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14

I have been using salt to control my neighbor's bamboo for 5 years now. He planted a 200 foot line of bamboo with no intention of controlling it. I had to trench my own yard for 200+ feet and lay in a barrier 3 feet off the property line. (After I removed over 100 feet of roots destroying my yard). Then to keep the plants from filling in from the barrier ...


13

A: Craigslist, curb alert, free pavers. B: By the side of the road, with a sign "free pavers". To really make them move, C: by the side of the road, a sign, "pavers, $2 each" (don't expect the $2, but you could get lucky, and the folks that think they are stealing them might be more eager than the ones that are taking them for free.) Contact your local ...


6

Creeping thyme - hardy to at least USDA zone 4, thins a bit in light shade, tolerates heat very well, flowers in summer and attractive to bees, maintenance limited to ripping it out when it gets too big. Never had a problem with bees but it will self seed. Not suitable for culinary use. Irish moss - hardy to at least USDA zone 4, tolerates shade, small white ...


6

Sell them on Craig's list or Ebay!! Those things are valuable. Do you have any neighbors with drainage issues, land slides in their back yards? Find a RESTORE type outfit nearby. They'll come and do all the work (as they should)and take them away. Put an ad up in your neighborhood hardware/lumber yard. Don't forget to go TALK to the manager(s) of the ...


6

This is the rare place where a weed torch/flame weeder actually makes sense - though plain old hot water will work as well - and neither will attack your pavers the way that acids will (unless you go nuts with the weed torch - so don't go nuts with it - weeds do not need to be burnt to a crisp to kill them.) If you happen to own a steamer (that puts it out ...


5

Try horticultural vinegar. It is a much stronger acid than regular store bought vinegar. You can buy it online. Spray the weeds liberally in the middle of a hot sunny day. Hot direct sun is the most important thing when using horticultural vinegar. I'm not sure why stormy is suggesting glyphosphate herbicide when you said you don't want to use bad ...


5

I used to have a lot of weeds in my brick driveway and the graveled border around my house. I used to spend a fortune every year treating this with general high street brands. I then discovered using cooking salt as a weed killer. I spread it around neat 3 times a year (spring, summer,and autumn) which is much quicker than using a spray bottle amazingly ...


4

Perhaps pre-paving prevention is (or should be) the best plan in the first place. Speaking from experience, about my own weedy paving problem (which has occurred after a lot of hard work paving a large area a few years ago), a base-mix of dry sand and cement would have done a lot to prevent all the weed-seeds in the soil growing into problem weeds. A half ...


4

All the ones recommended already, plus Campanula portenschlagiana (previously Campanula muralis, sometimes still sold under that name). Note, NOT Campanula carpatica or any of the hundreds of other varieties you're likely to find available. C. portenschlagiana is a very neat grower, remains evergreen, tolerates some shade - the fact it'll be in full light ...


3

It is not worth modifying the pavers as the root(s) will continue to grow and lift. I can't plant anything in my yard without cutting roots, usually the size of you photo or smaller. I recently (one year ago) cut 2" and 4" roots about 3 ft. from an oak and it did not bother the tree. I have cut 4" roots from pines a few times , the reason I avoid it is that ...


3

I have not had problems with my pavers because they were installed well with almost no gaps (one of the few things a previous owner did right), however white vinegar works as well as other chemicals in other places in my yard (cracks in concrete). Use an old spray bottle to apply it. Since weeds in between pavers do not come from below, but from tiny ...


3

If you've got pavers, that suggests block paving (also known originally as paviours), the brick shaped paving often used on driveways and patios, rather than paving slabs - these are never pointed in between. They're closely laid, but with enough room for sand to be forced down the gaps by using a wacker plate machine. Over time, inevitably, the sand can ...


3

I've tried the polymeric sand but it doesn't work. Ants dig through and weeds pop up. Don't spend your money. Spray with vinegar, but only when the sun is shining, not when it's cloudy.


2

The base rock and leveling sand should not be a problem. The photo below shows crape myrtles (which is what I believe is pictured in your photo) planted in a compacted bed of small crushed gravel and natural fines (rough sand) soon after planting. These trees have been in place for almost 4 years now, and they are thriving. With a structural base like that ...


2

Boxwoods will grow best if they are not being brushed past constantly while trying to grow. The safest minimum planting distance will be centered in the middle of the bed. This will leave a 3" buffer space at the base of the mature plant on both sides. Green Tower boxwoods do not have a huge root system, but to be on the safe side, you can take a square ...


