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Tomatoes, and most soft fruits, need good sunlight to sweeten up as they ripen. If you're growing indoors, whilst they will ripen, they won't be as tasty and sweet as they would if grown outdoors in warm/hot sunlight. This is why tomatoes harvested in summer are sweeter than those grown in greenhouses under artificial light/heat conditions in winter - the ...


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You're having a flower! Aloe do indeed flower. It depends on plant maturity, treatment, sunshine, etc. It sounds like you're treating it well. It's not an Aloe vera (barbadensis), it's some other species. I'm more of an aloe generalist, so I won't guess at the correct ID.


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Okay, well let the soil dry out a bit more, but watering rules are these; water when the surface of the potting soil feels just about dry to the touch, but not so dry its shrunken from the sides of the pot; water well, and allow the excess to drain away freely from the base of the pot. Empty any outer pot or tray 30 minutes after watering, and again 30 ...


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Strawberries are often grown in containers - in some respects it's easier because the fruits dangle, and in a pot, that usually means over the edge rather than sitting on soil in the open ground. If you are growing indoors, you will probably need to pollinate the flowers yourself so you get fruit - outdoors they are pollinated by wind or insects. If you ...


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I think they will produce strawberries. Just keep them in shadow, and give them a lot of water. Your apartment will not be (hopefully) too hot. In any case the strawberries can survive on hot climate, just they tend to produce fruits on spring, just because they have some more light (they are a forest plant). My worry is about the lack of flowers. Usually ...


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Sansevieria can suffer from insects or fungi on the leaves but only rarely - this is mainly because the leaf surfaces are quite hard, shiny and smooth which makes it difficult for piercing or biting insects or spores to get started. If pests do attack it is most likely on roots or very young leaves, that is the soft tissues. This injury is most likely a ...


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That looks a bit like a scale infestation maybe? "Infected palms show tiny white spots on the undersides of the leaves. In time, the spots merge and the fronds look like they've been "whitewashed" or painted white. Some fronds may turn brown on top and still be white on the bottom, or they may turn brown entirely and curl up or even drop from the plant." ...


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It looks like Iresine herbstii, but it's got very leggy and badly needs cutting right back and maybe a slightly larger pot. These plants respond well to cutting back and it's usual to do this annually or biennially in spring; it should form a bushy plant with more than one main stem when it regrows. Turn it out of its current pot and check if its ...


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It looks like rust, which is a type of fungus. There are many species of rust but this could be common rust - Phragmidium spp. You should remove these leaves if you suspect it is rust to avoid further contamination. Tomato plants don't like their leaves to get wet so you should water the soil not the leaves. Looks like you are growing indoor under led ...


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A known phenomena among ferocactus species - this one possibly f. Herrerae, Juvenile spines at the tip are pink at the growth tip.


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No, this is not aloe-vera however one of its type and comes under category of succulent. These types of plants need very less water, sun-light and maintenance. You can check about these types of plant at this link. and here. Hope this helps.


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