16

Perhaps the first question to ask is "Is this property suitable for frogs?" and following on from that "If it is, why are there not frogs here already?" I have many, many frogs on my property since I am close to a wetland, so their noise in Spring is quite loud. There are also many snakes here which like to have frogs for lunch, but there ...


15

You can't get rid of them, if you like it or not: they are part of your garden. If the ants come close to or even in your house, you can try to control them with some poison. But get rid of them completely is really impossible, you'll need so much poison that you'll kill much more than only the ants colony. I see on your photo that they are on a tile, or ...


8

Be careful to only pick native species. If you want to introduce toads into your garden for pest control, I have one word of warning for you: make sure to only use a species of toad native to the area you live in. In Australia, in the 1930s, someone had a very similar idea to you, and they decided to import some South American toads, in the hopes that they ...


7

We caught a bunch of toads on the roads when I was a kid for a frog jumping contest, and put them in our yard when it was over. We've had toads in the neighborhood ever since. They poop around the yard (mostly on the sidewalks), and by examining it, I can tell they eat a lot of pill bugs (which we also have in abundance). I believe they'll eat ladybugs, too, ...


6

"Whitefly" is actually many different species of insect which cannot be distinguished visually but do not interbreed with each other. It is quite likely that different species have different temperature tolerances. This study showed about 90% survival of adult whitefly at 4C, and about 60% survival at 0C. The study did not include eggs or pupae ...


6

This site has some good information on organic control; personally, I prefer the vinegar & sticky traps that they mention. I would use at least one of the methods documented in this site (which you already have - hydrogen peroxide). For clarity for future readers (in case that site goes down), these methods are: Reducing the frequency of watering so ...


6

Everyone should have some frogs and toads ; unfortunately you will probably not notice a difference in bothersome insects . I have a 10' X 5' pond , then added an 8' diameter one and accidently have a 55 gal aquarium full of rainwater. I have large numbers of frogs and toads ; I cannot list them but everything from bull frogs to at least 2 kinds of tree ...


3

I know that if you have planted either vegetables or flowers in a container and you don't want to have snails start eating your plants, you can obtain some copper tape that's literally made of copper (you can get it on Amazon or other retailers online). This should prevent any snail from finding its way to your plants.


3

There is nothing wrong with your soil, although the fact it has a high clay content means it may hang on to water for longer, which is not a bad thing for plants, but will make good conditions for slugs and snails because they need moisture. Snails hibernate during winter, but when active, they lay eggs; each one can lay up to 80 eggs each time,and these ...


3

The black flies in the soil are probably fungus gnats, Coffee grounds aren't known to be a control, but sand and diatomaceous earth on the top of the soil are known controls, so perhaps the coffee grounds may take care of the problem. It would be interesting to know if that's the case. This site indicates that there may be problems with uncomposted grounds ...


3

Roly poly bugs don't generally eat living plant material or seeds - they are part of nature's clean up squad and primarily consume decomposing or decaying material, and will only start nibbling on live plants if there are too many of them. Clear away any dead plant material, general debris, rotting wood (including very decomposed wood chips) which is in or ...


3

I have buried chicken wire under my lawn close to the back fence. This is in South West England. We had a problem with rats burrowing under the fence and coming up near the bird feeder. They would then take seeds, peanuts and suet back down their burrow to, presumably, their nest. We tried several ways of stopping them, obviously worried that the rats ...


3

These are springtails (Collembola) and are completely harmless. They are soil dwelling invertebrates and live of dead plant material and graze from fungus that grows on dead material. Although they have 6 legs, they are technically not real insects. Instead of wings they have a furca which is the jumping device they have under the tail. From an evolutionary ...


3

These ants look like the harmless kind, there's no need to mess with them. If, however, they get near or inside the house try pouring some rubbing alcohol, or something similar (not gasoline, etc), down their nest and a few feet around it and light them on fire. Keep doing it till they abandon that nest/die off. Not a pro or anything but I have had great ...


2

I just placed poultry netting under my front yard before we laid sod. Our Giant Schnauzer and Airedale had previously dug it to pieces. It was their favorite area and they truly tore it up. They have not even attempted to dig in it since, which is miraculous. The grass and plants don't seem to do so very well, though. Wondering if it might be a high zinc ...


