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I'm sorry to say it looks like it might be bacterial leaf spot - there were signs of that on the plant when you asked your first ID question regarding it, so I imagine it was there when you bought it. The other thing I noticed was some leaves appeared eaten, so its worth inspecting the plant thoroughly, preferably with a magnifying glass, to see if you find ...


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I have 3 red cyclamen plants. Two of them I have had for about 7 years and they have never stopped blooming. The 3rd plant I bought about 3 years ago and it has never stopped blooming either. I do lightly feed them about once per month. I do not change their soil. Right now I have 22 fully open blossoms (on the 3 plants) and many buds. For years now I kept ...


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It is Fatsia japonica, an evergreen plant that can be grown outdoors as well as inside. It tolerates low light levels well, but it does need cooler temperatures in winter, as well as not being at all happy in overheated rooms generally. Information on care indoors here https://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-fatsia-japonica-indoors-70510.html. Please inspect ...


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Looks like tipburn from too much salt (fertilisers etc), or possibly dried out.


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I would use a micorfiber cloth or cotton to clean the leaves. Unless you use wet sopallin. Dry sopallin will not remove the dust


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Mikey and Lina. Yes, you can grow a plant, even a succulent with just artificial light, as long as you have have the correct heat, meaning something around 20-25°c (70-80°f) A little higher or lower is fine. The temperature can drop at night, but the temperatures should stay above 10°c (50°f), you have the air circulation, and water. With all those ...


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Google tells me that 'sopalin' means kitchen paper or kitchen paper roll. No, don't use that, its too rough. The best thing to use is either a paintbrush (specially a larger paint brush of the type that children might use to do a painting) or a blusher brush, or any type of brush used for make up for the face. I suppose an ordinary paintbrush intended to ...


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This appears to be a Parlour Palm, Chamaedorea elegans. I don't like the look of the blackened parts, that might indicate over rather than underwatering at some point, but you can cut out damaged fronds at the base, where they arise from. I think you should move it away from the window - it's not clear whether it gets any sun, but they don't like direct ...


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It's a Dracena. Get it in some nice potting mix with lots of drainage. The roots will take off with time. For the time being, don't fertilise. Also when you water it remember the size of the roots. Little roots can't take up a huge pots worth of water. You want the soil to have plenty of air for the roots to breath. If you water log them with too ...


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As per the second question you linked to, the issue is likely the size of the container it's growing in - Jasminum sambac is a large, evergreen, scrambling plant, with a height and spread of 2.5-4 metres, with a spread up to 1.5 metres in the ground. In order to grow properly, the plant needs to form quite a widespread and deep root system as it matures, ...


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The plant has been overwatered and that combined with competition from the taller stem has caused the smaller one to die slowly. There are a number of similar questions about your plant, Dracaena Fragrans. You are best off to let the smaller stem die back and then twist the stem out of the pot and throw it away. The larger stem will be just fine if you ...


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The growth looks like it is probably some sort of ficus... some grow fairly gnarly, some grow pretty straight, training it shouldn't be different than anything else, bind with sticks and twine or wire, and trim off growth that isn't where you want it.


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It's quite normal for your Choko vine to die back in winter - it's a perennial plant that grows, flowers, fruits and dies back down when the weather gets cold. Given the variable climate where you live (seems rather like the UK for that!) it might, in some years, be low temperatures during autumn causing a problem, but it doesn't seem that you always have ...


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Leaves curl, because they are trying to conserve water. Plants that have rotted roots can not provide the plant with adequate water, this does not mean you would increase the amount of water. You need to allow the plant time to grow roots before you will see a difference in the leaves. Overall the plant does not look too bad. With time the roots with ...


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Even though you have given us very little information about where you live, your climate, where you planted it..... I believe I know the answer. I believe you do as well, based on the information you have given us. You are trying to grow a tropical plant, but you say you live in a sub-tropical region that have variable weather and can get cold in the ...


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