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First, I'd like to give you a big thumb's up for researching the insects you saw rather than just going "On no, Bugs!" and blasting them with the nearest pesticide. According to North Carolina State University, insidious flower bugs are a great control for thrips. The damage to the leaves does look like it was done by thrips, so you could easily ...


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How about a potentilla (shrubby cinquefoil)? It's a low-growing shrub, and some cultivars will give you white flowers from spring through autumn, e.g. Potentilla fruticosa 'Abbotswood'.


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If you are okay with a deciduous plant, I can recommend Calamintha nepeta 'Montrose White' (and ONLY this cultivar). Montrose White is sterile, so once it starts flowering (mid-July in zone 5 US), it doesn't stop until frost. Before then, it forms a nice, very neat mound of glossy medium-green foliage (other calamints are very sloppy—like catmint in form—but ...


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The short answer to keeping a hydrangea small is no, it won't flower, and the same is true of finding a low growing white flowering plant that will flower all summer long, there isn't one. Iberis sempervirens flowers white and is evergreen, but flowers early, around March April; Helianthemum varieties follow on up to mid/end of June, and there are some ...


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You could consider the evergreen Pheasant Grass (Anemanthele lessoniana) which provides year-round colour and movement and a contrasting leaf style, plus it hides the stump in winter, together with a pale blue geranium (perhaps Roxanne or Phillipe Valpelle) for long-lasting contrasting summer colour. I also include Tulips in my planting scheme in front of ...


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Why not perennializing some daffodil, or other spring flowering bulb around its feet, to at least give you some action when it’s bare or cut back? A white variety might be handsome. Good luck!


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