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I've tried growing carrots from seeds inside sealed plastic bottles with LED lighting. I've written up the project here. I dried the soil before putting it in the bottle so that I could control the amount of water present in the bottle. The main challenge I found was getting the amount of water just right so that the plant has enough water, but the soil ...


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Your tree/shrub clearly has tightly clustered scale like leaves, which is typical of Cupressus species, but there are many of these and which one is hard to say. Most of the recommended species for shade are low-growing such as perennials which presumably would not be suitable for your location. Shaded areas are often used to hide such necessary features as ...


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I once grew a sweet pepper in a pot about that size on a semi-shady windowsill, but it required a lot of turning and fiddly attention to keep it growing straight and in light as much as possible and adequately watered. As I recall it produced about 3 green peppers. Alternatively strawberries would be closer to a fruit, would have somewhat restrained roots, ...


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Because you don't have particularly cold winters, you actually have lots of options for growing grass within/through pavers: Grass block pavers That article actually references a Bay Area site; it also gives examples of different types of pavers and instructions on installing them - the underlayment is not soil, but a pretty typical paver base. This UK ...


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Two critical factors are sun/shade and soil type. I have a long driveway to my place with some areas in sun, some in shade and mostly sand and sandy loam soil. In shady places traffic wears the surface to bare soil, with mossy occasional grass growing between the tire tracks, so nothing survives. In sunny parts the natural invasion of quack/couch grass (...


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Yes, its perfectly safe, though they don't produce oxygen at night time, see this Q & A do indoor plants produce carbon dioxide in night?


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In short, no. Whilst you might find a dwarf coniferous tree that you find an acceptable substitute for a christmas tree, it won't cope with being indoors year round, it will need to be outdoors for most of the year, only being brought into the house over Christmas for a short period of, say a week, two weeks maximum, and even then in as cool a spot as you ...


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I can recommend a few shrubs, most of which are relatively tall for anything close to a house: Any of the ninebarks (Physocarpus opulifolius). These include the cultivars Summer Wine, Diabolo, Little Devil, etc. Note that this species' normal growth habit is vase-shaped, and that they do NOT like shearing. In fact, they look very sad and relatively ugly ...


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You might be interested in a publication (#1286) by the Research Branch of the Canada Dept of Agriculture compiled by Sherk and Buckley "Ornamental Shrubs for Canada" 1968. It has a list of shrubs of all kinds from Acer ginnala to Weigela "Manchurian Pink" noting details such as height and hardiness zone. It has select lists by fragrance, moist/dry, acid ...


2

I would add Amelanchier alnifolia - quite hardy, good edible fruit (select a variety depending on your requirement). Most often grows to 1–8 m (3–26 ft).


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To add to Bamboo's answer, there are literally a ton of sedum species and cultivars that would work for you (again, you need excellent drainage for most of them). Any of the Sedum spectabile or Sedum telephium cultivars would give you some height, while others (Sedum acre, Sedum kamschaticum, etc) would give you ground coverage. There are also "mid-size" ...


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If you don't mind low growing succulents, then Sempervivum varieties will fit the bill in terms of sun exposure and cold in winter. The only problem with many succulents is, they do not like winter wet, so I'm not sure how viable using succulents will be if your winters are very wet. https://homeguides.sfgate.com/care-instructions-sempervivum-38113.html


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Well I would say neither bacterial nor fungal. Reason being that the leaf of Pachypodium is typically tropical in that it is thick with a waxy/shiny/hard coat surface. It's really quite difficult for an infection to get from the outside in. Much more likely for problems to arise on the inside and display signs through the most visible parts later. Recall ...


2

You need a greenhouse to grow peppers north of Zone 8 or so! It need not be expensive or complex. A cloche (single-plant greenhouse) or cold-frame (old window over a raised bed) will do nicely. Whatever you use, peppers like soil heat. They won't be happy if you can't get the soil over 21°C (70°F) or so. Ideally, you want as high as 30°C (86°F). So a raised ...


