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13

It is a rubber fig (Ficus elastica). It's funny that you say it is an outdoor plant, because in my climate (Europe) it is an indoor plant (so I didn't expect this one), I have one in my living room. It contains, like all fig plants, white milky sap which can irritate the skin so be careful when pruning it. It propagates very easy by cuttings. Mine was a tip ...


12

That is lantana. ASPCA Website says: "Lantana Additional Common Names: Shrub Verbena, Yellow Sage, Red Sage Scientific Name: Lantana camara Family: Verbenaceae Toxicity: Toxic to Dogs, Toxic to Cats, Toxic to Horses Toxic Principles: Pentacyclic triterpenoids Clinical Signs: Vomiting, diarrhea, labored breathing, weakness. Liver failure - more common ...


9

It is Araucaria araucana (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Araucaria_araucana), commonly called the "monkey puzzle tree" in the UK (presumably because attempting to climb it would be an prickly experience). Its native habitat is in Chile at high altitudes (above 1000m). It is hardy down to about -20C.


6

Ricinus communis, common name - castor oil plant. Details here and here.


5

It's a dianthus; its wide green leaves indicate that it's probably a cultivar of Dianthus chinensis. These plants like cool weather and usually bloom in the spring in my area of the US - looks like you're living in a region with a mild winter, which means it will be a (possibly short-lived) perennial where you live. The flowers may smell sweetly of cloves.


5

At some point in the future I think you will find that your categories are too broadly defined as collections of even more basic categories. One of the fundamentals of database design is to reduce things to their essentials. This leaves room for distinguishing one category from another and also (which addresses your question) creating new compound categories ...


4

Yes, this looks very much like a wineberry. It's a type of raspberry. Wineberries are one of my favorite raspberries and one of the only I've ever seen that produce reliably in the shade. It is considered semi invasive in some areas so just beware.


4

A chunk of my garden is acidic, mostly dry shade, so here's what does well for me: Groundcovers: Lingonberries (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) - may require more water than you have under the trees, Wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens), Partridge berry (Mitchella repens) - afternoon sun could be a problem with this one, though. Perennials: Trillium, Uvularia (can ...


4

It's in the genus of Bryophyllum. Sometimes Bryophyllum is lumped in with the genus Kalanchoe. It has gone back and forth a couple times. The newest genome testing is showing that Bryophyllum should remain its own genus. Your plant is not in good enough condition to tell the exact species. If you live in a tropical region it can definitely be planted ...


3

They appear to be the characteristic "red" seeds of the cardboard cycad (Zamia furfuracea). It is not a true palm tree, but does have the appearance of a palm plant. The seeds (and plant) are known to be poisonous to dogs, so you might want to remove them - at least the seeds - for safety. Here are some specific links that should answer all of your ...


3

This looks an ideal setup to make a sub irrigated planter. You can look on youtube for many videos on how to construct these but you've got most of the construction already completed for you. So, in brief, your plan looks good. But to avoid the perched water table sitting above the rocks, make sure that there are gaps to allow some of the soil/potting mix ...


3

Long post..apologies in advance Question #1: Are they moving? Specifically, are they jumping? {{shivers down spine}} Jumping = Springtails (below) No Movement = could be the caste exosteleton of aphids (below) Question #2 If moving, have they made it to any vegetation and have you seen any damage or frass? Conclusion: Neither Springtails or Aphid ...


3

The problem with sites like this are there is often too little information about the whole year- as in where are the frost pockets, dark shaded bits and at what times of the day, soil type, pH, drainage, aspect, height and elevation, and more importantly, what you expect to do here- First thing I would do is measure out the site and then you can try to fix a ...


3

It would have been better to see a photo of the whole plant, but judging by what's there, its a Euphorbia of some variety. These are often difficult to dig out, because the roots can go down quite a way. Confirmation of it as a Euphorbia is if it produces white sap when you break a stem - that sap can be highly irritant on some people's skin, so wear gloves ...


3

Some kind of ivy is the obvious choice. Hedera hibernica is good ground cover, as are variegated forms of Hedera helix. But you do need to keep an eye on ivy as it can become horrendously invasive. Other spreading, drought-resistant possibilites are Vinca major 'Variegata', Hypericum calycinum and Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae (just coming into flower ...


