9

There are a less and less ways to do this fast since the 2009 ban on using pesticides in Ontario. Your goal is get your lawn to grow roots faster than the three different species of grubs can eat them. nematodes can provide some control but are fussy to apply and should be reapplied yearly. Best recommended way to apply is: applied with a hose end sprayer....


9

This paper reviews toxicological data from human and animal studies regarding neem derived pesticides. I don't have access to the full paper but in the abstract it says that The non-aqueous extracts appear to be the most toxic neem-based products, with an estimated safe dose (ESD) of 0.002 and 12.5 microg/kg bw/day. Less toxic are the unprocessed ...


8

To answer your first question, I'm not sure what kind of chemicals store bought roses are usually treated with. Short answer: a lot. These flowers (especially when they're roses) don't really have much room for defects, so pesticides are applied heavily as a preventative, even when there are no symptoms of disease or pests on the plants. Most of these ...


8

If you're using 25 gallons of water, you are using only 25% the amount of water on the mixing instructions, so use only 25% the amount of concentrate, around 1-2 quarts. Application rate is 100-800 gallons of mix per acre, but with only a dozen or so trees you're looking at significantly less than an acre. Figure out how much of an acre you're working with ...


8

Read the label of the product you are using. The label will state a re-entry interval. Without the label we don't know what is in the specific spray you are using, so we can't give a proper answer.


7

It's extremely helpful that you included the actual ingredient list in your question, rather than a brandname - thank you! So you know, I grow anything that I eat organically and this question is one of the reasons why I do (the other reason is that I was once a Certified Pesticide Applicator for five years, and the training you receive to get that ...


6

The MSDS lists three active ingredients, and another product, Bonide BK-32 has the same formulation (active ingredients and proportions). Bonide BK-32's instruction booklet includes the following notes in various portions of the booklet: Do not allow people (other than applicator) or pets on treatment area during application. People and pets may enter ...


6

Yes of course you can fertilize them after you put all those pesticide on them. But next time, you must fertilize them before anything bad happen to them! I know and am sorry it is too late. In fact, most plants get diseases and attract pests because they are not healthy enough. To avoid having to treat your plants, you should choose plants adapted to ...


6

Predatory mites that eat spider mites might help. You can buy them, but they may be expensive. Make sure to remove any substances left on the plants that might kill the predatory mites. We have a similar problem. This may not be an option for you, but I decided just not to start my garden plants indoors because of the spider mites. They didn't seem to be a ...


5

It's a complicated picture, because the ladybug population is affected differently depending on how often you're using imidaproclid and how soon after application the ladybugs are around. In general though, the population of ladybugs in areas untreated with any type of insecticide is higher than in areas where insecticide has been used. The link here details ...


5

You probably have an Aphid problem - it's not a disease per se and it's not mold, just an infestation. They leave the white gooey stuff on the bottom of the leaves. I use Bug-B-Gone and it seems to work fine. You can buy it in a concentrate and then mix with water and spray with a spray bottle. I think it's about 15 bucks from Home Cheapo or amazon. If you ...


5

Giles. Not really...there is no black and white but better a light gray. Sooner one treats aphids the better. Hard spray of water, NEEM sprayed at night as soon as you see crowds of aphids on your roses or vegetables. But if you are on your way to a well-deserved vacation and as you go out the door and catch sight of aphids, keep going to your vacation. ...


5

I find that if you destroy the webs with a stick or something the spiders will tend to move on after a while to less disturbed locations. You probably have a lot of spiders because there's a lot of food available for them. I would consider it a good thing personally. If you just want your yard to look good for guests, I suggest cleaning up their webs ...


5

Spider mites like warm, dry conditions and will thrive in such an environment, so it sounds as if that's what you've provided them with. Plumeria species like to be kept evenly moist from spring through summer, with significantly reduced watering in winter when they're dormant. They also like moderate air humidity - humidity and a plant that's well watered ...


4

Firstly, it's generally a good idea to wear gloves and maybe long sleeves when dealing with a plant you don't recognize. It's hard to tell what this plant is without a closer picture of the leaves but you can look out for distinct features of the leaves and, if present, flowers or fruit. A quick search online should provide you with comparison images and ...


