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12

No, it is not. Those are nitrogen fixation nodules, similar to what alfalfa roots do. It is the result of symbiosis with a soil bacterium. With root rot the roots die and things get a little stinky. Pinch an affected root with a thumb and forefinger and tug - the epidermal tissues will slide right off the xylem or woody core.


9

Palm trees don't need trimming, so any fronds you remove are simply to improve the aesthetics. I like to cut away all the older, tattered palms just prior to spring for one simple reason — once warmer weather hits, the new growth will start pouring out from the top of the tree, and your palm will look fantastic and healthy despite their recent haircut....


7

Agree with Jim Young's answer, point given, but would add these are referred to as coralloid roots, and are common on Sago palm, image below https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cycas_revoluta_coralloid_roots.JPG


6

When you say pole saw I assume you mean a standard manual pole saw. If you're willing to spend a little money look into a chainsaw pole saw, that should tear through them in a hurry.


6

I've only seen this practice a few times in plants sold through the big-box stores. I believe they glue the gravel together so it doesn't fall out of the pot during shipping. The gravel is meant to keep the leaves off of the soil, and also to be decorative. Glued as it is, it offers no benefit to the plant at all and should be removed if you can. Sometimes ...


6

The top part is dead and the most likely cause is overwatering. This plant is officially known as Beaucarnea recurvata and is a plant for high light and dry conditions. From the picture it looks like there is no drainage in the pot which might contribute to the death of the foliage. There is still hope for this plant. Take some sharp pruning shears and ...


5

I've had every kind of pest and didn't want to trash my babies. The only thing that has worked for me is to take them, pot and all, if small or if large, out of the pot wash roots and submerge them completely under water. I have a small creek by my home so it's convenient. Tubs will work just the same: bury them completely under the water, make sure not ...


5

Is the plant healthy and growing? If so then leave it alone. You can top dress with a soil less mix or just add some on top. If you are potting it to a larger size then put some new soil in the bottom of the pot. Although tropical plant growers use soil less mix because it is consistent and weed free a clay or loam based mix will do just fine and may have ...


5

I have used high-quality Japanese saw blades to cut dry palm fronds (replacing them when they start getting dull). They cut through even dry fronds like butter (as long as the teeth are a good size: over 1/2 cm but less than 1, IIRC), and cut-on-pull is way easier when trying to balance on a ladder. The saw I used was hand-held, but I suppose you could ...


5

I am growing a date palm, Phoenix dactylifera as well. The seeds germinated readily from fresh dates about five years ago and it's about three feet (one meter) tall. I have also maintained similar members of the palm family inside atriums and offices. these plants are most happy in full sun. Even full sun in the tropics is just fine. I put mine outside ...


5

It looks like Phoenix canariensis to me, which is, indeed, commonly known as Canary Island Date Palm, although it doesn't produce dates - the one that does is Phoenix dactylifera. It does produce drupes, the flesh of which is edible, but thin and not worth eating. http://www.capeoasis.com/garden/html/phoenix_canariensis.html


5

The big white stains on the leaves could be a few things powdery mildew: unlikely given the hard waxy coat on the leaves. Wipe it off with a damp soapy cloth dried salts from overhead watering in the nursery. Were the stains there when you bought it? Wipe it off with a damp soapy cloth with a touch of vinegar and then another wipe off with water pesticide ...


5

This dendrochronologist says that some people extrapolate the age of palms from their leaf scars, and the time it takes to grow a leaf, but that the method is just a wild guess. But there is no other method that can be used intrinsic to the palm i.e. you can't count rings, and you can not carbon date.


5

The fruit is usually not consumed, but is occasionally used for medical purposes in some countries - it has a haemostatic effect, meaning it clots blood, and may be used to make a solution for use as a contraceptive. There are more efficient ways to do both those things, obviously; it doesn't sound like the fruits are eaten for their flavour. Its ...


5

As you're in East Anglia, UK, the plant growing at the base of your banana is Fatsia japonica rather than anything more exotic. This is quite the strangest planting combination I've seen - banana likes plenty of sun, whereas Fatsia does rather better in shadier, cooler conditions, but given the Fatsia's presence there, the fact that it is evergreen means it ...