2

It is not easily done. The thistles I see usually grow in full sun which can be about 120,000 lux outside at noon. Inside illumination ranges from 100 to 500 lux, a vast difference in the light levels needed for growth and flowering. You would need to supplement the light levels with an artificial light system of some sort. High pressure sodium or metal ...


1

If the intent is not to display the planter, put in a staghorn fern. In a couple years it will cover the planter if it has good growing conditions; bright light and humidity (no soil needed).


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In terms of cold, the Euonymus japonicus is hardier; in regard to heat, all I can tell you is that Pittosporum tenuifolium grows well in USDA zones 9-11, and the Euonymus in USDA zones 6-9. The other thing to take into account is the eventual overall size - Pittosporum tenuifolium can get up to 30 feet, whereas Euonymus fortunei typically reaches between 10 ...


1

Well if that grey pot is the volume for the root ball you may be testing the capacity of the soil to hold water. The soil looks rather sandy on top, which might be good for drainage but not for holding water. Fast drainage is good for avocado, but watering every 9 days might not be sufficiently frequent, particularly as the plant gets bigger and it depends ...


1

Yellowing leaves like this usually indicate water shortage - my own palm lives on an unheated landing, and it needs watering every week with about 1-2 litres of water, depending if its summer or winter, so if yours is in average room temperatures, 10 days seems too long. Water when the surface of the potting soil feels just about dry to the touch, water ...


1

A study published in PubMed.gov concluded that "Generally the results showed that human urine compared well with urea as a source of N for crops but optimum rates depend on the sensitivity of the crops to soil salinity, which should be monitored where human urine is regularly used for fertilizing crops." There are many communities where urine is regularly ...


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None at all - human urine is a useful component on compost heaps, and if sprayed on grass, will likely make it grow thicker and greener - but only in limited in amounts,and never in contained plants. Too much uric acid for any plant in a pot, especially the amount and frequency you're talking about. Put some pants on and use the bathroom instead... UPDATE ...


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You have a variegated Hoya plant. It is a trailing plant that is fairly easy to care for. It like bright light, but will tolerate most indoor growing conditions. It has thick almost succulent leaves, so it is best to treat it like you would a succulent. Allow it to dry out before giving it water again. Water less in winter than in summer. Hoya are ...


1

It's not dying, it's just some of the fronds have suffered a bit and they look bad, but there's obvious new growth in the centre of the plant, and that's what counts. Cut the badly damaged, discoloured fronds off as close to the point of origin as you can - unfortunately, it may be exposure to the constant AC that's causing the problem, but I had a palm like ...


1

Despite the appearance, it looks like you have a viable plant here, it just needs a bit of tidying up. Probably at some time it was overwatered consistently, perhaps the root was buried too deep, and the top reacted negatively. One remediation would be to take the plant out of the pot and wash off all soil from the roots. With sharp secateurs or strong ...


1

Pretty much all plants grow towards the strongest source of light. So depending on where your table will stand, that might very well be the led. Now to actually grow a plant in there, you will need the air to exchange with the air outside the table. Otherwise the led will heat up the air too much and whatever plant you put in, will die. (Yes, even with led ...


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These are usually sold simply as 'ornamental pepper' and are varieties of Capsicum annuum; this one might be the variety 'Holiday Cheer'. They are commonly available at this time of year, because now is when they start to produce the decorative fruits. You can eat the fruits if you want, though its not always wise to do so - not only are they very hot ...


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I am not a scientist, but I have been undertaking my own self funded research for 20years. I knew that in a complex arrangement with soil bacteria, legumes added nitrogen to the soil, and that the a field is left fallow, the fertility improves, thanks to the work of weeds! I was determined to discover the role of individual plants. My discoveries are ignored ...


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Passion flower/fruit Pumpkin Squash Anything in pots layered vertically


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There are plenty of vegetables that will grow well in partial shade, but your requirement for perennials is more problematic, and harvesting shade-tolerant root vegetables like carrots, leeks, or potatoes would repeatedly disturb the tree roots. A few suggestions would be mint, rhubarb, or asparagus. If you also want flowers, hostas are related to asparagus ...


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