life cycle, the potatoes would have been in the ground all winter, and would start growing in spring when the soil temperature is right for them. Unless they have been frozen and killed (which isn't very likely), they will grow just fine when the conditions are right.


1

Unless your containers are very small and the cold was very deep, there is a good chance that the potatoes will be fine. It takes a lot of cold to freeze a container entirely, and even then the potatoes are exothermic - the heat on the inside of the mass of the tuber will protect the surface where the eyes are from freezing. I'd say at least 98% chance that ...


1

If you live outside the city in the suburbs or "the country", then that's deer damage, and there's no real way to prevent it except by fencing. There are some products that do work for a little while, but they need to be reapplied rather frequently and usually stink of either coyote urine or rotten eggs.


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