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I grow outside hydropnically. and after a couple of years they start to look like small trees. If it freezes I bring them in. Going on 3 years. Green pepper, jalapno, serrano, and poblamo. Peppers year round. Houston. Determinate is for canning. The fruit ripens at the same time. Indeterminate ripens different times throughout the year.


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I always like to add that the soap will kill them on contact, so you can rinse the plant thoroughly immediately after treatment.


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One summer when I was growing pepper plants I looked down and I see this one little baby pepper plant at the base of one of the big ones. Well I live in Pennsylvania and the winner was rolling around and I was bringing in all of my plants and I wanted to try to keep from dying and as it is getting colder and colder out and frost is coming I just couldn't ...


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Ontario Canada here. Currently have a bell pepper plant that's over a year old. Indoors during winter. Currently has ripening peppers on it in April 🤷‍♀️ definitely possible yall lol


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Any bhut jolokia variety I have planted in the last 8 years has always showed vigorous sucker growth. I have picked them off at your stage and I have let them grow out. The plant will get taller and have more of a canopy if you pick off the suckers. If you let the suckers grow out, you'll have a very bushy plant. I prefer picking off the suckers because it ...


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You need a greenhouse to grow peppers north of Zone 8 or so! It need not be expensive or complex. A cloche (single-plant greenhouse) or cold-frame (old window over a raised bed) will do nicely. Whatever you use, peppers like soil heat. They won't be happy if you can't get the soil over 21°C (70°F) or so. Ideally, you want as high as 30°C (86°F). So a raised ...


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If I had to choose, I'd go with a "birds eye pepper". I feel they've been a lot more prominent on the market really. I have about 100 seed catalogs that come every year...( and probably a problem 😉)... It could be a lot of other things though, unfortunately. Birdseye peppers are just a bit hitter than jalapeños.


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Unfortunately it's almost impossible to positively identify a specific chilli type from a picture. There are some named types such as Jalapeno, Cayenne, Anaheim, Fresno, and so on which have been around long enough to have settled down to a well defined appearance, but also a huge number of hybrids which may look very similar but have been given another ...


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If you know your soil is not good and if you want the best chance of success. I would suggest purchasing some quality potting soil and growing the plant in a pot. If you are starting the seeds indoors. It will take about 8-10 weeks before the plant is strong enough to be transplanted in the pot with good soil. From personal experiences, the hotter the pepper ...


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It's probably phosphorus deficiency exacerbated by the cold. Just give it some monoammonium phosphate, or monopotassium phosphate; or else fertilize it generally (make sure your fertilizer has enough phosphorus) and warm up your plant, and the new growth should clear up. Cold weather can make plants require more phosphorus; it can make phosphorus less ...


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In most cases, yes. Dehydration by itself does not significantly deteriorate pepper seeds viability. In fact, that's how most people store their seeds for future use. However, the quality of the seeds might be affected depending on the dehydration process that the pepper went through. If the pepper/seeds got heated to make the dehydration process faster, ...


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Silverleaf Whitfly Update: as well as aphids they lay eggs on the underside of the leaves and if you disturb them they fly away don't use any chemical sprays as they become used to it and if only makes problems worse. 1 teaspoon liquid soap 1 litre of clean water optional ( one drop of neem oil) make a soapy water solution using nontoxic washing up ...


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I'm sorry to say it looks like it might be bacterial leaf spot - there were signs of that on the plant when you asked your first ID question regarding it, so I imagine it was there when you bought it. The other thing I noticed was some leaves appeared eaten, so its worth inspecting the plant thoroughly, preferably with a magnifying glass, to see if you find ...


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Came here to add to this answer - I got the exact same brown spots on my Carolina Reaper plant and I am not convinced it's a pest. I grew two of them from seed along with around two dozen of other chilli varieties. They all have been growing very close to each other and only the Carolina Reaper is showing these spots. I have been looking very carefully ...


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