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3

This palm has a well established colony of mealy bug. Using a magnifying glass will show them better as they hide in a white powdery layer of wax. You can try controlling them with a mix of 5 ml of dish soap to one liter of water. Dip a cloth in the solution and wipe all surfaces of the plant. Do this three times every five to seven days to catch the eggs ...


3

Those brown bumps are scale insects, and yes they can spread to other plants as well. You can try to wipe 'em off with a wet cloth, or you can use poison from the store. It is hard to get rid of them completely, but keeping it under control by wiping them off should give your plant a bit of time to recover. You might want to learn more about scale ...


2

Hmmm nice tree. Looks like a fan palm. Any recommendation on action would really only be fair in a professional consultation but I guess there is no problem making a few observations: looks like it is firmly rooted in the centre and on three sides at least, with the weaker side towards the house so that is good because the good roots are holding it up away ...


2

I looks like mostly moss with small bits of light green lichen. I doubt either will harm the tree.


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The seller of my areca palm says it is black fungus and it won't kill the areca palm. However, it is spreading all over the stems. Here is photo. I cleaned some off already with damp cotton ball.


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It appears to be Dracaena Marginata. Here is a pretty good web page describing care. Highlights from the article: Make sure container is well-drained. Use a potting soil with a loamy soil (a mixture of silt, sand, and clay), along with some peat. Like all Dracaenas, the marginata flourishes in a humid atmosphere. Mist the leaves occasionally, and keep the ...


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I find that shallow watering causes browning at the tips. When watering I put mine in the sink and water them heavily, or you can actually sit the pot in some water until the soil is soaked.


1

It certainly seems to be a Foxtail palm; whether it will cope with the intense and constant sunlight is hard to predict. They cope very well with sun, and with salt laden breezes, but they do like humidity, so the lack of humidity might be an issue. It will certainly need watering at least once a day. I have reservations about the two in one pot being a ...


1

These are probably mealybugs. Mealybugs don't move about much, just suck the sap, weaken the plant, and leave a sticky mess. Your population looks quite high so time to treat is very soon. Alcohol will get them. I think I would start with a small piece of cloth dipped in isopropyl alcohol wrapped around the leaf, start at the base of the leaf and pull ...


1

No worries. Virtually no chance of it tipping. Most of the roots are deep down into the ground. Those you see on the surface aren't what's holding it upright. Feel free to remove the bits of wood -- they aren't helping to hold the tree up and I don't think you could hurt the tree by removing them. Many types of palms grow roots at or above the surface and ...


1

Leaves look like the Christmas palm, adonidia. When the spotted/mottled look disappears when the palm tree is older, it could be this one... http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Adonidia_dransfieldii


1

The whole plant appears to be an ex plant, dead in other words; if it was a palm, then its definitely dead, because the central growing point is also dead. However,I can't see if there's anything green at the top of the thicker, taller stem, but if there's no green anywhere, it would appear it needs a decent burial I'm afraid.


1

Had a similar experience with two Dracaena-sprouts I rooted over months in water and planted them then outside into new soil. The leaves wilted and got soft and decolorized. Guess the change with too much suddenly caused this, because only the "sun-side" was affected. But it recovered after I moved it to a more shadowy spot on the balcony. Guess ...


1

Definitely not a palm. Some kind of dracaena is a good guess. Moving a plant to a new location can stress the plant and cause symptoms like you're seeing. More sun, more breeze, higher temps -- almost any change can cause some plants to drop their leaves. Moving it in stages might keep it from reacting so badly. A week or two in each spot should do. If a ...


1

This plant was raised in a greenhouse. The temperature in that greenhouse was regulated for optimum plant health. Frequency and duration of watering was controlled for optimum plant health. The humidity was kept high for optimum plant health. Air circulation was controlled for optimum plant health. Then you bought the plant and brought it into your home. ...


1

Assuming the pot has drainage holes, it sounds as if you might not be watering adequately, so change your watering routine. When the surface of the soil feels just about dry to the touch, water well, with a litre or so of water, allow to drain down freely, and empty any outer tray or pot 30 minutes after watering, and again 30 minutes later if more has ...


1

If the central growing point is dead (not possible to see from your image) ,then its a goner; if you can see any green when you look down into the palm,especially in the centre, there's a chance it's still alive.


1

Yellowing leaves like this usually indicate water shortage - my own palm lives on an unheated landing, and it needs watering every week with about 1-2 litres of water, depending if its summer or winter, so if yours is in average room temperatures, 10 days seems too long. Water when the surface of the potting soil feels just about dry to the touch, water ...


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My money is on Areca (dypsis lutescens).


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Kentia palms do not need to be repotted very often as they are slow growing. The dying foliage could be caused by root damage when it was repotted. Unless your room temperatures are below 12 Deg C or 53 Deg F this would not harm the plant, just slow down it's growth. Humidity levels in houses are always quite low but plants do adapt so unless you can keep ...


1

That looks a bit like a scale infestation maybe? "Infected palms show tiny white spots on the undersides of the leaves. In time, the spots merge and the fronds look like they've been "whitewashed" or painted white. Some fronds may turn brown on top and still be white on the bottom, or they may turn brown entirely and curl up or even drop from the plant." ...


1

Definitely palm seedlings. No idea which palm. But I don't think it's Rhapis excelsa (lady finger palm) -- the ends of those leaves are typically square, not pointy. I've never grown them from seed, but when they put up a new shoot (they have multiple trunks), there are usually two short leaves on each frond, not one long thin one as in the photo. More ...


1

Looks like a Pygmy Date Palm (Phoenix roebelenii) to me. The leaves off the frond are relatively flat, and they are narrow and widely spaced. But the sharp spikes on the frond near the trunk are the biggest clue. I don't think it's Areca Palm (Dypsis lutescens, golden cane palm). Areca has more of a V shape to the leaves off the trunk. And the leaves are ...


1

Arecas grow fine in full sun in central and south Florida. Deeper green in the shade, more yellow in the sun. They will definitely outgrow those pots. Arecas planted in the ground will grow to 25 feet tall. They can easily have 10 to 50 trunks from the same plant. Each trunk can be 2 to 4 inches in diameter. At any given time the trunks will be of various ...


1

There are many different types of Chamaedorea. Some have single stems, but yours is one of the multi-stem varieties. Perhaps Chamaedorea seifrizii. All Chamaedorea like bright shade, growing naturally under a canopy of trees. The closer you can get to that, the happier your palm. Looks like it could use some nutrition. Maybe some palm fertilizer and ...


1

Not looking good... How wet was the soil? Plant looks dry and crispy in the photos. What was your watering routine? Spraying increases humidity, but is not enough to sustain a palm.


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Also, I would remove dead stems and brown fronds -- they are not only unsightly, but can provide a place for the critters to hide.


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My experience with those palms tells me those frond bases will not be ready to be removed for quite some time -- many months. That matting around the trunk is tough stuff! But just for looks, I personally would carefully trim the already cut fronds closer to the trunk using sharp pruning shears, about where the frond just starts to widen a bit. Not much ...


1

It just looks like they did not get to them. Best practice for trimming a palm tree is to remove all dead fronds/ leaves and any health fronds hanging below the horizon line. Anything above should stay. The ones in the above picture that have been done look fine.


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