9

Looks like a heavy whitefly aphid infestation - they're usually underneath the leaves and suck the sap within, causing the leaf to shrivel and die. You can't treat with pesticide because it's an edible plant, so your only recourse is something like neem or insecticidal soap spray, I'm afraid. Further information on how to deal with whitefly on edible plants ...


8

Alstonia scholaris (L.) R. Br. is a very beautiful ornamental tree, which is commonly known as pagoda tree because of its pagoda like growing habit. It is commonly infected by the Homopteran, Pauropsylla tuberculata Crawf which leads to unsightly gall formation on the leaves as pictured. The gall is the leaf response to the infection by the parasite which ...


7

You only need to be worried about some pathogenic e coli that can be incorporated into plant tissues. And generally these are not found in aquatic environments. The other bacteria, viruses and amoebae can be washed off. In all cases, all are destroyed in cooking. People use fish ( unsure about turtles ) in aquaponics systems where the waste water is ...


4

Cedar-Apple Rust This National Gardening Association report has good information about the problem. This is from part of that report. The first symptoms on apples are pale yellow spots on the upper surfaces of the leaves and on developing fruits in mid to late spring. The spots gradually get bigger and turn orange or red, and you may see black dots in the ...


4

I agree, leaf galls. Looks like a Rhododendron regardless, @Atul, need you to take a razor blade and slice through a 'gall' to see if the insect is still there. Take a picture. I would right now cut that infected branch off. This is usually not a death sentence! But before 'trying' any treatment we need to know what that insect is...or virus or bacteria but ...


4

It's hard to tell from the picture, but I think that may be a tree of heaven that sprouted there. If that's the case if you just cut it to the ground it will come back over and over again but if you keep cutting it back it will eventually die. Like stormy suggested, that's what I would do. If you don't want the hassle, I think that painting the freshly ...


4

The transparent wormlike things may well be fruit fly larvae - the yellow ones not sure what they are, but I'm willing to bet they came in on the fennel you tried to transplant into the same soil in the pot. Fruit flies like damp soil, so if you've been overwatering, that would explain their presence; the flies may originally have been attracted by fruit ...


4

Chinese Clematis (Clematis orientalis) only wraps itself around other plants. It doesn't suck their juices. However, it can be harmful to the plants it climbs over. It will compete with them for sunlight, much like if you covered them with cloth. Where the clematis stem wraps around the other plant stem, the other stem won't be able to grow any larger, just ...


3

Looks to be a slime mold. It won't hurt any of the plants (it's feeding on the mulch).


3

I am not sure, I am not from that area. But my two cents are Indian pipe (Monotropa uniflora), or some related species. They are indeed parasitic, they have no chlorophyll.


3

That depends on if you eat vegetables raw, and how paranoid you are. Properly cooked veg should not be a problem. If you are paranoid, just don't put pond water on root vegetables, or cook them well. Turtles can also carry salmonella.


3

I am going to say more or less the same thing. Given the mint died and these guys appeared, they can't be good, even if they are harmless. We will need either an entomologist or someone specialized in agriculture to say exactly what worms they are. Posting on the Biology Stackexchange with close up shots might help. In the meanwhile, I'd dump the soil. If ...


3

In addition to the information here Found on a Red Cedar. What is it?, if you have any Red Cedar (Juniper) trees on your property, check them over - if you see evidence of this infection on them (and you will) clip out the affected parts now, as it says in the answer. There is no other treatment available. Unfortunately, if there are other Red Cedars in the ...


3

The leaf damage you are seeing is almost certainly thrips feeding damage, though it does not look much like the first reference here. For your next plant, you may want to replace the soil and clean the pot well (thrips can survive in soil). These may provide some places to start looking for a solution that will work for you. http://mtvernon.wsu.edu/...


2

You've got major insect infestations and a beat up plant. I would sadly get rid of that plant and the soil. Disinfect the pot with a bit of bleach. Get another basil plant and use only potting soil. A little Osmocote I would try THAI BASIL. Knock you down dead with the flavor and smell! I dried mine filling 3 gallon size ziplocs last season. ...


2

Yes its rust, best thing to do is remove the tree entirely including the stump as it will reshoot from the base and those bits will be infected too- the fungus is systemic and has infected every part of the tree, burn all affected parts, don't compost or bury any bit too, plus its often another plant is also infected too, so do a hunt around your garden and ...


2

These seem to be Scale insects, you see the scale which protect the insects inside them. They eats the sap. If they are active, usually you find ants nearby, taking part of the sap. There are many types of such insects, with a lot of colours. These are very large, compared what I usually see. Insecticides which enter to sap helps. You can remove them and ...


2

The small tree is a species of Ilex (Holly). There are many different species of holly. Not all have thorns. Not all are evergreen. Most are quite vigorous taking advantage of any opening to start to grow, especially around fertile soil. Ilex aquifolium, AKA English Holly is very invasive in many part of the North America. Bird eat the berries and ...


2

This type of growth is called witch's broom. It can be caused by a parasitic plant like mistletoe, but what you have doesn't look like mistletoe. It looks more like misshapen growth of the original plant. Possible causes include a wide variety of plant diseases, physical damage, herbicide damage, or even a spontaneous mutation at that node of the plant. ...


1

They are Mealy bugs and yes, they are harmful to your plant. Mealy bugs are a type of soft scale insects. They feed by sucking the juice from plant leaves and stems. I have dealt with mealy bugs a lot on Marantas (Prayer plants, Calathea, Stomanthe, etc ...). They love to hide in the leaf sleeves that Prayer Plants have. A trick that I used to find them was ...


1

It looks to me as if your soil is unfit for cacti - far too much organic material. A cactus cannot cope with too many bacteria / fungi / etc, it does better sandy rubble soil with good drainage.


1

I'm not completely sure, but I think a soap water will get rid off them.


1

I would just take a pruning saw and chop the newcomer to the ground. If it starts to regrow just chop the new growth down. It will die from starvation and you won't have to worry about surgery! You need to create a plant less tree/shrub circle around your...lilac? Crepe Myrtle? Do at least a 3' radius circle.


1

An option, looking at the different members of the family, seem to suggest a southern green stink bug. Should it be handpicked remaining an open question.


1

Another possibility. Do you notice any tiny black flies (2-3 mm, a little smaller than fruit flies) around the plants? They could be sitting on the soil, leaves or window (if the plant's indoor). They're weak fliers, fluttering annoyingly about the plants, or you at night if your sitting by a lamp reading. If you have these tiny flies, the 'worms' in your ...


1

The wormlike things are most likely nematodes of some sort - whether they're friend or foe, I don't know - many are beneficial, some are parasitic on either insects or plants, but if your plant was healthy, they're unlikely to be a problem to your plant and are just a normal part of the soil population. No idea whether they originated from another country or ...


1

Educated guess: They won't survive long out of their natural (aquarium) environment. They shouldn't pose any issue whatsoever. I'm not the aquarium expert, but as quite a bit of research didn't bring up anything about these nematodes even occurring out of their natural environment. Basically, I wouldn't worry about it.


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