5

First thing to do is correct your watering regime - little and often is not a good idea, it's better to let the plant dry out slightly between waterings, and water thoroughly when you do water. If the soil in the pot feels dry to the touch, give it a litre or two of water. If there's any water left in the outer pot after 30 minutes, empty that out so that ...


5

It's a Japanese Sago Palm, Cycas revoluta. It looks to be in fine condition so I would not prune it at all if you can avoid that. You will not kill it by removing a leaf but you should only remove the lower leaves; but that won't affect the overall size at all so it is rather unnecessary. See if you can find an alternate solution to the space issue.


4

I quickly gave up using a pruning pole saw, and now cut the dead fronds from my Washingtonias, and Phoenix palms, in minutes with cheap but efficient pruning shears which I bought from my local supermarket and have used for the last three years. You will, however, need a good ladder if your palms are 5 to 6 meters tall.


4

I always used a bow saw or pruning saw to trim my big and little palms. They will cut through anything. Not good for high stuff. Mine got so big I had to finally break down and hire someone to cut them for me. Not worth going to the hospital.


4

The only cause of dripping 'gummy' stuff is usually an infestation or bacterial infection. Pest infestation such as Palm Scale particularly can cause dripping of sticky stuff, but if the dripping is coming from the trunks and not the leaves, that's more likely to be a bacterial infection. If its that, you should be able to see evidence of the problem because ...


4

Pineapple palms typically refer to Phoenix canariensis and (typically) have a thick trimmed trunk with the overall appearance of a large pineapple. The Date fruit come from the Phoenix Dactylifera. There are a number of varieties with the fruit of the Medjool variety being the most desirable and the Deglet Noor variety is very common.These are commonly used ...


4

Cats don't like the smell of Pelargoniums, so adding a couple of pots of those around the base of the existing plants might help. Otherwise, try mothballs, but you need the old fashioned, napthalene type, that really smell strongly. The drawback with those is, the owner will be able to smell them too. Chili powder is often mentioned, but its not wise to use ...


4

Plants grow towards the light. This one needs to be turned on a regular basis. Just a little nudge every week will do. You could repot it straighter but that will still leave the large stem leaning. These plants bud out nicely from old growth. Why not cut the leaning stem off and let the new one take over? Sure, it will be shorter for a while but ...


3

If you live near a hydro grow shop they will carry a product called Mighty wash. It's like 20 bucks but if you spray every 3 days for 2 weeks it will clear it up, I had the same problem. And your plant will look green and heathy again. It's worth a try.


3

Many trees do this. This may be their natural habit. If you'd prefer a single trunk the thing to do is prune the shoots as soon as you're aware of them so that the roots aren't wasting too much energy on them instead of your main trunk.


3

It's likely its not Phoenix canariensis, but Phoenix dactylifera, which does produce suckers or offshoots in either its fourth year or tenth year, or both. They can be used as new plants, but need to be arising from the base, and left attached to the mother plant for 3-5 years, till they've formed a good root system of their own, at which point they can be ...


3

Whatever you do, don't cut off the top 3 inches of the palm - its equivalent to decapitation in an animal, and the plant will die. You can try removing anything that's dead though. This palm looks to be a Trachycarpus fortunei, and they are pretty hardy, but you haven't said and I'm not 100% certain without seeing more of it. What's interesting is the ...


3

It seems to me a sister of that, Jubahea Chilensis, syn. Jubaea spectabilis, Molinaea micrococos, Micrococos chilensis, Cocos chilensis. Although the palm trees in the ground generally are "trees" that do not require treatment, still require a minimum of maintenance. Cleaning, watering and fertilizing practices are essential for the harmonious ...


3

I recommend these steps: with a damp cloth or paper towel wipe down the stems and leaves. This will remove any pesticide residue and whatever is on the leaves and stems. do not spray with any pesticide/fungicide until a problem is diagnosed the dead portions on the leaves could be shipping damage, cold damage or previous virus/fungal/bacterial activity. ...


3

I would not choose either palm as an indoor plant. They are smaller and fast growing which makes them popular with the growers but if they are grown in less than optimum conditions (which is typical of indoor conditions, dim and dry) they can be stressed easily. Areca palms will get spider mites if conditions are not optimum and there is a source. Once ...


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