8

This tree looks like a Ficus Benjamina or close relative. These are also common office and house plants because they are fairly easy to care for. They tolerate low light levels fairly well, though they may not support as many leaves when the light is so low. In humid conditions they sometimes grow air roots out of their branches. If the roots touch the ...


7

This is a Maranta arundinacea which has been grown in low light so the white parts of the leaf are less obvious. I base this on the the prominent leaf sheaths and the limited variegation. They are similar to the Aglaonemas, commonly called Chinese Evergreen, but most aglos have more consistent variegation across the entire leaf. The definitive way to ...


7

I can't get a close enough image to examine the spots thoroughly, but because they're evenly spaced, its most likely these are sporangia, or spore cases. It's a sign of a healthy plant and the spores are produced as part of the reproductive process. Rust infection can be a problem on these plants in some areas, but the orange spots are randomly spaced, so ...


7

Like many plants, Jade plant stems are comprised of 'nodes and internodes' (the nodes containing the concentrated meristem tissue): The nodes hold one or more leaves, as well as buds which can grow into branches (with leaves, conifer cones, or inflorescences (flowers)). Adventitious roots may also be produced from the nodes. The internodes distance one ...


6

I hope it's still alive, It's definitely a fern, which usually grows beneath the canopy of trees where it's usually shaded and humid. Picture a walk through a misty forest, full of moss and ferns in their home. Humidity and mild lighting are key. Keep it away from ceiling lights because they're fluorescent lights which are actually used in horticulture to ...


6

Yes, in good light the Mass Cane, or Dracaena massangea as it is also called propagates readily without grafting. If the stem has died you take a sharp knife or sequiteur and cut off the healthy portion. All of the methods below have worked for me: if the stem is over six inches you can plunge it into a soil less mix and provide light and water stems also ...


6

Plant number one is a Rhapis excelsa palm, a real beauty.They grow well in bright diffuse light but will tolerate periods of low light. The die back at the ends of the leaves is natural. Just take a pair of scissors and trim it off leaving a tiny margin of dead material on the leaf so you do not cut into live tissue. Plant number two is a Dracaena Janet ...


6

I have had several aloe plants derived from one tiny plant 29 years ago! I am in Michigan and they live on my window sill facing east so they get the morning sun. They have thrived so much that I have repotted several of the pups for centerpieces at a wedding shower and a baby shower. I did pot some to put on my outdoor deck one summer and the direct sun ...


6

I assume that you yourself will be the only one watering the plant. Most people use a saucer under the pot (without gravel) and avoid too much water build up by watering the plant only as needed. If you do over water the plant you can carefully empty the saucer or leave it until the excess has soaked into the soil (it's very unlikely that you will get ...


6

It is most likely Dracaena fragrans, in my humble opinion it's the classical office plant. It's interesting that it started to flourish as it almost always just dies over time.


5

If it is a true aloe vera, then it will eventually need a larger pot, because it will create "pups" (small offshoots) around its base, which will then grow to full size (maybe as tall as 18") and then produce pups of their own, which will then grow to full size... The smallest pot I'd try to keep a true aloe vera plant in would be a 12" (30 cm) pot. And ...


5

Soft water: I don't know if "soft water" is the correct translation. I mean non calcareous water. A good cut: You have to avoid crushing the xylem. Use precision scissors or an scalpel (cutter). If your really want a long lasting rose, make a new cut every day (or at least three days) to make sure the xylem remain open. Removes what is not necessary: ...


5

Generally when the fruit is no longer green and releases easily from the tree it is ready. If it doesn't come off with a gentle tug wait a couple of days and try again. The small size is probably due to no one thinning the fruit earlier in the season.


5

I have African Violets and Phalaenopsis orchids currently blooming in my south facing office window. They prefer a more diffused light, however, so unless it is cloudy I keep the blinds somewhat closed - up to 75% closed. Since I work in the greater Seattle area, however, most of the time I don't have to worry about them getting too much sun. ;-) Other ...


5

I rather like the look of your particular plant, its a sort of curly ponytail, more attractive to me than its usual appearance. Your plant doesn't look at all like its dying either - however, brown tips indicate either over or under watering - if the tips are dry and crispy, it could be underwatering, but this plant can go a long time without water without ...


5

I agree with Bamboo in their previous answer that this is a Scheffelera 'Amate'. A trade marked cultivar that can be identified by the glossier leaves in a lighter green than the species and resistance to spider mites. I also agree that the best thing for the appearance of this plant is cut it back hard. These plants bud readily from old wood which you have ...


5

If the lights are extremely close to the plants, you could do a lot more kinds of plants, but I imagine they're on the ceiling, which is very far away. You might experiment with a Grandpa's Home pepper, but no guarantees. Supposedly you can grow it like a houseplant. If you could put a grow light in the office, you should have better results. One of those ...


5

The whitish spots look like pesticide residue to me. This is most likely on a new plant. One of the last things the growers do before shipping is an application of pesticide to take of insect pests. It could also be dissolved salts from alkaline water. Take a cloth and rub the leaves, if it comes off it is a residue. Wash your hands afterwards in case ...


5

Here is a quick answer Take it home Cut every leaf off Reduce water and wait for new growth to appear When scale appears use 5 ml dish soap to one litre water apply with rag or cloth three times at six day intervals


4

I'd add to Kevinsky's answer, with which I entirely agree - if possible, do not use a self watering pot. I've never yet seen a plant in one of those long term that continues to do well, they almost always get problems from the constant availability of moisture. It's a great shame that the John Innes formula potting composts do not seem to be available in ...


4

This plant is an Anthurium, a member of the aroid family, who are identified by the flower structure of the spathe and spadix. high intensity filtered light, not direct. If it doesn't flower then the light levels are too low a free draining soil such as peat moss, perlite and pine bark water thoroughly and let dry underwatering or low humidity levels will ...


4

It does have a noticeable scent, but only if you bruise the leaves, usually. Any allergic response via the air is mostly restricted to when the plant flowers, which is unlikely indoors - it's the pollen that can cause a nasal response in sensitised people. Otherwise, some people may experience contact allergy after brushing against it.


4

Pothos generally like a bright or well lit spot, but not sunlight. They will grow in lower light levels, but those varieties with variegated leaves will lose the variegation in low light situations. On the assumption you want one at home, if you can find a spot for it reasonably close to a window where the sun doesn't reach it, it should be fine - its a ...


4

A few drops of vodka and a teaspoon of sugar every other day with fresh water does the trick for all my cut flowers... Vodka to stop bacterial growth, and sugar to nourish the flowers. I originally come from a former USSR country, and this trick is very popular there. Once I got 16 days out of cut roses which has been an unbroken record in my house!


4

Another thing that I've been told is that you should cut their stems every couple of days. They should be cut on an angle, and under running water to avoid oxygen getting into the stem. This helps to extend their life, but one other option is to dry the flowers to keep for your enjoyment later.


4

It's one of two things, or probably a combination - Impatiens walleriana (which this one seems to be), commonly known as busy lizzie (or apparently, Patient Lucy in the States), is prone to guttation if water levels are high, or if its just been watered. The other thing it does sometimes is form what seem to be little sugar crystals, often on the stems or ...


4

Your plant appears to be Zamioculcus zamiifolia (more easily known as ZZ plant). These dark blotches or spots are quite normal and nothing to worry about - they develop on older stems. The stem I'm uncertain about is the more yellowish coloured stem with blotches in the forefront of the picture, that one might have a problem, because of its yellowish colour ...


3

Given that half a day's sun will be available, and that you need easy care, small growing plants which don't droop and trail, I'd recommend the following, in order of preference for your situation: Sansevieria hahnii (not to be confused with S. trifasciata laurentii) and Sansevieria golden hahnii. Easy care, tolerates dryness if you forget to water, doesn't ...


3

The other thread included a very good list, but I have one more to add - Zamioculcas, also called "ZZ plant". I have one at home that was about 5 feet from a window, and doing very poorly. I moved it to a corner that is about 20 feet from the window and gets no direct sun, and now it is thriving. Very hardy, likes to be neglected.


3

When peaches are ready depends a lot on your tastes. However, if they're falling off the tree in large numbers, and you want to save all the peaches, it's probably a good idea to start picking them (or you'll lose a lot). You might just put something below to catch them and cushion their fall, and then shake off the ones that are loose; you can let the ...


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