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You won't be able to plant in between the trees because the soil will be full of roots from them - if you dig out or break too much root material, the trees will die. Anything you attempt to plant in between will also be in direct competition with the existing trees for nutrients and moisture too. You should be able to plant 3 feet away, maybe in that strip ...


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The seed in the photo is some kind of maple ; they move well with wind so it may have come some distance.


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capital of Bulgaria (Zone 7a), Despite the fact we are in a valley which lies between 550-750 m altitude, we have healthy specimens up to 750 m in a private gardens. It's true that the foot hills of the mountain has higher minimum temperatures compared to the valley bottom since they are over the inversion sink which is prone to colect overcooled air in ...


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Looks to me like a Norfolk Island Pine. Here is a pretty good article on their care. There's a good chart of problems and treatments. To summarize: Drooping leaves, needles, or tips: Gradually move tree to get more light. Drooping branches at trunk: Water more frequently or thoroughly Overly dark needles: Gradually move tree to get more light. Yellowing ...


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This could indeed be Cypress, or maybe more likely Juniperus. I am growing for over ten years bonsai now (with ups and downs), and I certainly don't want to call myself an expert but I think I can share some tips I have learned along the way. First tip is to find material in your own neighborhood. For example, I live in Amsterdam (Netherlands), and in the ...


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It is not a pine. It looks like some type of cedar , also a conifer. An American white pine has needles in groups of 5 about 6" long, I am not familiar with Japanese. In America , east of the rocky mountains , eastern red cedar is common. Do you know the origin of the seeds ? Soil is one type of substrate.


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I find Norfolk Island Pines grow too big for a house plant in a few years with only minimal ordinary fertilizer so I would do nothing to increase growth.


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Clearly for the San Diego area it will need to be a species adapted to very dry, hot conditions which will eliminate a lot of the temperate species of the north. The San Diego Zoo site mentions three Pinus species, P. coulteri, P. halepensis and P. torreyana. The descriptions provided in sites like wikipedia don't provide sufficient detail to distinguish ...


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Hello I planted 3 Pinus Pinea Stone (Umbrella) pines at a distance less than 2 meters of the walls of my house and I began to worry if the roots of these pines after 30 years when become big will wreak harm and bring down the house and for this reason I began to watch on GOOGLE STREET VIEW whole towns and villages in Italy and Greece where there these pines ...


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