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11

You may actually have purchased a "dyed" orchid. While a very few varieties of phaleonopsis in the blue/purple family exist, they are rare, and will produce the same colored flowers each blooming season. They're also a lighter, less vibrant color than the one you're describing. Most orchids in that color spectrum are actually white orchids which ...


7

Okay, from your picture, those are Phalaenopsis orchids. They seem to be doing well in the light level you are giving them, although I don't think they need to be under a light 24 hours a day. In order to re-bloom a Phalaenopsis orchid, they need a rest where they are watered very sparingly, followed by a time of lower light levels until the new growth ...


6

This is merely my experience with Phalaenopsis, so take it with a grain of salt. I've built up a collection of orchids bought at the grocery store on discount after their flowers died off, so they cost next to nothing. Many I have just kept in the pots they came in, but so far two (I believe they are the oldest two I have) have gotten enough runners (or ...


6

These plants are Moth orchids or Phalaenopsis. They don't actually need soil as they are epiphytes. The air roots are a sign of a healthy plant. The plants have not been in the pot that long and can probably go a few more years. Your next pot should have a free draining mix including shredded bark. Your watering and fertilizer regime are working well as ...


6

Orchid need light. You should keep it in a well-lit place, but avoiding too much sunshine. Temperature should remain above 18°C. Orchid need to have breathing roots: you must make sure your pot allows sufficient air circulation. Your pot does not look like a regular for orchids. Here is an example: its ok to see the roots (I would remove the moss that hide ...


6

Both of those orchids are extremely dehydrated. I don't know about the second one, but the first one isn't going to plump back out. Any new leaves will be full, but the ones that are severely wrinkled are going to stay that way. Most orchids are epiphytes. That means that they grow in trees. The reason for this is that they get an advantage over the plants ...


6

Wow! Why do my orchids never do that? ;-) As you can read, I have no hands on experience with this, but I know this phenomenon. It is called a Keiki, a baby orchid. The baby is a clone of its mother. As you can see, your Keiki has leafs and roots already, and even starts to produce these canes for flowers. I say your Keiki is ready to live on its own. You ...


5

When I worked with epiphytes we used the locally available trees as a substrate when cork was not suitable for the desired look. When we used wood: bark was always removed. It could contain insect eggs or other problems. As a tree's first line of defence this is where you are most likely to have natural compounds or residues that the orchid will not like. ...


5

The environment you describe sounds quite challenging for most plants. You might find some of these points to be relevant to the design of your enclosure: plants do not need any terrestrial soil to grow but they need a substrate to cling to they grow best in high humidity indicating a sealed environment with air circulation they do not flower until the ...


5

Tree barks historically are used to grow orchids as that simulates their natural habitat where as epiphytes they cling to the branches as an air plant. In NZ pine bark is used, heat treated to 400 deg to sterilise it, and it may last 5 years without rotting which could damage your orchid roots. As they decay there may be some nutrient released to the roots, ...


5

Alright, so the first thing I'd suggest is looking up a channel on youtube.com called 'Brad's Greenhouse'. It's a dude in Canada that has a ton of great videos, including a pretty extensive one on these store bought phals. I'll try to give an overview here. I'll be honest in saying that while my phals are healthy, mine haven't re-bloomed. I also haven't ...


5

These all look like flower shoots ( spikes ) that are developing. The one at the base is typically 3 leaves below the youngest. The others are second spikes developing on existing spikes. Some people recommend not letting the second spikes to flower since it might exhaust the orchid.


5

It is a Phalaenopsis orchid, commonly known as moth orchid, and they come in a very wide range of colours - I'd describe yours as pale yellow. This is one of the easiest orchids to care for, and they make long lived houseplants, given the right conditions. They do not like to dry out, but equally must not be overwatered, never being left sitting in water in ...


4

I have occasionally had luck getting my phalaenopsis orchids to bloom by putting them in the fridge over-night. I don't know empirically that this works, but when an orchid has been not blooming for a while I give it a try and sometimes it seems to bloom afterwards. They definitely don't need the cold to get them to bloom, because I have plants that start ...


4

I doubt you will get the stem to root, at that stage. Probably the best option would be to put it in a vase and see if it will bloom, as Stephie mentioned in a comment.


