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9

You don't need any fertiliser at all to start with - the clue is in the word 'starter'. You're only meant to germinate the seeds, then wait till they have 2/3 sets of leaves (one cotyledon pair and one true leaves), at which point you move them into individual pots containing probably seed and cutting compost - then move them up into potting compost in ...


8

In many cases, it is simply for convenience. However; there are some plants which do not tolerate transplanting. Therefore, to start seeds indoors to get a head start and/ or maximize their strong stocks, people use peat pots so they can transfer them outdoors without transplantation. One noted example of an intolerant plant is corn.


4

Peat has been extensively used for years as a soil amendment or an ingredient in the mix for potting composts. Nutrient level is low to non existent, but because it holds onto water, it can also retain nutrients which are present in the potting mix or garden soil. It has an acid ph, and there's usually a high proportion of peat in potting mixes for acid ...


4

In the American English version of the book, it is clear that the recommended mix is 1/3 of mixed, composted materials. That includes things like mushroom compost, composted cow manure, composted poultry manure, and composted kitchen scraps. If this is similar to what you would find in a bag of compost in the UK, and if those bags are indeed 1/2 peat, I ...


4

I don't know what size peat pellets you're using, but if they're the small square ones, you should pull out one of the seedlings from each now, or pot them on into something else once they've got their first pair of true leaves. Those tiny pots (around 40mm) won't have enough room for two tomato seedlings to develop proper roots, so its not wise to leave ...


3

Generally, one will cut off the unwanted seedlings once at least one of the seedlings in the group has 2-3 real leaves showing. If there is a good reason to cut the culls off before that (for example, some of the seedlings are much weaker than the others, or diseased or damaged or so many have sprouted in the same cell that there is no room to grow) then go ...


2

You can of course leave any organic medium out of your soil mix! This is how lots of vegetables etc. are grown professionally, even many bonsais. However, you will have to modify your fertilizing and watering scheme accordingly: Water thouroughly, typically daily. Do not just wet the substrate, but have the water flow right through the pot. This will also ...


2

If what you're potting into the mix you mention is a Rabbit's Foot fern, that is the correct potting mix for it, because these ferns prefer a low soil mixture. I don't know what other references you've been looking at, but presumably, these refer to other uses or to other plants which will not appreciate such a low soil mixture https://www.gardeningknowhow....


1

For your lemons and strawberries this will probably do (use pots with drainage holes though), but for cacti it is advisable to use something else (with better drainage capacity, and less peat). You can buy special cactus potting soil (e.g., Pokon), it contains more sand or gravel of some kind to encourage proper drainage. You can also make your own cactus ...


1

Yes, you can root basil in regular garden potting soil, either rich soil from the garden or peat based mixes. The only difference really is that you don't get the feedback of being able to see the roots forming. To root in soil you do the same process as in water, so since normally it is very easy to root basil cuttings in water, the first thing is to figure ...


1

I have a similar story - I saw a recommendation online that talked about putting some peat mix in paper pulp egg cartons, sowing seeds in them and then planting out the separated egg cups with soil and growing seedlings intact into the soil. Only about half of mine survived. The fails were pulled out of the ground by birds and other critters wanting to see ...


1

It can absorb a lot of water and release it as it is needed. But you are right, it has not much nutrients, and pure peat is also very acid.


1

Peat pots make quick work of starting seeds. The beauty of using peat pots is that transplanting the seeds into the garden becomes a snap. The pot breaks down and becomes part of the soil. There is no packaging to throw away and no plastic to recycle.


1

They're used for starting seeds, and not for putting plants into. Then once the seed has sprouted and grown a bit, you can then transplant the whole thing into soil without disturbing the new roots. There is also no competition from other seeds that you would get if you put the seeds directly into the ground. The new roots will also grow right through the ...


1

I agree with michelle...are you adding ANY soil to your mix? It sounds as if it is all compost or organic matter! Plants HAVE TO HAVE SOIL! And I gotta say NO WAY DO YOU USE GARDEN SOIL in pots/bags. Garden soil is a very large ecosystem. It is not perfectly mixed but in the larger picture it is better able to provide balance. There is NO WAY to shovel ...


1

The first leaves of the seedlings (not the true leaves) contain nourishment for the plant. I suppose that's one reason people say not to fertilize seedlings. Another reason is likely that seedlings may not be strong enough to take the nitrogen from most fertilizers, which can burn the leaves (and in the case of seedlings, kill them more easily). However, not ...


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