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Citronella plants are toxic to cats and dogs, although their reaction depends on the type of exposure and how long for. Most cats do not like the scent of the plant and will avoid it, though dogs are less selective about it. There are some reports of citronella oil poisoning in cats, but not much testing has been done, see here https://www....


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I don’t think individually treating each plant is the best approach - that would need a lot of time and persistence and with a bit of bad luck get you into a cycle of re-infestation where the mites and mealybugs jump from one plant to the next. There are two approaches you should consider when you have an infestation in all your plants and throwing them out ...


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I realise this is a late response, but I am leaving this behind for anyone who might come to this question later on. [EDIT: In addition the advice listed below, it is a good idea to look at this, more thorough answer - How do I identify and control spider mites I am not a plant expert by any standards whatsoever, but I have dealt with spider mites on my ...


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Let me restate my understanding of your question for clarity: Do you think using more greenhouses instead of the alternative could reduce environmental pesticides that are harmful to bees, and thus help the bee population to improve? I certainly think it's possible. However— Not all areas are well-suited for greenhouses. Some require more temperature ...


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That looks like Hellebore aphid; you can hose them off, or use the remedies you've tried, but none of these will give lasting control, they will just get rid of what's there when you treat, which means you will need to retreat probably every day or two. If you use neem spray, remember to spray beneath the leaves too, because neem should have more of a ...


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I use actual chemical insecticide (responsibly and according to instructions) and it does a really good job at controlling aphids on my roses.


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Don't bother trapping. If they have a solid food source from the fields behind then you don't stand a chance as an individual competing manually against rodent reproduction rates. Reproduction: As some of the most prolific breeders in the rodent family, voles can produce 5-10 litters per year with 3-6 young per litter. Voles reproduce throughout the ...


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The first two plants look like they have slug damage. This is possibly the case with the third, depending on how large the leaf is (right now, it looks like the holes are too small). A good way to confirm is to either visit the garden at night (especially if it's humid/wet) or to put a beer trap under the plants at ground level. You'll either see the slugs ...


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I have about 10 Segos in E. TX,I just looked and found mine have similar spots. But mine have fewer,from 50% to only 10% of the numbers of spots yours has. I see no pests. No answer; but a crazy guess- We had a hail storm about 6 weeks ago , my three largest segos are protected under trees and have the least spots ( less than 10% yours). Have you had hail ?


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Old hose or polypipe pieces make good hoops, and fit nicely onto sticks in the edge of pots. Ask for some on Freecycle. If you have the time, removing the eggs works, especially for the smallest seedlings.


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For cabbage moth/loopers netting should be quite fine, of the order of 5-7mm. square rather than 15mm. If the 15 is all you have available might want to double up the layers if you have enough. Row covers (very fine netting) are often supported by wire hoops, but plain netting can be supported by sticks and branches stuck in the soil in various strategic ...


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This is not so much an answer as a bit of guidance to start with and some things for you to think about/answer. The first thing to do is cut down all the overgrown grass and weeds, then you can see what you're dealing with, and it would be useful to see more pictures once you've done that. It does look as though any grass has a high percentage of weed; if ...


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No, I too thought this was a crazy situation. I know I'm a year late responding to everyone else. I bought a home in Fontana,CA a year ago and these ground gophers are the size of guinea pigs. They burrow and eat anything with roots in the ground. I was told by farmers in the area and they say to put 4-6" below ground a layer of chicken wire to keep them ...


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