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6

Stone is available from building and construction stores, stone suppliers, direct from the quarry and, occasionally from construction sites when you have permission. Although most of the planet is made of stone there is only a small fraction that is useful as building material for steps and walls and patios. Stone that is all about the same thickness is the ...


5

You really need to find a specialist nursery that supplies large plants in large pots - I'm in the UK and we do have those here. You haven't said what USDA zone you're in, but I can see that New England doesn't get any higher than zone 7a,and that is an important factor. Many trees which are hardy in the ground are not so hardy when in pots, Laurus nobilis (...


5

I'm guessing that the patio is quite old ( > 10 years). A concrete border is an effective way of preventing patio stones from drifting away from each other. Other techniques are used by interlock companies today. Some of these are: it's all in the base. With cold winters you can get frost heave which warp the alignment of the bricks that you have. To ...


4

Not really, if water is pooling in the area, or it remains damp and sunless, particularly in our wet winters. On roof slates or walls, the addition of a copper strip at the top, so that any water running down contains a minute amount of copper, inhibits algal growth or stops it altogether, but that's not going to be effective in the area you describe. I'm ...


3

This phenomenon may be explained by the presence of moles in your garden. I am no expert on the lives of moles, but I have a similar situation around my house. They seem to prefer to dig soil up around fixed structures, such as walls, for some reason. When I first moved here, I would dig the soil back with a shovel or water the raised sections every time I ...


3

The best pot to get are the sand-cast concrete. Be sure to fill the entire pot with good potting soil. Look for soil that has mychorrizae and bacteria added. Mix into the soil Osmocote extended release fertilizer. No rock or gravel in the bottom as that actually causes poor drainage. You'll need 'pot feet' to get the bottom of the pot off the patio and ...


3

I am not big on grass in areas where people will sit. There are many other plants which will do a better job of being green and requiring little or no maintenance. two inches of soil is a bit thin for grass. You will find the slabs radiate heat absorbed during the day and dry out the soil. You will end up having to irrigate during the summer and may see ...


3

I think the most effective way would be to not fill it at all. How about a raised deck on concrete sono tubes if you are in a freeze are or deck feet in warmer climates? If you change the grade you must ensure that any water runoff including downspout (gutter) water has someplace to go away from your house. Raising the grade is a lot of work. To fill the ...


2

The base rock and leveling sand should not be a problem. The photo below shows crape myrtles (which is what I believe is pictured in your photo) planted in a compacted bed of small crushed gravel and natural fines (rough sand) soon after planting. These trees have been in place for almost 4 years now, and they are thriving. With a structural base like that ...


2

Here are some trees that will grow well in large planters given the right care: Canadian Hemlock, Tsuga canadensis Positives: One of the only shady evergreens that will be winter hardy in a pot in New england Is hardy to USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 °C (-40 °F) Year-round visual interest Will take a heavy snow load Grows fast low maintenance Negatives: Drops ...


2

The water will seep down between the pavers and make it's way below to the rocks, going into the soil below as the soil can absorb. If your water table is so high, or your soil is regularly over saturated that deeply, you might have issues. You should be building the whole thing with a slight pitch away from the building. This should prevent water from ...


1

I agree, a deck will not help the value of your home. A patio would. Even better is to make the patio the same level as the floor in your home. We used ground up concrete compacted, then 5/8 minus compacted 4" and then builder's sand 2" as the paver base. No concrete, no space between pavers. These are called CMU walls, planters (concrete modular ...


1

That Idiot, grins! I would NOT do grass. Wooly thyme would be my choice! Greyish, no maintenance...keep the size of seams between flagstones as CONSTANT as you can. DO NOT cut flagstone to fit. Fit the flagstone as best you can. You should have 3-4" of compacted gravel with at least 1" of mason sand compacted on top before placing flagstone. Place ...


1

Not really, but you can use a product specifically designed for use on hard surfaces such as Patio Magic, which does have some residual deterrent effect. Use as instructed on the container. I imagine your paving is in a fairly shady area, which encourages moss and the like, particularly through winter when the air is damp. You'll likely have to use the ...


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