3

They are self set saplings or seedlings of a tree, possibly elder. The lavender is dead and needs to be removed along with the saplings before they get any bigger.


3

Ignore the raised bits and drill the holes in the base- usually, there are round 'impressions' or thinner bits of plastic where the holes are meant to go, but if not, put about 4 small holes in each end with another 4 in the middle, between the two raised nubs.


3

You will need to dig out the Vinca with roots attached in order to tranplant it, and you should only do that when the winter is over and the ground is not frozen. If the area you want to transplant to dries out frequently during spring/early summer and you are unable to irrigate it frequently until they are established, it's probably best to pot up rooted ...


3

I think it is a mango Here is a picture of a mango leaf from the University of Wisconsin La Crosse. Tough Leaves Mango leaves are equipped with a thick outer cuticle to prevent water and nutrient loss. Also, mango leaves are found alternating on the plant stem to maximize the light energy received from the sun. This is due to the fact that mangos grow ...


2

This plant is desperate for more root room - the adventitious aerial roots it's producing are a stress response; a desperate attempt to try to find something else to root into so it can get larger. If the pot you show in your last picture is at least one inch bigger all round and below the size of the current rootball, then yes, you can use that pot. If it ...


2

If its Ocimum sanctum, common name Holy Basil, you won't be eating that I assume - it does look like its infested with mealybug/scale insect, and the fact you are not eating the plant widens the options for treatment. Neem oil will deal with them, but may not keep them away long term. If the infestation is light, then you can use a cotton bud dipped in ...


2

Yes, plants get “sensitive” when taken back indoors again. How much depends on how dark the indoors is an how long they stay inside. I would be careful and not just put them straight into full sun again. I recommend a simplified and shortened hardening off phase - certainly not as careful as when moving seedlings outside for the first time. Look at the ...


2

A few years ago I had to maintain the rather scrappy gardens of a run down block of flats in east London (annual rainfall - about 600mm). There was a large patch of bare ground that used to attract weeds. I used to spot treat these with Roundup every couple of weeks. After a year or so, moss started to cover this bare area (Roundup doesn't affect moss - ...


2

Moss is easily out competed by grass and weeds unless the environment favors it. I can find moss growing in cracks in the dry north side of the house or in shady wet areas. If you want to encourage moss what really makes it grow fast is continuous supply of moisture. Not sitting in water but on top of damp soil. Depending on your soil you could make a ...


2

There's no reason why your tomato plant would not give you much pleasure for a while. Assuming the grower chose a variety suitable for elevated temperature the existing trusses will likely go on to produce good fruit. However, there will be problems or the threat of problems. Many gardeners stop trying to grow tomatoes in the hot summers of the island ...


2

There is Hedera helix in your bed (ivy), which will make adding plants very difficult. The soil will be full of ivy roots which are hard to get rid of; these roots will also be preventing the soil from suffering erosion by falling off or being washed down the slope of the bed. Even if you clear an area for replanting, the ivy roots will very soon take it ...


2

Where you cut back to depends on whether your tomato plant is grafted onto another rootstock - it may be that the growth at the base is off the rootstock if its grafted, and that won't be the same variety of tomato as the topgrowth. If it is not grafted, I suggest you cut it right back to just above the green growth towards the base of the plant and let it ...


2

The white and yellow stuff on the soil are a combination of fungal growth and slime mould, likely caused by the soil in the pot being too wet for too long. The yellow growth appears to be an early stage Fuligo septica, common name dog's vomit slime mould, more info here https://wimastergardener.org/article/dog-vomit-slime-mold-fuligo-septica/. These types ...


2

It's either bearded iris (Iris germanica or Iris pallida) or possibly a Flag iris (Iris versicolor) and is dying back for the winter if you're in the Northern Hemisphere. If you're in the Southern Hemisphere, then the dying leaves are either a sign of an insect problem - probably the Iris Borer if those are common in your location - or over-watering.


2

That looks like either a Norfolk Island Pine (Auracaria heterophylla) or a Cook Pine (Araucaria columnaris). It is not a pine, but a conifer from either Norfolk Island or New Caledonia in the Pacific. Both trees make very pretty landscape trees; unfortunately, the one pictured appears to have been topped, although I could very well be wrong about that. In ...


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