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My belief is that frogs (and toads) try to return to wherever they were spawned. That should mean if you provide a suitable pond and seed it with frog-spawn, the little guys will be jumping for joy next season.


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They are known as Fungus gnats in English. There are many tips and tricks, but like you have already noticed none of them are bullet proof. Here an example of a recent post with the same question. My own experience is that these gnats always come back, but you can keep them under control a bit. The nematode treatment, like you tried already, works very good ...


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Be careful to only pick native species. If you want to introduce toads into your garden for pest control, I have one word of warning for you: make sure to only use a species of toad native to the area you live in. In Australia, in the 1930s, someone had a very similar idea to you, and they decided to import some South American toads, in the hopes that they ...


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There's a natural control for mosquito larva in the form of BT bacteria. This is the same bacteria who's genome was used to source the genes added to corn and other crops to reduce pest damage. The bacteria can be bought as a small jar/cannister of granules that float in water and are coated with bacterial spore. I found about about them when I was looking ...


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We caught a bunch of toads on the roads when I was a kid for a frog jumping contest, and put them in our yard when it was over. We've had toads in the neighborhood ever since. They poop around the yard (mostly on the sidewalks), and by examining it, I can tell they eat a lot of pill bugs (which we also have in abundance). I believe they'll eat ladybugs, too, ...


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Everyone should have some frogs and toads ; unfortunately you will probably not notice a difference in bothersome insects . I have a 10' X 5' pond , then added an 8' diameter one and accidently have a 55 gal aquarium full of rainwater. I have large numbers of frogs and toads ; I cannot list them but everything from bull frogs to at least 2 kinds of tree ...


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Perhaps the first question to ask is "Is this property suitable for frogs?" and following on from that "If it is, why are there not frogs here already?" I have many, many frogs on my property since I am close to a wetland, so their noise in Spring is quite loud. There are also many snakes here which like to have frogs for lunch, but there ...


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I had the same problem with my tomatoes and common sage, it got rectified, you can use an organic insecticide in dilute form to tackle the problem. I used Neem oil solution with water. Caution: I had used a larger concentration earlier which led drying of my leaves, which is similar to what you got. After diluting the concentration, and spraying it 2-3 times ...


2

I use snail bait in a feeding station so the bait doesn’t get mouldy. Lasts for months. If placed in a shady place near moisture then dead snails can be found in this structure, proving it works. Two pot trays - one small to hold bait and one big as a roof. Two half bricks. Bait containing Fe.EDTA as active ingredient - to avoid off-target poisoning. I have ...


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I know that if you have planted either vegetables or flowers in a container and you don't want to have snails start eating your plants, you can obtain some copper tape that's literally made of copper (you can get it on Amazon or other retailers online). This should prevent any snail from finding its way to your plants.


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There is nothing wrong with your soil, although the fact it has a high clay content means it may hang on to water for longer, which is not a bad thing for plants, but will make good conditions for slugs and snails because they need moisture. Snails hibernate during winter, but when active, they lay eggs; each one can lay up to 80 eggs each time,and these ...


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I had a recent similar incident when aphids attacked one of 3 plants. I don't know why the insects attacked the one plant and not the others since they were identical species and in identical pots and soil. The solution for this situation was to drastically prune back all affected green growth on the one plant, burn the infected shoots and with the problem ...


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Let's start with what I can see: I know you say those mealybugs are dead but they look quite healthy to me. The brown bumps on the stems could be scale or might be ladybugs who have arrived to eat the mealybug That is a major infestation of a pest that is hard to control. What you have been using is a contact pesticide.The active agent is the oil which is ...


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