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You might want to examine it closely with a magnifying glass to check for any infestation of insects or mites, but otherwise, the problems it has are probably cultural/environmental, partially from being mistreated in the ways you describe. It's possible the brown edges are due to sitting behind a window with that many hours of sunlight - through glass, that ...


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It is also advised to take the picture from an angle where the whole stem is visible down to the soil. A sudden death of the top part may result from basal rot, be it from overwatering or just compacted soil having difficulty draining, or a pathogen. Bamboo is correct about the yellowing of the bottom leaves: the old leaves turn yellow and fall-off first. ...


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First, I'd like to give you a big thumb's up for researching the insects you saw rather than just going "On no, Bugs!" and blasting them with the nearest pesticide. According to North Carolina State University, insidious flower bugs are a great control for thrips. The damage to the leaves does look like it was done by thrips, so you could easily ...


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It likely is Xiphidium caeruleum, called Cola de paloma in English.


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Diagnostically: Since your foliage isn’t scorched, you can rule out “too much sun” as the cause of your flower die-off, at least. I hope others can give you more specific help! :)


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If you recall, I did wonder whether both these plants had actually died of drought - your watering regime needed changing, but even with correct watering, it's not possible to bring a plant back from the dead. I see, in the bottom photo, there is a small amount of new, green growth, but the rest of that plant is likely dead, since it looks no different now ...


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