7

As I recall, you're in the UK - the ground is not yet frozen, so get them in asap, having first dug the whole area over thoroughly, not just digging holes and inserting the trees, especially if you have clay soil. If they're going in separate areas, just ensure you dig over where you want to plant 3 times the width and length you need for actual planting. I ...


7

If you ask yourself what wegetable you should grow at a given time, you should use a seasonality table like this one. This kind of document can help you to chose and optimize your cultures by planning at month scale every phase of your cultivated vegetables. Find a similar document at a local gardening store to be sure it is suitable to your location. To ...


7

Just a quick answer to get started, based on my experience. I never lived in the Puget Sound area, but know it quite well. Will continue to fill in as I have time. Short answer: Get started now, this is the perfect time. On a quick glance I see no plant that you would be too late for, but I haven't sown/planted all of them myself. Calendula will be fine. ...


7

It's possible they may do nothing at all ever, but you should plant them immediately anyway - they may put out some leaves which will at least enable them to garner food supplies for possible flowering next year and gives them a bit of a chance of surviving. There is nothing to be gained by waiting until this fall, they'll likely shrivel and dry out by then. ...


6

Many of the brassica group will work. Late cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts can be direct seeded in early summer for a fall crop. I sometimes use bush beans, because they mature so fast. Root crops like beets, carrots, and turnips can be started now for fall use/storage. Even earlivee sweet corn will crop in 55 days. There are so many ...


6

No vegetable is going to grow well in that climate, without a lot of water. There are several veggies that can take that climate, though. I've compiled a list: Cucumber - Most varieties like extremely high temperatures, but need moisture. Melon - These came from hot, arid climates, and were adapted for temperate climates. They still prefer hot temps. ...


5

My list is based growing in the ground (not raised beds -- this is my experience). If you're growing in raised beds, you may be able to start a week earlier (they will warm up faster). If you need to build beds, you'll need to have those ready before you can start anything. I can't give exact dates, because individual locations vary widely in what can be ...


5

Do it. Pussywillows are tough. If you can dig the hole, you can plant the tree. Roots will stay active until the ground freezes hard. Be even with your packing. Late fall planting results in non-consolidated soil when it freezes. This is more likely to heave. Now you don't really care that it heaves, but you do want the tree to stay plumb. With a ...


5

There are "calendars" of crops, explaining what to do each month. You have to think that it is impossible to give a detailed analysis of each, because the size of the ground, conformation, climate, soil composition, and the tastes of the farmer are always different. You like strawberries, green beans to me. A clay soil is dry, another is acidic and moist. ...


5

Plant them now, although I doubt you'll get any flowers this year. Don't remove the leaves before they completely fade. You can keep the bulbs in the ground without taking them out every year until they are too crowded - it will take a few years until they divide that much to become crowded. If you don't plant the bulbs, they might shrivel too much and die ...


4

Provided what you're planting isn't tender and will withstand any frosts you might get, then yes, you can plant now, unless the soil is frozen or waterlogged. On the assumption that you get rain in winter, plants won't get baked too much by the sun before they've had time to put out a good root system, meaning they should be more settled in by next summer. ...


4

Quite a bit of stuff actually, even in Scotland, but a lot of it will need to be sown inside or somewhere heated at this time of year up there, it being that much cooler than us here in London. Also, some vegetable crops can be germinated and started into growth now, but will simply sit, protected, in the greenhouse, until spring, when the weather warms up ...


4

I've just checked the weather forecast for your area for the next few days, which does not show any really cold temperatures - if you have not yet had freezing temperatures, and day time temperatures have been around 12-15 deg C, the soil should still be holding some warmth, so now is absolutely the time to plant your willow. Water well after planting, and ...


4

Adequate photoperiod is not enough for carnations (Dianthus caryophyllus) to start flowering. They need a few months of cold environment like I said in your other question, about 5°C (41F°) for 10 weeks. I live in a temperate climate, zone 6b, and my experience with carnations is as follows: They were started by seed in spring 2016, experienced increasing ...


4

I would avoid planting them in frozen soil. An alternative is to keep them in a cool, dry and DARK place until the spring. If you have a dry basement or garage that stays "cold", that might be perfect, especially if outside temps stay well below freezing all winter. (aim for "40/40" - 40 days below 40 degrees before you plant). You'll have beautiful scapes ...


