14

For many indoor tropical plants life in the office is slow death. You may feel that way yourself after a bad day! With minimal light levels and good watering practices most tropicals will live for a while. The ones that require high light will draw on their stored resources in the roots and gradually go downhill. Tropicals that tolerate low light levels for ...


8

This tree looks like a Ficus Benjamina or close relative. These are also common office and house plants because they are fairly easy to care for. They tolerate low light levels fairly well, though they may not support as many leaves when the light is so low. In humid conditions they sometimes grow air roots out of their branches. If the roots touch the ...


7

You could get multiple plants and rotate which one is in your office every few weeks, bringing one home on a Friday night and then the next one in on a Monday morning. Honestly I had no idea what kind of stress these changes would put on a plant compared to staying in the office full-time, but I suspect it would work.


7

This is a Maranta arundinacea which has been grown in low light so the white parts of the leaf are less obvious. I base this on the the prominent leaf sheaths and the limited variegation. They are similar to the Aglaonemas, commonly called Chinese Evergreen, but most aglos have more consistent variegation across the entire leaf. The definitive way to ...


7

You can probably get a number of fruiting plants to flower and set fruit once indoors. I have seen coffee plants, citrus and members of the fig family flower and set fruit or seed indoors under fluorescents. The problem is that flowering and fruiting takes a lot of energy. If the plant does not have more illumination than standard indoor light levels ...


7

I can't get a close enough image to examine the spots thoroughly, but because they're evenly spaced, its most likely these are sporangia, or spore cases. It's a sign of a healthy plant and the spores are produced as part of the reproductive process. Rust infection can be a problem on these plants in some areas, but the orange spots are randomly spaced, so ...


7

Like many plants, Jade plant stems are comprised of 'nodes and internodes' (the nodes containing the concentrated meristem tissue): The nodes hold one or more leaves, as well as buds which can grow into branches (with leaves, conifer cones, or inflorescences (flowers)). Adventitious roots may also be produced from the nodes. The internodes distance one ...


6

Peppers and some tomatoes will easily fruit indoors, provided they get enough light. You might want to try indoor avocados too, and keep the size small by pruning.


6

I have had several aloe plants derived from one tiny plant 29 years ago! I am in Michigan and they live on my window sill facing east so they get the morning sun. They have thrived so much that I have repotted several of the pups for centerpieces at a wedding shower and a baby shower. I did pot some to put on my outdoor deck one summer and the direct sun ...


6

I assume that you yourself will be the only one watering the plant. Most people use a saucer under the pot (without gravel) and avoid too much water build up by watering the plant only as needed. If you do over water the plant you can carefully empty the saucer or leave it until the excess has soaked into the soil (it's very unlikely that you will get ...


6

Plant number one is a Rhapis excelsa palm, a real beauty.They grow well in bright diffuse light but will tolerate periods of low light. The die back at the ends of the leaves is natural. Just take a pair of scissors and trim it off leaving a tiny margin of dead material on the leaf so you do not cut into live tissue. Plant number two is a Dracaena Janet ...


6

Yes, in good light the Mass Cane, or Dracaena massangea as it is also called propagates readily without grafting. If the stem has died you take a sharp knife or sequiteur and cut off the healthy portion. All of the methods below have worked for me: if the stem is over six inches you can plunge it into a soil less mix and provide light and water stems also ...


6

I hope it's still alive, It's definitely a fern, which usually grows beneath the canopy of trees where it's usually shaded and humid. Picture a walk through a misty forest, full of moss and ferns in their home. Humidity and mild lighting are key. Keep it away from ceiling lights because they're fluorescent lights which are actually used in horticulture to ...


6

It is most likely Dracaena fragrans, in my humble opinion it's the classical office plant. It's interesting that it started to flourish as it almost always just dies over time.


5

If it is a true aloe vera, then it will eventually need a larger pot, because it will create "pups" (small offshoots) around its base, which will then grow to full size (maybe as tall as 18") and then produce pups of their own, which will then grow to full size... The smallest pot I'd try to keep a true aloe vera plant in would be a 12" (30 cm) pot. And ...


