Hot answers tagged

9

Unless harmful elements fell into your manure during those 20 years without your knowledge, it certainly shouldn't hurt anything. It might not be as potent as properly matured and composted manure, that's all. Concerning your clay soil : don't work in your garden if it rained in the last 2 days to avoid compacting the soil.


9

I planted some Oxalis deppei in the garden at my university last year and it looked just like your plant. It had little dark pink flowers and spread like crazy, from 15 bulbs planted in spring I got at least 50 bulbs in autumn, including smaller ones. This was on a rocky small area that somewhat contained them.


8

When you plant a sprouted onion, the hope is it produces roots at the bottom - if it does, it will keep producing green shoots. It will not, though, produce any onions, as such, but you can use the green shoots as you would chives. You've not said how long ago you planted the onion, but if its only been 2 or 3 weeks, its possible it hasn't produced roots, ...


7

Yes you can grow onions in containers. You can usually buy onion sets from local stores which will produce a good size onion much faster than starting from seed. Garlic works as well. We are currently growing it in 2 inch diameter pots from a clove bought from the store. With containers, bigger is better subject to some limitations. wet soil is heavy. ...


7

How much sun are they getting? Onions need close to full sun in order to do really well. Onions are also considered moderately heavy feeders - this means that the compost you are using may not contain enough nitrogen to meet the needs of your onion starts. If you want to stay organic, there are plenty of granular or liquid organic fertilizers that are ...


7

Sounds like perfect stuff. You are going into winter, yes? If you are, just put it on top of the beds thickly. This will help keep the weed seeds already in the soil from germinating as well. In the spring, when your soil has dried, double dig your vegetable beds 3' in width throwing the clay soil on top of the manure. Micro and macro organisms have ...


5

For 4 months you can try the root cellar. Do not jar or vacuum them - hang them in a mesh bag or lay them out in a wooden crate. Freezing generally turns them to mush that won't grow. 16 months? If they have not been pre-poisioned with something, eat them. Otherwise, give them away in 4 months, as that ain't happening. You may need some extras in 4 months ...


5

The "cabbage worm" which is really a caterpillar of the cabbage moth is best prevented by preventing the moth from accessing the plant - hoops of floating row cover are commonly deployed over cabbage-family plants (such as broccoli and kale) to provide this protection. Once they are present, the most common "generally considered environmentally safe" ...


5

The onions are planted from bulb to early April, the distance of planting should be 10-15 cm from plant to plant, and 15-20 cm between rows, each bulb will grow from a single onion. The harvest of onions is from August to September when the leaves turn yellow and bend on the ground, once removed from the ground onions can be left on the ground to dry them ...


4

I have always just plant onion bulbs in the ground. I do not think your Phase 1 is necessary at all. Here are a couple of links with detailed information on planting onions Wikihow Grow Onions or Gardeners.com.


4

I've been container gardening for a number of years, as I'm limited in the available space I have at my town center terraced house. The containers are all at the back of my south-facing house. I also have a small plastic green house. In the containers I grow onion sets, spring onions, lettuce, beetroot, asparagus, potatoes, strawberries, a gooseberry bush, ...


4

They're onion aphids. They infest my green onions, and garlic. Although visible on the green garlic shoots, they get into the bulb. I've even found them inside garlic imported from overseas. Just keep washing them off with water. But I find that they keep coming back if the plants are in anyway weakened by non-perfect growing conditions. How to control ...


4

I really can't tell much from the picture. However insects are quite purposeful. If they are on your plants they are not there for a vacation. The most likely candidate are aphids who come in many colours. Try a spray of soap and water at 5 ml/litre. Spray and leave on for a few minutes then rinse with water. If they don't come back, job done!


4

I contacted Baker Creek to find the answer (since they grow both of the varieties I referenced in the links: Crimson Forest and He Shi Ko; He Shi Ko isn't the bulbing type, though—just Crimson Forest, although it may not have large bulbs). They said both varieties multiply at the base (and are both winter hardy perennials down to zone 3). So, it sounds ...


4

To come straight to an answer which may be of relevance to you, consider that the onion family has become adapted to a wide variety of growing environments. One member of that family is the Egyptian, Tree or Walking onion which develops clusters of small bulbils at the end of the flowering stalk. These become heavy, flop over and take root at a small ...


3

Did you purchase seed garlic that was spongy? If so, take it back and ask for a refund! Garlic is supposed to be planted when there's a chance for frost. The cold stimulates bulb formation. Otherwise you will likely just end up with tiny bulbs and a lot of leaves. And, if you're planting from garlic that was meant to be eaten, well, you take your ...


3

They aren't incredibly fast, but do spread. A single plant I put in about 5 years ago is now a solid patch about 1' by 3' long. I have done some weeding out of plants that spread where I didn't want them, but not a lot. (ETA: This is in zone 4b.) It's a plant I think anyone who likes green onions should have. I use the green onions from early spring through ...


3

I've grown onions in containers for several summers. They do grow quite well, but I have noticed that they don't grow near as large as they do if grown in the ground. The pots I've used are about 15" in diameter, and I've grown about 4 -5 onions in them, depending on how large you want the onions to get. It's nice too, because you can use the onion tops for ...


3

You don't mention what variety of onion you have, but for how you're planning to use them, I'd recommend fairly close spacing -- perhaps 1" apart. Normally I plant onions (for mature/bulb harvesting) at about 4" apart in rows 6" apart. This gives them plenty of space so the bulbs are competing with each other. If you've already transplanted them, you may ...


2

No value at all, frankly, particularly not in the way you suggest using the powder, regardless of any possible nutrient value. I'm not 100% sure what you mean when you say you 'powdered' them, that sort of suggests you ground them up and dried them. Onions are acidic as they decompose, and drive away worms and other bio organisms in the ground, which would ...


2

Try row cloth...great stuff for all kinds of reasons. If you put up some little hoops or stakes you can keep them under the cloth all season. Water, air and sunlight go through this very light material. Great to hold in heat and extend the season at both ends. If you have root crops, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, use row cloth on these guys to prevent ...


2

I just transplant them as is and that usually works. Since they will grow from even a small bit of root, and most of the leave removed for cooking, they seem to be pretty resilient. Some people find that they grow better when planted as a bunch rather than by themselves. If they get into their second year, I let them flower and keep the seeds to plant ...


2

I've used Nemasys for fruit and veg. They are little worms and should be added to water when watering. Hope it will work. It worked on slugs in my courgette before and it is organic.


2

In addition to what has already been stated, I would be careful not to rely on just cow manure. It would be beneficial to mix in other nutrients to the soil depending on the vegetables you are growing. For example, I mix horse manure with chicken manure to my vegetable garden. Then during the growing and harvesting season, I add other organic fertilizers ...


2

I would plant half NOW and half during the fall. Otherwise, they could easily succumb to botrytis, all of them. Eating them would be good as well. You could eat some of the more mature and leave some planted now as well as planting more for the fall. But plant at least half now. I use potato cellars and they do well when going into a winter. But now, ...


2

If you want your plants to develop flowers don't cut the leaves. The leaves help a plant to do photosynthesis and the bulbs are storage organs. When you regularly cut the leaves, the bulbs grow very slowly or don't grow at all. Usually a bulb has to be more than 2 cm (1 inch) in diameter in order for the plant to flower. If you sow the seeds in spring you ...


1

Not necessarily - chives are perennial bulbs which die back naturally for winter, hardy down to Zone 3, and will return year on year, in spring lasting up till fall, outdoors. You can try taking some indoors, but that means digging up the bulbs and disturbing their root system, which likely will mean they die back. Alternatively, cut the stems, snip them ...


1

I've read that potatoes are treated to minimize sprouting while in storage. Maybe something similar is done to onions?


1

I planted some last year and if anything the patch has shrunk. So, at least in my climate it takes some time for them to spread. They were planted into a bath being used as a raised bed into potting mix so no competition from weeds, and intercropped with carrots. I'd imagine in less favourable circumstances they take a long time.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible