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5

Best not used directly as fertilizer around plants, but its fine to add both as a component of your compost heap. Both take a while to break down, and large quantities might cause problems, because human hair and nails can contain heavy metals from the environment which have entered the body. Whether toxic levels of heavy metals are present in hair and nails ...


3

One "organic" option to provide iron is dried blood fertilizer, also called "blood meal". "Blood, fish, and bone" meal is also available. Of course the blood came from slaughtered food animals, and there is no guarantee that they were farmed "organically" - whatever that means! These products are also nitrogen-rich, and you need to take that into account ...


3

I don't know how many Vigoro triple mixes exist, if more than one, but the Vigoro triple mix that I've read about online since seeing your question is advertised as being usable for vegetables. So, the company at least seems to think we should think it's safe. However, it's supposed to be used more as a soil amendment or mulch than anything, as I understand ...


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Since anyone can set up their own triple mix business without regulation and there are no controls over what can actually be in it there is no such thing as a strict database of scientific information for this product; MSDS depends on the fact that the products listed are very narrowly defined and consistent. There have been some efforts to define what ...


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To get the iron without the nitrogen, you can use chelated iron. It's iron converted to a water soluble form for use in agriculture. Apparently seaweed fertilizer can also be high in iron.


2

Hair does not breakdown for years and would make a fibrous mess in mulch. It does have a good garden use,however : It is very good to discourage rabbits from eating your garden. Apparently after months of exposure , rabbits still recognize it as evidence of a dangerous predator ( a k a , people).I used it sparingly in the fall ( to protect stems above the ...


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I like your original idea. Sticking with your woodland trees with lots of underbrush. Poplars are fast growers. Not just above the surface, but below as well. They create a vast network of roots underground. Use native species. They will have better biodiversity. You can get them ungrafted, but your hybrid is probably grafted on different root stock. I ...


1

It is a difficult question and I think you could do very little for storage of CO2. To directly combat climate change with storage, you should store CO2, so it means you need to create new organic matter in your soil, so probably lawn with very frequent mowing, and without removing cut herbs, but in your climate you will not get much storage. (or better, you ...


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If you live in the USA, you could sell the produce as 'organic' in theory, provided the nutrients you supply to your plants are on the approved list as 'organic nutrients'. This area is not a clear one in the USA though, see here https://modernfarmer.com/2017/05/is-hydro-organic-farming-organic/ However, in most other countries of the world, no, ...


1

Both hair and feathers are considered to be a slow-release source of nitrogen (I've read about this in the past, although the links in my answer here aren't my initial sources). They aren't significant sources of phosphorus or potassium, however. Bamboo already alluded to this, but one study seems to suggest that human hair makes a reasonable fertilizer for ...


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