10

I don't think those are eggs. I think they are aphids. Put your gloves on and squish them. It will be easiest, and little is in fact lost, to just remove heavily infested tissue, such as the leaf you show; crush it as you discard it. A jet from your garden hose will usually remedy problems before they become serious if you just make a habit of 'blasting' ...


9

Another point of view. The beetles usually only attack trees that are compromised healthwise. They don't generally attack small trees. By the time the trees are large enough to attack, the beetles will have moved on, looking for new food sources, and the trees are going to be no more susceptible than any others. The trees should be kept healthy; the ...


9

Those are grubs. There are a lot of kinds of grubs, though, and they look so similar, you often can only tell them apart by their rear ends (seriously, see below) They feed on roots (usually turf, but also trees, perennials, and other plants) as larvae, and then emerge from the ground as beetles, which feed on the leaves. I think they might be masked chafer ...


9

Your Pokemons are waxy scale, or coccidae. Your description in the comments above is spot on: another name is "tortoise scale". The Florida wax scale (Ceroplastes floridensis) looks quite similar, but I wouldn't venture a definitive id based on a few photos, Ceroplastes japonicus (pictures) is another possible candidate, and there are more Ceroplastes. As ...


8

this looks like ant damage to me; whatever did the damage, there must be some sign of them... I dont know what kind of tree it is, but it isn't a cherry... I think this tree is pretty much dead, if you cut it down below the damage and it regrows, it could be ok, but I think whatever kind of tree it is, it is vulnerable to whatever kind of damage this is, ...


7

If anything, I have heard arguments (likely anecdotal) that plants like Tarragon and Basil actually repel some insects, possibly at a range of a few feet. Roses on the other hand, tend to be victimized by a wide range of insects and diseases regardless of what they are planted near. They are not exactly a low maintenance plant. I would suggest searching ...


6

The pictures help a lot. These trees were eaten back, but not too far for a good recovery. The fastest way to get them looking normal will be shearing. Shear back the areas the deer didn't hit, and while you're at it, you can do the others, to match. Do not cut past the growth line, where there are plenty of green stems to regrow from. Also, don't cut the ...


6

I love chickens, but let's not forget beneficial nematodes: From The Royal Horticultural Society You can buy pathogenic nematodes, Heterorhabditis megidis or H. bacteriophora, which attack the larvae by infecting them with a fatal bacterial disease. These microscopic animals can be watered into the lawn when the ground is moist and soil temperature range ...


6

Since poorly maintained blueberry bushes can be pruned right to the ground, it's likely your plants will survive their animal pruning. You will need to tidy them up though, and protect them from animal damage in the future. The good thing is you are in the right month in the northern hemisphere to prune. www.fruit.cornell.edu/berry/production/pdfs/...


6

Those look like Blister Beetles: http://ipm.ncsu.edu/AG295/pics/fig171.gif They will chew up the leaves, and not just on your potatoes. They are toxic, so just be careful when treating them! More information here: https://www.planetnatural.com/pest-problem-solver/garden-pests/blister-beetle-control/ Blister beetles are a common field and garden pest best ...


6

Skunks, perhaps but rabbits almost certainly. Have you seen any track? Deer are very obvious as well as any animal's track. This looks like rabbit to me, since I've been feeding rabbits and having to protect everything I don't want eaten. Big semicircular bites. Any other leafy plants getting eaten? That Christmas cactus has been over watered by the way....


5

The long split probably is canker, Maples are susceptible to it. The full name of one variety that affects Maples is Eutypella Canker. There are other species specific fungal cankers as well. It's a fungal oozing infection that gets into wounds and kills the cambium layer. I would have a tree professional have a look at it as it will affect the future ...


5

First picture: The picture appears to be powdery mildew, up close it would be a cottony fungal colony growing on the leaf. Your watering schedule is quite likely making the situation somewhat worse. Powdery mildew grows most aggressively under high-moisture and moderate temperature environments. Your 9 PM watering is ensuring the moisture part of the ...


5

You probably have an Aphid problem - it's not a disease per se and it's not mold, just an infestation. They leave the white gooey stuff on the bottom of the leaves. I use Bug-B-Gone and it seems to work fine. You can buy it in a concentrate and then mix with water and spray with a spray bottle. I think it's about 15 bucks from Home Cheapo or amazon. If you ...


5

In my experience, this kind of hole is often caused by slugs. Slugs stay hidden during the sunlight period and pop out during wet night and rainy days, making them difficult to spot. Note that it can be caterpillar, thumbtack (not sure of this translation) or even birds. For identifing the "pest", watch for your plants patiently and minutely. To fight the ...