5

Soft water: I don't know if "soft water" is the correct translation. I mean non calcareous water. A good cut: You have to avoid crushing the xylem. Use precision scissors or an scalpel (cutter). If your really want a long lasting rose, make a new cut every day (or at least three days) to make sure the xylem remain open. Removes what is not necessary: ...


5

Generally when the fruit is no longer green and releases easily from the tree it is ready. If it doesn't come off with a gentle tug wait a couple of days and try again. The small size is probably due to no one thinning the fruit earlier in the season.


5

I rather like the look of your particular plant, its a sort of curly ponytail, more attractive to me than its usual appearance. Your plant doesn't look at all like its dying either - however, brown tips indicate either over or under watering - if the tips are dry and crispy, it could be underwatering, but this plant can go a long time without water without ...


5

I have African Violets and Phalaenopsis orchids currently blooming in my south facing office window. They prefer a more diffused light, however, so unless it is cloudy I keep the blinds somewhat closed - up to 75% closed. Since I work in the greater Seattle area, however, most of the time I don't have to worry about them getting too much sun. ;-) Other ...


5

IMO,You can keep Dracaena sanderiana (we call them Bamboo in Iran, and some people believe they bring their owners luck and some call them lucky Bamboos). They can survive in many indoor conditions, they don't need high light level or sunlight.


5

I have not grown Kohleria, but I have grown other gesneriads, namely Gloxinia, Streptocarpus, and Saintpaulia (African Violets). These plants all strongly dislike having cold water sprinkled over their leaves. Judging from the character and distribution of the spotting on the plant pictured, I would guess that is the problem. Watering the plants from the ...


5

Although I really like indoor plants, in my honest opinion, they have no way to prevent pests. Most pests are attracted by wet environments. If your soil is constantly wet, I bet there will be flies. If the soil contains organic substance, there will be other bugs too. I can't see if you have a tray under the container. If there isn't a tray to hold the ...


5

They need bright light, but cannot tolerate hot sun. Because you have no sun, that won't be a problem. Because you have fluorescent lighting bright enough to light an office, you can grow a kohleria. It would be best to grow them as close to the light as possible. On the desk is better than on the floor, and a filing cabinet is better than the desk. That is, ...


5

I agree with Bamboo in their previous answer that this is a Scheffelera 'Amate'. A trade marked cultivar that can be identified by the glossier leaves in a lighter green than the species and resistance to spider mites. I also agree that the best thing for the appearance of this plant is cut it back hard. These plants bud readily from old wood which you have ...


5

If the lights are extremely close to the plants, you could do a lot more kinds of plants, but I imagine they're on the ceiling, which is very far away. You might experiment with a Grandpa's Home pepper, but no guarantees. Supposedly you can grow it like a houseplant. If you could put a grow light in the office, you should have better results. One of those ...


5

The whitish spots look like pesticide residue to me. This is most likely on a new plant. One of the last things the growers do before shipping is an application of pesticide to take of insect pests. It could also be dissolved salts from alkaline water. Take a cloth and rub the leaves, if it comes off it is a residue. Wash your hands afterwards in case ...


5

Here is a quick answer Take it home Cut every leaf off Reduce water and wait for new growth to appear When scale appears use 5 ml dish soap to one litre water apply with rag or cloth three times at six day intervals


4

I believe they are springtails. The definitive identification is whether they fly. If they jump around when the soil is watered: springtails. If they fly into your face or to the window: fungus gnats. If they are white and fly when disturbed they are whitefly. While the first two are annoying control can be as simple as keeping things dryer. Whitefly ...


4

Resurrection Plant,, a small low-maintenance moss, has the odd characteristic that it can stand long periods of adverse conditions (dessication) without weakening. I don't know how available they are in your area, but I see them here and there around here. I know someone who keeps theirs in a box in the attic all year, and takes it out, waters it, and puts ...


4

It does have a noticeable scent, but only if you bruise the leaves, usually. Any allergic response via the air is mostly restricted to when the plant flowers, which is unlikely indoors - it's the pollen that can cause a nasal response in sensitised people. Otherwise, some people may experience contact allergy after brushing against it.


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