7

Yes, you can cut your leaves without the plant dying. Pruning pineapple plants is common for the very reason you're describing. If you have fruit growing (which it doesn't look like you do), then you would wait 1-2 months until after harvesting it. Here's a link that describes the pruning in more detail- https://homeguides.sfgate.com/times-prune-pineapples-...


6

The pineapple produces what are called "suckers" in the axils of the leaves below the fruiting top, as opposed to "crown" pieces from above the fruit or "slips" from the base. These will produce leaves first and then if left alone they will produce a "ratoon crop" of small pineapples. To judge from the colour of the pineapple on your plant (BTW looks ...


3

If your plant doesn't want to flower by itself, you can try to stimulate it with ethylene gas. There are more ways to get this gas, but the easiest way is to use apple pieces and put them close to the rosette. Here are more methods described for ethylene gas production in order to stimulate flowering in Ananas.


2

If this is coming from the base of the pineapple plant it is likely just a sucker; this is the way that pineapples reproduce vegetatively. The mother plant reaches a state of maturity, usually by producing a thick stem with a pineapple on top. Then its work is done, so the mother plant produces suckers at the base and possibly slips underneath the ripening ...


1

I find they take a long time to break down in my compost bin. The more surface area a substance has the more area there is for it to be broken down by microbes and other small creatures. To create that surface area the best thing is to chop it up as much as you can.


1

The crown leaves likely contain a semi-valuable fibre; there is a variety of pineapple specifically grown for those fibres. They are very fine and durable, so the leaves will, yes, take a while to break down. Pulling the crown apart into its separate leaves would help to break them down more quickly. You could consider using the crown to propagate more ...


1

Getting sunlight through glass windows is filtered light at best.. tropical plants of this nature like lots of direct sun, especially in cooler climates.. consider moving her just outside that glass door, using apple slices may help, but also feed with a blooming and rooting formula (higher phosphate on the NPK rating) something like product in photo but ...


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