4

Ok, first some clarification or base phalenopsis anatomy: The long stem = flower stalk. The greyish-green, slightly wrinkeled thingies = roots. The green thick thingies in the moss = also roots. So what's happening here? If the flowers have fallen off, the flower stem may or may not re-bloom. Unless it's really dried out, do not cut it off. You may trim ...


4

57 should be fine, it looks to me as though the spots are supposed to be there, and will be part of the color of the flower... If it were damage it would probably be too late to do anything anyway... I would just preach patience in this case.


4

The second pic looks like it has not had enough water. The bottom part of each stem should be swollen with moisture. Different people water them different ways. But the orchids come from high humidity, low-light jungles mostly. So... Mist them every day with clean water without chlorine or chloramines, not tap water. To water you can pour clean non-city ...


4

Lots of orchids are epiphytes, with their roots twining round the bark, their layered leaves building up, and the flowering stem pointing in any direction (up towards the light, sideways, even down, especially when mature and load-bearing with buds and blossom). Some people try to move their orchids into a more natural position and use a hanging basket like ...


4

From appearances, your orchid looks like a dendrobium. It's not true that orchids can be watered with a water spray bottle. During active growth, the planting mix should never be allowed to become too dry. The best way to check is to press a finger into the growing mix. If you can feel moisture, it doesnt need watering yet. When it's resting, the mix can be ...


4

What a fabulous idea! Another way that I have found effective is to fill a hand spray with water and trace elements and spray it on the orchid. I use ENO or Epsom salts in the spray and have had good results.


4

Really looks like a Cymbidium orchid, one of the hardy species perhaps. The roots in loose clothing matches, and the pseudobulbs of the dead stems.


3

In a word, no. Spiders of that size will not harm plants. They will look for shelter in the leaves and roots. That is a pretty healthy looking orchid. What has changed to cause the change in the roots? I might assume that the watering schedule has changed. That might cause the changes you see.


3

I would expect the total growth of the nearer set of leaves on this plant (nearer to camera in the last view) to die. I don't know what was the plant's history, but it is clear that something, perhaps water left in the leaf axils (where the leaves emerge from the growing stem) started a rot, but I'll be first to admit that I had not seen this happen with ...


3

On the care and requirements of Vanilla planfolia Humidity: Over 50% is optimal. These plants thrive in very high humidity. However, steam is a little much. Try to keep it between 50 and 90% rh. 65-70% is ideal. Temperature: Vanilla planfolia likes a daytime temperature of 80-85 degrees Fahrenheit, while at night, they prefer a temperature of 60-65 degrees ...


3

There are many cultivars of Phalaeonopsis, with more being introduced all the time, but unless you bought from a specialist orchid grower, most cultivars aren't named other than as Phalaenopsis. Unless there's something particularly different about this plant (maybe generally smaller, flower form slightly different, etc) which would indicate a particular ...


3

I asked a similar question (How Should I Take Care of These Two Phalaenopsis Orchids with Different Behaviors?) a few days ago but still no answer. I've done further more investigations about that, going to a gardening store and trying to get some help, but even those people weren't super helpful. The suggestions I received were to let the roots receive sun ...


3

Its tough to identify from what you have provided but my guess would be phaius tankervillae. Commonly called "the nun orchid" because the petals and the way the flowers hang down resemble a nun's habit. Its fairly common in garden centers. If your vendor was a nursery or supplies to them then phaius tankervillae would be an example of a plant that he ...


3

It's a hybrid cattleya orchid named Joy Sakabe "Shining" - more specifically a Rhyncholaeliocattleya (Rlc.) Here is a link to a Wikipedia article explaining the naming a little bit more. It is indeed purple, and quite attractive. Cattleyas are fairly easy to care for, for the most part, requiring a fair bit more light than many other genera, but rewarding ...


3

You should certainly clip off anything that looks yellow or brown, even if it's just the tip of a leaf or root or the whole thing just above the core. The bite holes can be left, that's purely aesthetic. I also wouldn't recommend watering it with aquarium water as there could be microbes in it which may have contributed to some of that yellow growth on the ...


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