5

What you're seeing there is quite normal callous formation - it's a bit like a scab when you've cut yourself. The cause of the corky callous layers is damage - either from insects, or sudden chilling, physical injury and sometimes, underwatering in summer. I'm no cacti expert, but it's possible, from your description of some of the new growth 'dissolving' ...


5

No, they're not the same problem by the sound of it, though it could be. What you seem to be describing on your beans are leafminers, which are the larvae from eggs laid inside the leaf by a female fly that looks greyish in appearance. As the eggs hatch, the larvae then tunnel their way through the leaf, eating as they go. As this is is an edible crop, you ...


5

In addition to the answer already given, the appearance of shelf or bracket fungus on the stump means it's dying, or doomed to die, anyway. The fungal mycelium will have invaded the heartwood of the stump, and the fruiting bodies you now see on the outside are the signal that's its well on its way to breaking down the wood of the tree. The shoots you ...


5

I agree with the answers from our fellow gardeners Bamboo and Stormy. Grub out the stump now and don't encourage another EAB visit to your neighbourhood. The remnants of the tree will grow until the stems become thick enough for EAB to make another visit. Searches in this forum will show a few interesting opinions along the lines of "after ten or twelve ...


5

It is a Swiss chard. Just it had too much stress (cold?) so too many gems are awakes quickly, and they started to produce leaves. I would possibly expect also that the chard will start the second-year cycle, so start to flowering. Sometime it just happen. I don't know why, but Swiss chards are particular prone to this (other vegetables just die or remain ...


5

This is not swiss chard. This is Tatsoi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tatsoi The chard seed looks completely different than the brassica family seed of tatsoi. Tatsoi seed would look identical to the butter lettuce seed. The holes in the plant look like cabbage worms. The picture with the dark poop at the base reinforces my hypothesis. You can pick ...


5

There is nothing you can do to save the tree at this point: It has been girdled by a sapsucker, which means that the roots are effectively dead. Knowing that the damage was caused by a bird of that genus, you could keep an eye out for such birds and for similar patterns of damage. Until a tree has been completely girdled it can usually still be saved.


5

They are not a source of anything other than a bit of a nuisance - their tunnels might mean they've destroyed some roots of plants as they make them, but they don't eat plant material. Molehills in lawns make it difficult to mow, so there is a need to remove those to try to keep the lawn somewhat level. More information here https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/...


5

Aphids are always with us - they're flying insects and can affect indoor plants (especially in summer) as well as outdoor ones. Using a soapy water spray may well kill any which are currently present, but will not prevent more arriving. As this is not a food plant (meaning you're not going to be eating any part of it) you can use a systemic insecticide. ...


5

You can reduce sparrow numbers by changing what you're feeding the birds. House sparrows tend to like small seeds like corn, oats, wheat, and other types of grain seeds. According to this site, sparrows really like millet and cracked corn (maize). What they DON'T like is sunflower seeds, if those are available in your area. Changing your feed is far ...


4

I had/have the same problem -as they never go away, keep coming back once they get used to one solution. Check if there are no chipmunks, they might also be digging and making a mess. I have used moth balls and it worked for a while. When they came back to a different area -I have a very small flower bed area- now I'm using the pepper solution w/o jalapenos ...


4

Chili pepper oil or garlic should work in the short term but you can't be out there applying it every other day. I will admit to buying some fox urine from a hunting supply store and that made them scarce for a while. It too suffers from loosing effectiveness unless reapplied on a regular basis. I've found that most rabbits will eat a wide variety of ...


4

That doesn't look like a slug, because it looks like it has segments. I think it's a caterpillar. And that looks more like caterpillar excrement. But if it is an unusually marked slug, it will be slimy. Caterpillars are dry, and have legs. Whatever the case, good job finding it. Getting rid of it is easy and disgusting. You should pick it off (you don't have ...


4

Not to worry, this guy does suck on your tree but they rarely do any damage. It is a Spittlebug or Froghopper. Each of those globs is one insect, a nymph that manages to hide himself in...excrement by bubbling a viscous liquid. This is great protection from predators and the elements. Easy to control, just spray with a hard stream of water. Your tree ...


4

Cedars or arborvitae can take a lot of damage by pruning or being eaten. As you have found on the web even severely damaged trees will grow back but the question is how long will it take. I see cedar hedges that have been topped, about the worst thing you could do to an evergreen, after two or three years you would not know. The real question is what can ...


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