18

Let me preface this answer by saying that due to my experience in 2016 contrasted with my 2015 experience, I personally think soil conditions and composition, kinds of light and light levels, and how you water your tomatoes may have a profound affect on heat-tolerance. Since the temperature in your area fluctuates so much between day and night, the rules ...


17

Legumes are often used for this purpose. From Wikipedia: Legumes are notable in that most of them have symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria in structures called root nodules. And Within legume nodules, nitrogen gas from the atmosphere is converted into ammonia, which is then assimilated into amino acids (the building blocks of proteins), nucleotides (...


14

"Calorically dense"? Look at fruits. Apples, brambles (raspberry/blackberry), currants, strawberries, blueberries. Pie cherries (sweet will depend on your microclimate, pie are hardier), apricots, plums. These folks think you are wrong about soy: The soybean, agriculture's jack-of-all-trades, is gaining ground across Canada. Until the mid-1970s, ...


12

I have read the original NASA studies and the plant industry has misused the findings to sell more stock. Yes, plants do filter air but only when their metabolism is going at full speed, that means lots of light, lots of air circulation. Outside light levels in the tropics are hundreds to thousands of times more intense than anything inside your car. ...


12

Are you familiar with John Jeavons? If not, I highly recommend checking him out. I think his "How to Grow More Vegetables" is still the best resource for this type of information. Unfortunately, I can't find my copy right now, but I do have a smaller, less detailed book of his on hand, and this is what he says: If you compare all of the foods we commonly ...


11

Basically, it is going to depend on the conditions you can maintain in a car, where I live in the great basin temperatures get to 100+f and temps in a car can easily get to 140f which will pretty much kill anything green... another challenge would be physical stability, something like a sansavaria would be pretty hardy through a pretty good temperature ...


11

I recall doing something like this each spring (for several years) growing up, and the plant of choice was Marigolds (planted in a paper cup, as far as I recall) which were grown in class and then taken home at the end. Tough enough, and if grown in the classroom they can also be an educational experience while not taking up any of your growing space at ...


10

I live in USDA zone 6b (Southeastern Pennsylvania), and Pawpaws are native growers here. Cold shouldn't be an issue in 6b, but winter length may have some effect. They don't do well in really long winters. As for the conditions. Soil: What I've noticed is that these don't like compacted soil at all. Lawns are not best. Even a mowed meadow can have ...


10

All of the currant family (red, black, gooseberry, lingonberry...) do reasonably well in shade. High and low bush cranberry do well in shade. If you have light shade, look at nut trees. It will be a good while before they produce, but it's worth a look. Hickory, hazelnut, walnut, beechnut are possibilities. I recall that one of persimmon and pawpaw do ...


10

In Northeast Indiana, you're in zone 5. There should actually be quite a lot of stone fruit trees that do well for you, depending on your soil. Stone fruit trees tend to be short-lived in our climate. In my opinion, they're still worth trying. Sour cherries should do very well for you. Montmorency is an easy one to find that does well in zone 5, but North ...


9

You are going to have a very difficult time growing much in the forest portion of your land. Yes, currants and gooseberries, black raspberries, and possibly sour cherries will tolerate the shade and fruit, but most things will not. As far as vegetables go, you should be able to grow leafy greens - especially in the spring before the trees have leafed out, ...


9

It's not good for that water to be sitting around your foundation like that. I have a few suggestions that vary in the level of time, money, or practicality. The simplest is going to be to add dirt and grade the area away from the house. That's going to depend on what's around you and where you want the water to go. Hopefully, your house isn't in a hole. I ...


9

My two suggestions; Scarlet Runner Beans and the second is Carex testacea or Orange Sedge. Easy to grow, very pretty no matter its age, wonderful to tuck into any plant bed or pot, nice just left in the pot and moved around to dress up a corner or a group of pots. My second suggestion would be Scarlet Runner Beans. Tough, hardy, vigorous, fast...very ...


9

Agricultural folk certainly don't like to have those in their lot, especially if they harvest the grass for their cattle. This makes bundles of straw totally unfriendly to handle once the thistles are dried out. If some of your neighbours enjoy walking barefoot, it's the same, they will be unable to do it any more in their yard. My advice is don't let ...


8

Invasive plants that will be easy to establish and grow enthusiastically all over the fence will need cutting back every year. You might be better off compromising with something somewhat slower to establish and easier to maintain. Something also to consider is dealing with the cuttings of an enthusiastically growing plant. Woody plants are more difficult ...


8

Probably the easiest and most self-sustaining plants to grow are the invasive ones, although you have to be careful, because they are invasive. You may or may not have neighbors that care about this, and there may or may not be laws you’ll need to consider for certain kinds of plants. You might consider growing the following (not all of which are invasive): ...


8

None of those are particularly "fast" examples. Radish is fast - 3 weeks to harvest for the small types. I don't like it much, but it's fast. You'd need to let some go to seed for seeds. Since your "not actually very fast" examples seem to mostly be things that are usually propagated by clone, potatoes, sweet potatoes/yams, shallots, sunchokes, ...


8

From someone who grows a lot of their own food in a more northern climate, I would say that not only do you want calorie density, but you also need the ability to store long term. I would personally begin thinking of winter squashes (like butternut), beets, and potatoes. You should also look at long term (perennial) plants like Asparagus, rhubarb, apple ...


8

Have you considered something as simple as Garden Cress (Lepidium sativum)? You can simply hand out a pack of seeds and a piece of cotton wool. The kids can then "plant" it themselves (really just sprinkle the seeds on damp cotton wool) and watch it grow. Given how fast it grows - couple of inches a week - and that it is edible, its a pretty good learning ...


7

Lamium varieties would probably fit the bill - they come in various leaf colours, some striped, some spotted, some yellow or variegated, some almost white, and all flower, mostly lilac flowers but also yellow or white. The following are ones worth investigating: Lamium maculatum 'Anne Greenaway', L. 'White Nancy', L. Beacon Silver, L. maculatum 'Brocade', ...


7

Firstly, most grasses won’t do well indoors, so you’ll probably have to go along with a look-alike. Secondly, I don’t have edibility info on the plants I will recommend. Do not ingest any parts of those plants until you have it from a reliable source that the part is edible. The plants listed below should last indefinitely with proper care, rarely need ...


7

The only plants that can live and grow without being directly watered are called epiphytes. Some common ones grown as houseplants include: Ferns, especially Staghorn ferns Bromeliads, especially Spanish moss, Jungle cacti, like Rhipsalis Orchids, (Cattleya and Cymbidium come to mind) All of these plants, however, require light, preferably right filtered ...


7

A commercial Ontario grower lists them as hardy to Canadian zone 5 and the USDA site shows it growing as far north as Hudson Bay. It will be hardy in your area and will do best in: moist to wet soils probably best naturalized near water all types of sun exposure but full sun will need adequate access to moisture likely better with protection from wind


7

Some of the large tropical bamboos will put out new growth at a rate of 3' a day (about 1" every 40 minutes),1 which when it is a stalk diameter of over 8-10" is really rather impressive (eventually reaching over 100' in height). They can do this because of their huge, aggressive rhizome system. The new stalks come up like an asparagus stalk, then stretch ...


7

I think duckweed may take the prize for daily increase (of course, it's aquatic, and individually tiny - but it grows like mad.) Then again, possibly algae of some sort do better. Kelp or bamboo win in the "linear growth per day" sort of sweepstakes. With bamboo, it very much depends on the day, though. Giant sequoia presumably win the "seed to plant mass"...


7

If you ask yourself what wegetable you should grow at a given time, you should use a seasonality table like this one. This kind of document can help you to chose and optimize your cultures by planning at month scale every phase of your cultivated vegetables. Find a similar document at a local gardening store to be sure it is suitable to your location. To ...


7

A multitude of species can be grown for decades in pots smaller than 1 litre. Exactly what species, though, will depend upon your climate. Tropical species can be grown indoors, but (generally speaking) only if you can provide artificial light approximating sunlight. In the line of tropicals, pemphis and small leafed figs (ficus) are two species that come to ...


7

You need to contact whatever your town's version of a city planner is. If you go around planting random trees, they're liable to poison them or cut them down. They don't want them growing into peoples septic systems or breaking the sidewalk. Present your idea tot he city planner and let them know you're interested in trying to get people throughout the ...


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