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12

This is Fire Blight, a bacterial infection commonly spread by bees and other pollinators. Hence the infection usually starts at the blossoms. It typically extends into the branches and twigs, but is often localized. It can, however spread into the tree (especially a weakened tree). Death is inevitable if the infection reaches the roots. Pears are ...


11

A picture would be nice. If the trees are young, they may not yet have an extensive enough root system and canopy to support all the fruit so you end up with lots of small fruit rather then larger specimens. And do you want growth wasted when they drop prematurely as the tree sheds those it can't support? Another reason is that low lying branches laden with ...


8

As well as the issue of small-sized fruit, another consequence of letting a tree over-crop by not thinning is that the tree may start a cycle of only producing a good crop once every two years. This problem affects apples and pears more than other tree fruits. Some varieties are more prone to "biennial bearing" than others, but curing it is difficult - ...


8

What "full size" IS depends on what you do or don't do (and/or what "June-drop" does or not do for you.) More smaller fruit - don't thin. Less larger fruit - do thin. From the tree's point of view the smallest, seediest fruit that will still be considered edible by some animal who will transport the seeds elsewhere is "big enough." If you thin the fruit, ...


7

I'm afraid its Pear Rust, sometimes called European Pear Rust - its one of the gymnangosporangium rusts, and as such, needs two different plant species to complete its life cycle, in this case, Pear trees and Juniper plants. If you have a Juniper in your garden, it might be worth removing it, but usually, this plant is widely planted and if your neighbours ...


6

Fire blight is a common disease of many fruit bearing trees. As the name implies branches that are infected have dark "burn" marks on them. This reference describes the disease and symptoms as: In spring, branch and trunk canker symptoms can appear as soon as trees begin active growth. The first sign is a watery, light tan bacterial ooze that exudes ...


5

I would guess winter freezes killed the branches and that the live parts of your tree will live without the problem progressing, per se. This sort of thing is fairly common with fruit trees, from what I've seen. Insects and/or nutritional issues may also have contributed. It could have been caused by fire blight from last year, but your tree doesn't look ...


5

It is a good thing to have mixed fruit trees. I hope they are not too close together. The best fertilizer is nature. But nature needs time to do its work. You should store leaves and mulched grass beneath your trees, and you shall see a lot of little beasts doing the fertilizing work for you. Of course some of them will take their share of the fruits, but ...


5

I know some folks will say this idea hurts trees because it may limit rainwater reaching the healthy roots but trust me, it works and I have not lost a tree yet! Purchase some thin sheet aluminum. Mine came in a roll about 14" wide, not sure of the mil thickness but it probably was used for roofing. Cut a piece that is about twice the diameter of the tree. ...


5

Effective use of weedkiller would stop the suckers by killing the parent tree - so unless your desired solution to suckering is to remove the tree, stop doing that. Excessive suckering is often a sign of being planted at the wrong depth with respect to a graft union. That is not really correctable (AFAIK) on an established mature tree. Just keep cutting ...


4

Apples and pears are very similar, so that makes this answer much simpler. You want a tree with moderated growth, because otherwise you end up with huge amounts of growth and very little fruit. You have a certain amount of space. A standard tree may fill the space quickly, but then it will put out dozens of long watersprouts all over each year, and won't ...


4

How young? I would remove all fruit if the tree is in its first or second year, because it forces the tree to use all of its energy getting established instead of producing fruit. edit: if you have a multi-way tree, often you will find that one or two of the grafts grow much faster than some of the others. you should prune the fast growing grafts ...


4

With pears (and apples) you need to distinguish two dates ripe for picking ripe for eating Those dates may be the same or - especially for breeds for storage - weeks apart. Also at least here in Germany there are early and late cultivars that are picked between late July / early August and the end of October /early November (with bloom in April and May), ...


4

One additional point to expand on Ecnerwal's detailed answer it that you should try to tear the suckers off rather than cut them. By doing this you also remove all the dormant basal sprouts that cluster at the site where the sucker emerges from the trunk. Also, a good rule with pruning of any sort is to observe the season. If you prune when the plant is ...