2

When controlling Puncturevine there are numerous methods to reduce the growth of this plant. There is The mechanical approach in which using a hoe in early spring and summer to cut the plant off at its tap root will aid in the reduction of the plant. Then if mulch is applied afterwards that will also cut down on the growth of the plant. In short by cutting ...


2

Three things come to mind - assuming you don't want to just spray toxic chemicals. First you could sprinkle diatomaceous earth on the soil around your seeds and plants. This will repel and/or kill through causing micro-abrasions in their exoskeletons leading to desiccation - at least in theory. Another option might be to provide an alternative, more ...


2

SOLVED: I diagnosed this, it's Spider Mites which Calatheas are quite prone to. If you're noticing these marks on your Calatheas, please take action and get them cleaned ASAP!


2

Other option could be thrips based on that you have seen tiny, tiny insects. There are many species but most commonly they are white and very tiny as said. In my experience they are very hard to notice if you do not know what you are dealing with. Chances are high that you will see the browning spots and other damage on your plant first. Note that fully ...


2

You could read the information on your winter wash (but probably too generic, so a "it is possible that"). It depends also on the type of bricks (usually they are clay, so never put acid stuffs on them). Bricks are often porous: you may notice it, that wet brick (rain) are usually much darker. Oil will just attach on them, and it is difficult (and ...


2

I have these fungus gnats also often, and especially in indoor plant containers they are a nuisance. Very annoying. When I am fed up with them (i.e. become a pest) I always use a biological control method to get rid of them. It is a treatment with nematodes (Steinernema feltiae), which parasite on the larvae of these fungus gnats. You can buy them online, I ...


2

There's a natural control for mosquito larva in the form of BT bacteria. This is the same bacteria who's genome was used to source the genes added to corn and other crops to reduce pest damage. The bacteria can be bought as a small jar/cannister of granules that float in water and are coated with bacterial spore. I found about about them when I was looking ...


2

I use snail bait in a feeding station so the bait doesn’t get mouldy. Lasts for months. If placed in a shady place near moisture then dead snails can be found in this structure, proving it works. Two pot trays - one small to hold bait and one big as a roof. Two half bricks. Bait containing Fe.EDTA as active ingredient - to avoid off-target poisoning. I have ...


2

This looks like a swarm of bees. Please don't kill these animals, but call a bee keeper. They will normally take these bees away for free. If you don't know a bee keeper nearby, please try something like the animal ambulance (or animal welfare organization that is active in your region). For example, here in the Netherlands (where I live), the bee keepers ...


2

Each spring when the snow recedes, the meadows where we live (Black Forest, Germany) show a true maze of carved-out pathways just like in your pictures. They are caused by mice that rather burrow at the border between soil and snow in search of food. They use them to get from one place to another, they are not made to purposely destroy your lawn. Other ...


2

In Australia, we use a product called "Ant Rid" for indoors, and refer to outdoor-equivalent granules as "Ant Sand". If you can't source that where you are, apparently the equivalent can be achieved using Borax (with some sweetener); https://www.bhg.com.au/how-to-get-rid-of-ants Essentially they are sweetened baits that don't kill the ...


1

The First step would be to get rid of the grubs (cockchafer grubs live 3-4 years in the soil). I guess you already did that by replacing the soil. I don't know about mulch, but insect nets definitely help. You can put them on your pots like a tent. For cockchafers, you only need to keep them up the month or two they are flying and probably only from late ...


1

They are known as Fungus gnats in English. There are many tips and tricks, but like you have already noticed none of them are bullet proof. Here an example of a recent post with the same question. My own experience is that these gnats always come back, but you can keep them under control a bit. The nematode treatment, like you tried already, works very good ...


1

Let's start with what I can see: I know you say those mealybugs are dead but they look quite healthy to me. The brown bumps on the stems could be scale or might be ladybugs who have arrived to eat the mealybug That is a major infestation of a pest that is hard to control. What you have been using is a contact pesticide.The active agent is the oil which is ...


1

The tiny black flies in the soil are fungus gnats, so neem oil won't work on them. My answer to this question contains some ways to organically handle these insect sas well as a link to more specific information.


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