3

Since garlic is recommended to be planted about 6 weeks before freezing, you've already passed the (proper) opportunity to plant them I'm afraid (why would you want to plant them in the frozen soil anyway?). Planting garlic in USDA zones 4 and 5 is fine, but since winter comes sooner in those zones than say in zones 6 or 7 you should've planted them several ...


3

The easiest way to store them is to put them in the ground. However, if for some reason, you can't plant them again, wash them thoroughly, keep them in a well ventilated area for a week or so, and then put them in paper or cloth bags. Write the date on a label in case you forget when you dug them up.


3

If they haven't germinated yet, they may not germinate at all, or more likely, some might do so next spring/early summer. It's usual to sow these indoors a few weeks before the last frost date,then transfer outside later as plants, or to sow seed in spring after the last frost date. Self sown plants usually germinate the following spring. Info here http://...


3

I've done it both ways (also zone 4) and always get better production if it's in the ground over winter (even if gotten in very late in the fall, or even early in the winter). Part of the problem is that it's going to be ready just about the same time, (late July or early August) as it's (IIRC) more based on day-length than age, so it will have less time to ...


3

Because garlic is a root product, by planting it in the fall there is more time for the bulb to grow, you simply get a tastier, bigger bulb. You most certainly can plant in the spring. If you plant in raised beds and add a bit of balanced fertilizer, you should have decent sized bulbs by fall. I never remember to plant garlic in the fall. My bad. ...


3

I don't think it's too late if you buy the plants at a garden center. With the sun out for so long during the summer, plants grow extraordinarily fast (compared to my hometown in California, for instance). Most garden centers now sell larger vegetables, so it won't take long to catch up with people that's grown them from seed. If you plant at a sunny ...


3

You can plant them when it's still frosting out, but not when it's still freezing regularly. Until then, keep them in the coolest, darkest spot you have inside. An unheated basement or garage is perfect. A large shed should work too, if not too drafty. If it's too warm, they will put out shoots and start growing, which isn't fatal, but can cause severe ...


3

I planted healthy crocus bulbs in November one year that was way too late (Zone 4 on a north sloope) and they never grew. I should have waited until spring.


2

I will focus this answer on ground planting (as opposed to sowing in cell pots, or planters) Plant them in the spring after frost has passed, but the ground is still cool. To sow in the ground, work up the top 3-4" of good topsoil and rake it smooth. You want a flat, even seedbed. For a row, create a furrow >1" deep where the row is to be, and place seeds ...


2

USDA Zones indicate minimum annual temperature; the information we really need to help answer your question is when does your last frost typically occur? In Zone 7, your expected low temperatures would be about 5°F (Z8 more like 15°F), but this doesn't help us know when you expect the weather to start warming up -- which is the key consideration here. I ...


2

Are you in the US? If so, there are plenty of sites online that will show you suggested planting dates for different vegetables based on the USDA planting zone you live in or even based on your zip code. That would be the best place to start.


2

I don't know about zone 4, but in my area (zone 6) garlic is planted usually in spring, specifically in March right after the soil dethaws and is ready for harvest in July. When planted in spring, garlic competes for resources with weeds, so constant weeding is required, at least until the garlic grows well established roots. For the cloves to start forming,...


2

In temperate UK, fava beans (or "broad beans" as we call them) are planted either in fall or spring. Both will crop in the summer after planting. The reasons we plant the previous year are mainly to get an earlier crop, but also for sturdier plants with better resistance to aphids etc. I planted mine in autumn/winter and am eating them now, but in the past I'...


2

Leave sowing until your early spring. Scatter the small seed (mixing with small quantity of sand may help) onto the surface of a rough peat mix and press into the surface lightly, do not cover. Temperatures cool, water by misting, only as necessary to maintain dampness, rather than soaking. Please explain what you mean by "modules"; do you mean what trays or ...


2

It’s not unusual for seed to germinate at different times, even a few days apart as you have witnessed. In my experience, this is especially the case for plants with larger seeds, such as the cucumber plant. Cucumber is traditionally a spring planted summer crop. In my experience growing vegetables in both temperate and subtropical gardens, all cucumber ...


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