4

There is a good chance you have Codling Moth infestation. There are pesticides that can help but you can also likely fight back without chemicals by removing much of the fruit early in the year so that none of the pears are touching each other on the tree and by picking up and disposing (offsite) of any fallen fruit ASAP. Also dispose far away from your ...


4

Aha, thanks for the picture, makes all the difference. Here is a link to Pear Rust Gall; please take a look at the information provided and see how it compares. There are other pages addressing the same issue on pears that may also help narrow it down. Are you in the UK? The fix for this is to prevent spores from reaching the pear tree. The alternate host ...


4

These sound like trees trained as espaliers, though espaliers usually have several horizontal "layers" to get more fruit with a restricted height so that it can all be picked from ground level. For good results you need to choose suitable varieties, grafted onto suitable root stocks. Note this is not an "instant gratification" technique and it will take a ...


3

Impossible to be definite about when they're ready, it varies according to environmental conditions as much as variety of pear. However, there is one thing you do need to know - European pears should be picked when they are mature, but not when they appear 'ripe'. They ripen from the inside out, so what looks like an unripe pear is ripening, and by the time ...


3

There's not much to add to all the other answers, except to say that thinning also allows sunlight and air to reach more of the fruit, aiding good ripening/sweetening, and considerably lowers the risk of brown rot occurring from fruits touching each other if the weather is very wet. Younger trees producing heavy crops may be set back and not grow so well (as ...


3

Our old Bartlett pear would occasionally bloom in the fall, here in zone 6b. It is generally caused by weather conditions tricking the mature dormant buds (for next season's growth) into breaking dormancy in the fall. Usually this doesn't hurt the tree health-wise, and can help you with fruit thinning the following year. The time in fall that they sometimes ...


3

It's not healthy, but I've seen it be successful (pollarding also) on fireblight infested pear trees, so long as you cut above the graft (most trees, not yours). Otherwise you get rootstock fruit. keep in mind that this isn't always successful and may kill the tree. It is best performed in early spring.


3

I would do one of two things. One, is to call a professional to come in and do major adjustments. This would make it quick and hopefully make sure it's done right. I'd personally choose option 2 and take the DIY root :)). Here is a link to a page I was actually looking at just now from the Clemson College of SC's Home and Garden Info Center: http://www....


3

How should you go about pruning the pear tree so as not to cause permanent damage? Basically, you only want to cut limbs small enough to heal over in one season, if possible. This will vary by the age, rootstock, and overall vigor of your particular tree. Pear trees show very strong apical dominance, and will naturally grow rather tall and narrow, not the ...


2

Check the pH of the soil. Concrete can add too much lime and make the soil too alkaline for your tree. Tree roots are primarily the top 6" of soil so depth isn't a problem unless the concrete is stopping drainage. I don't advocate peat moss but the use of peat moss probably brought the pH down to a level the tree needed. Try to never plant plants in a ...


2

Remove the suckers. Remove the dead wood You can check by bending the tips. If they flex easily, it's still live. You can also scrape the bark. If you find it green, that part is live. If bark flakes off, it's dead. Step back. Remove any branches that cross. Remove any branches other than the leader that run mostly straight up. Cut the leader off at ...


2

I hate to go against the content of the comments from our other contributors but this tree is a write-off. It looks like you are in a small suburban garden where you do not have space for trees that are not going to look nice or produce for many years. The break is above any graft point so it will rebud with fruit bearing growth but you will have lost a ...


2

Karen, suckering on ornamental flowering Pear is a common problem that we have on the nursery as well. We have been working on training our Tree pruners to be a little less professional when suckering by tearing away the suckers rather than pruning away. Unfortunately there is no simple way to overcome this.But I can tell you from my own experience in my ...


2

That brown 'coating' is called russeting. The cultivar is hard, because of all the varieties that have russetting. The shape looks a lot like Bosc (known for the shape and russeting).


1

According to locals in Julian, 20 Aug to the 1 Sept. is normal. From Bamboo's link: The best way to tell if a pear is ready to harvest is by taking the fruit in your hand and tilting it horizontally. The mature fruit will easily come away from the branch at this angle (as opposed to its natural vertical hanging position). If it is not yet ready ...


1

Ours are at least 70 years old and here in the mid-south, they generally start ripening in late August.


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