4

Some oils are helpful at controlling some insect problems. They suffocate the insects and are not toxic to humans or animals when properly applied. The problem with using higher concentrations is that a concentrated solution will burn or kill the plant. Solutions that are not toxic can also be problematic as they will dry to a sticky surface that will pick ...


4

Any good maintenance company either leaves a 'report' explaining any chemical treatments (organic or synthetic) for the homeowner or places flags with explanations as to treatment. If your company is not doing this it is entirely proper to ask them to do so, and retroactive as well! If you are using 'Organic' you should never see FAST changes. There are ...


4

As the renowned Stephie has pointed out in the comment this is Whitefly which is a very common pest. The scales are discarded pupae cases from the larvae. The key in pest control is to: remove other sources of whitefly which can reinfect the plant. Are other plants infected? Remove them and isolate this plant from healthy ones spray with 5ml dish soap ...


4

Check the plants carefully, examining them closely to make sure there is no evidence of spider mite (webbing, tiny red or brownish insects). Assuming there isn't anything to find, you've said the plants in the photographs are 4-5 years old, and you have two other plants which are only 2 years old which are fine. If the 4-5 years old plants which are showing ...


4

Diatomaceous earth as an insecticide requires that the bugs slide across the surface of the DE which then acts as little razors shredding their epithelial layers so that they lose the ability to retain fluids, and so dehydrate and die. So, if your caterpillars are hiding in a nest, and don't come out, it won't affect them. Maybe you can use a high pressure ...


4

I've no experience if any spinosins, none have been approved for use in the EU or the UK, but I did find this http://sitem.herts.ac.uk/aeru/ppdb/en/Reports/1144.htm#none which suggests (near the end, under Ecotoxicology) that bees will be affected, both by oral and contact routes. Its just technical data really and not dissimilar from your first link, ...


4

It's name is spelled as Imidan, it is available only in some countries and it doesn't protect against fungus because it is an insecticide. Although it can be used against pests, it is highly toxic to bees, so unless you can artificially pollinate your apples, you run the risk of killing those beneficial insects. Alternate names include Appa, Decemthion, ...


4

This insect is the Harlequin cabbage bug. After examining the picture linked to by pnuts, I returned to the garden and found instances of both versions of this bug. I assume that these two colorations represent the adult male and female forms of the insect. These are highly destructive pests, both in their adult and nymph forms. The simplest way to control ...


3

Well, looking at the 'compost' in the pot, its obviously full of decaying matter - the creatures you're seeing appear to be millipedes, which feed on decaying matter. They don't cause trouble in open ground, but a population as high as this in a pot isn't desirable. First, you need some decent potting mix, so if you've got some already, you can proceed now ...


3

There are plenty of organic versions you could use that will not leave a bad taste, you could just flush out the soil before harvesting and make sure all the foliage is washed carefully before eating/consuming. below is some recipes iv used in the past... Eucalyptus Oil A great natural pesticide for flies, bees, and wasps. Simply sprinkle a few drops of ...


3

Your question gives the answer. It says use either a 1-2% mix, or up to 8%.


3

Insecticidal soaps only need a few minutes to be effective. A rinse to wash the soap off after a few applications is highly recommended to prevent the buildup of fatty acids on the "business" part of the leaf where gaseous exchange goes on. Some plants such as african violets do not respond well to soap treatments. Either they have more delicate leaves or ...


3

If you can water by pouring the water directly on the potting mix, it doesn't matter, you can water anytime. If your plant is under an overhead irrigation system, then of course you want to water before you spray, or wait until the spray has dried, or you will wash it off of the plant, and the application will be rendered useless for the most part.


3

A word about Round up - this is a systemic herbicide which works 'through the green', which means it needs plants to be growing strongly, with plenty of leaves and growth, to be most effective. If you want to kill these plants with it, you will need to spray all the leaves and stems, and NOT cut them down first. Not sure what they are, picture's a bit fuzzy ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible