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5

Best not used directly as fertilizer around plants, but its fine to add both as a component of your compost heap. Both take a while to break down, and large quantities might cause problems, because human hair and nails can contain heavy metals from the environment which have entered the body. Whether toxic levels of heavy metals are present in hair and nails ...


4

I don't know how many Vigoro triple mixes exist, if more than one, but the Vigoro triple mix that I've read about online since seeing your question is advertised as being usable for vegetables. So, the company at least seems to think we should think it's safe. However, it's supposed to be used more as a soil amendment or mulch than anything, as I understand ...


3

Since anyone can set up their own triple mix business without regulation and there are no controls over what can actually be in it there is no such thing as a strict database of scientific information for this product; MSDS depends on the fact that the products listed are very narrowly defined and consistent. There have been some efforts to define what ...


3

One "organic" option to provide iron is dried blood fertilizer, also called "blood meal". "Blood, fish, and bone" meal is also available. Of course the blood came from slaughtered food animals, and there is no guarantee that they were farmed "organically" - whatever that means! These products are also nitrogen-rich, and you need to take that into account ...


2

Corn gluten meal (CGM) which is a byproduct of some corn processing methods and can be attained very cheaply in a raw form from a grain mill, or purchased for quite a bit more money as a “natural / organic crab grass preventative” is a great choice. Crab grass is an annual and thus controlling it in my zone (Ohio) usually happens around the time the ...


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To get the iron without the nitrogen, you can use chelated iron. It's iron converted to a water soluble form for use in agriculture. Apparently seaweed fertilizer can also be high in iron.


2

Hair does not breakdown for years and would make a fibrous mess in mulch. It does have a good garden use,however : It is very good to discourage rabbits from eating your garden. Apparently after months of exposure , rabbits still recognize it as evidence of a dangerous predator ( a k a , people).I used it sparingly in the fall ( to protect stems above the ...


1

If you live in the USA, you could sell the produce as 'organic' in theory, provided the nutrients you supply to your plants are on the approved list as 'organic nutrients'. This area is not a clear one in the USA though, see here https://modernfarmer.com/2017/05/is-hydro-organic-farming-organic/ However, in most other countries of the world, no, ...


1

Both hair and feathers are considered to be a slow-release source of nitrogen (I've read about this in the past, although the links in my answer here aren't my initial sources). They aren't significant sources of phosphorus or potassium, however. Bamboo already alluded to this, but one study seems to suggest that human hair makes a reasonable fertilizer for ...


1

Over the past few years I have tried most of the typical approaches mentioned in some of the previous answers, usually only with some sort of success, but never for 100%. However, near the end of last year, and during the entire winter period, I have allowed our chickens (they are only 3) to walk around anywhere in my vegetables garden. I was told that by ...


1

Organic sources of NPK will decompose and release nutrients more slowly than liquid fertilizers. Plus, OM supports bacteria and fungi which do the job. Compost, for instance, is a "topsoil builder" thanks to those attributes. Chemical fertilizers, on the other hand, feed the plants directly . Over-fertilization may provide excess salts that will upset the ...


1

No. It is just important for soil (soil structure), as it help to keep fertilizers (if you are in a sandy soil) and moisture. On a pot, I think it is better (in my opinion) to use good soil, and replace it from time to time (every few years). I would care much more about what N, P, and K is in both fertilizers (e.g. if fertilizers will be released quick or ...


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Glyphosate is relatively safe to use. While there currently is some data about health effects, they are long term with chronic exposure. It breaks down in the soil. Of the various herbicides I've read about it is the least bad. Buckthorn is fairly salt tolerant. I would be surprised if epsom salts worked. If you are totally anti-chemical, try this ...


1

You missed your best chance to kill them, which would have been to paint the stumps with brushwood killer - but you need to do that immediately after cutting, so plant will carry the chemical down into its roots before it "realizes" it doesn't have leaves any more. The next best option is probably to spray ALL new leafy growth as soon as the leaves start to ...


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In addition to the document you reference note that Ontario has done quite a bit of work on this subject too. See this publication for example. Heavy pruning followed by dedicated consistent shoot removal is one option, but a time consuming one.


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