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8

Parsley is an umbellifer and a biennial. This says that the flowers are produced in umbrella-like clusters and its growth takes two years to complete; in the first year it focuses on growing a solid tap root, and in the second sends up a flowering stalk, flowers, and sets seed. I have much experience growing caraway, also a biennial umbellifer, for seed in ...


5

Looks like a little wind. It won't affect the quality for culinary use, but possibly aesthetically as a garnish. Looks like Italian parsley, so not generally used as a garnish anyway. The plant looks quite healthy otherwise, so I wouldn't worry about it, but for next time, keep in mind that leaf tips on the outermost leaves are the most liable to sustain ...


4

Rosemary looks over watered, you are correct that the roots may have some rot. They are great at being "left alone". If you are leaving them alone, sometimes the use of gardening soil instead or potting soil OR packing the soil too tightly can cause the pot to store too much water. IF you used potting soil, consider replanting it and packing the soil a tad ...


4

Answer to part one of your question: Use the sniff test. Cilantro and parsley each have a distinct smell. You may want to take a bit and crush it a bit to release more aroma.


4

You have two problems that are at play here, actually aggravating each other. First, etiolation - lack of light and the side effects. We discussed this before in your other question. Second, those seedlings are too many, too close together. This means that they will complete for the resources like water, light and especially space. A factor that puts ...


4

Parsley, like many garden vegetable, are biennial plants, so one year they will produce the green and the second year they will produce flowers and seed (usually greens in second year are not so tasty). So, stop cutting parsley in fall, and lets it to feel winter (but not so much, I think it is good to shelter it, so you can still harvest the plant to be ...


3

It is very difficult to see, since the photo is a bit blurry, but this looks to me like parsley. If an ID is important to you at this point, you can check the seeds. Parsley seeds are small and kind of football-shaped. Cilantro seeds are a bit larger and completely round. Either way, you will definitely need to start with a new plant. Once parsley and ...


2

Answer to part two: Once either parsley or coriander/chilantro has gone to seed there is no real further kitchen use "in it". Unless you plan to harvest coriander seeds, of ourse, but the "green bits" are done. Cilantro is an annual, parsley a biennial plant, once they've developed seeds, the plant dies. So no matter what the sniff test says with regard to ...


2

My parsley goes like this after it has had an attack of greenfly, probably because they suck the sap out of the plant. I usually treat it with a biological spray, cut off the affected leaves and stems and discard them, and the plant recovers with rest. (Don’t use it for eating during this period). Sometimes the greenfly are so small they don’t notice until ...


1

This looks a lot like powdery mildew. This is what powdery mildew looks like: There are many options for treatment. To be honest though, I don't know if it is worth the trouble. If the parsley was meant for consumption, I'd throw it away. Otherwise I'd remove the infected leaves and isolate the plant and start treatment to prevent further spread. I'd start ...


1

Not sure what it is - an open flower would help with ID. It looks vaguely like Catharansus, but might not be. If it's got a good root system, you can transfer it to a small pot with fresh potting soil, but don't put it outside, keep it inside for a few days,then harden it off over a week or so by leaving it outside in the middle of the day, extending the ...


1

They may not be accustomed to sunlight, so that might have caused a problem, but the main issue is probably lack of water. Water when the surface of the soil feels just about dry to the touch, water well, allow to drain down freely. Check them daily to see if they need water, especially if the weather is hot and sunny, when they might need watering twice a ...


1

It needs to root into the soil and it needs more water - you really do need to find a pot with drainage holes and transfer it to that, using fresh potting soil to plant it into,then give it a good soak, let it drain down, and after that,keep it watered when the surface of the soil feels dry to the touch. Empty out any outer tray or pot 30 minutes after ...


1

It's certainly a heavy and probably longstanding infestation of some type of whitefly by the looks of it, but that's quite unusual on plants growing outdoors which aren't brassicas in the UK and Ireland. If its whitefly,they usually fly up in the air when you wave your hand near the plant - these insects don't look exactly like typical whitefly either, but I ...


1

I am not expert but I just wanted to write. Don't you need like 4-5 hours sunlight for parsley? I would water more often. I wouldn't wait until it dries. Keep the soil lightly moist and be sure to grow it near a sunny window. Maybe once a month feed the plants.


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