2

The Green Tower Boxwood sounds like a good choice. Make sure that there isn't a layer of concrete below the soil. Lots of contractors dump concrete out close to projects and beside a stairwell I'd be suspicious (if I am reading you correctly.) You need to double dig that soil anyway...if there is concrete and it is blocking the drainage I'd try punching ...


2

[These pavers have spaces between individual pavers? One thing you might do is redo the entire patio floor so there are no spaces. Need to send a picture of paver type and paver bed; how deep is the sand beneath, the gravel beneath that? This will be almost the same amount of work that you are considering pulling the weeds. If there is no proper bed I ...


2

Consider pulling out select tiles and replace them with plants. You can pull out a large section and insert some type of shrub or shade inducing plant to help with the heat. For the rest you could remove the pieces in a checker board fashion and replace it with ground covers such as the Thyme or oregano. That would yield a better softer surface for play. You ...


2

Assuming that the area paved was more than just a few feet, and that the company who did the installation installed pavers and not flagstones, then this is NOT normal. The last thing the company should have done on that job was to spread polymeric sand, compact it into the pavers, and then lightly water it. This would have turned the sand into a solid, ...


2

I think you are worrying about nothing here. Concrete and clay bricks are essentially rock. They don't have any "chemical additives" in them. In fact concrete is alkaline, not acid. If it does have any (small) effect on the soil chemistry, it will be beneficial in the same way as using agricultural lime. Calcium levels in soil are gradually depleted ...


1

It depends on your zone and climate. Where you have sustained periods of hot weather pavers and flag stone heat up, particularly so if they are dark in colour. The pavers radiate that heat and make that area hotter. Grass, shrubs and trees make it cooler by letting water vapour out of their leaves and stems. You can try this yourself any hot afternoon of ...


1

In Australia I find pavers very well for preserving soil moisture - provided there isn't concrete between them.


1

The problem I see as the biggest problem mainly because I am a barefoot nut. Ugh, exposed aggregate is horrible. There is no way to change that other than purchasing a different patio tile; Roman Cobble, concrete, smooth finish, 2" thick by 7" X 9". Depending on the condition of your patio bed would be pretty easy to change out and enlarge. Gotta have ...


1

If you cut or chisel the roots you damage the tree. This close to the tree trunk will cause die back. Raising the soil around the tree will also cause die back unless it's done slowly over a few years. If the health of the tree is a priority a deck raised on a 2" x 4"'s sitting on a block or slabs will provide a level surface and allow the oxygen that the ...


1

From what I have been reading of your question, you do have a bit of a drainage problem on your site. An immediate fix would be a 'dry well' off to the side of your lawn. Dig a big hole; 2 to 3 feet deep and 6 to 8 feet in diameter. LIne it with landscape fabric, dump in river rock, drain rock, cobble they are all the same thing to fill the hole, cover with ...


1

A couple of options: You could use an herbicide like roundup. I recommend saving that as a last resort. You could use a propane flame to burn the plants. This may require multiple applications, but is nearly as effective as herbicide without chemical residue. If you are persistent in pulling out the small shoots of the plants then they will eventually die ...


1

The plant in the picture appears to be woody at the base, which strongly suggests its a shrub or tree. In looks vaguely similar to Buddleia, but it doesn't have enough growth to be sure. Whatever it is, you won't get the roots of that out, since its had time to form wood at the base. In the UK, I'd cut it down level with the paving, then drill into the ...


1

You are probably right, the reason those pavers 'sunk' was because of a poorly made paver bed. Just take those pavers up...store them, they are worth putting somewhere else or making paths out of them. I would get rid of all growing stuff, regrade so that that entire area has at the very least 2% grade AWAY from your foundation. How high is the back of ...


1

Once they're laid, it's too late. But when the paving is being laid, ask the fitters to put a thin layer of sand/cement mix on the top of the sharp sand underneath. It doesn't completely stop weeds between the pavers, but it greatly reduces their ability to send down roots and grow bigger.


1

This is a low-effort solution I've used on some areas successfully (in southern England), and have been meaning to try on larger areas after being disappointed with weedkiller and unwilling to use it at the moment. I mainly use a wire brush with a long handle and/or a shaped scraper blade; you'd need to use those to finish the job but dead weeds should be ...


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